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12

In Tanach there are only four: Aviv = first month = Nissan (Ex. 13:4, et al) Ziv = second month = Iyar (I Kings 6:1) Eisanim = seventh month = Tishrei (ibid. 8:2) Bul = eighth month = (Mar)cheshvan (ibid. 6:38) In a letter from the era of the first Beis Hamikdash found in Arad, there is mention (according to some reconstructions) of ירח צח, "the month ...


11

Let's take a step back: the Hebrew calendar uses lunar months of either 29 or 30 days (for 354 days altogether). Now the Bible says that Passover should be in the spring, and if you keep having years of 354 days you'll keep sliding backwards until Passover won't be in the spring anymore, so every so often they'd add a leap month. Sure, other peoples may have ...


10

Rama writes, when discussing how to spell the various Hebrew months in a Get (Shulchan Aruch EH 126:7): אייר, בשני יודי"ן; ואם כתב בחד יו"ד, פסול, אם לא בשעת הדחק. ויש נמנעין ליתן גט באייר, אך במקום הדחק נותנין וכותבין בב' יודי"ן.‏ Iyar is spelled with two Yuds. If one wrote it with one Yud, it is invalid except in pressing circumstances. Some ...


8

This practice is also brought down by Simla Chadasha (11:10); see the מטה אשר there (12) who brings from the פלתי that this practice is from ר' יהודה החסיד and was only a concern then, because in his time there were many who practiced כישוף (magic) on geese, but is now no longer a concern. אין להקפיד ע"ז, כי אז בימי ר"י החסיד היה הזמן גורם, כי רבו אז ...


7

The gemara in Megillah 6b-7a explains why when it investigates the Mishnaic statement that in a leap year, one is required to read the megillah in the second Adar to be yotzei the requirement. (as per dafyomi.co.il) R. Eliezer says, every year we celebrate in the month next to Shevat. R. Shimon says, every year we celebrate in the month adjacent to Nisan. ...


6

Dinonline has an extensive essay on this issue. In short, the Tzitz Eliezer and Yabia Omer allow the writing of the secular date, but mention that the Jewish date is preferred when possible. They do have different ideas on how to write it out (see article for details). The Maharam Schik, on the other hand, was against such a practice (I remember learning ...


6

I've heard that after the sin of the Golden Calf, the Clouds of Glory were taken away. After Yom Kippur, Moshe told the Jews to start donating for the Mishkan. On Sukkos, all the necessary materials were obtained, and the Clouds of Glory returned.


6

Rabbi Shlomo Halevi Alkabetz (author of Lecha Dodi) wrote a commentary of the Megilla called "Manos Halevi". (It is said that he sent the book to his fiance in lieu of "Shalach Manos", since he was poor and could not afford to send her food). He addresses this question, and suggests that perhaps Moshe's death was considered a bad indication for the Jews ...


4

Rambam Le'am (Mosad Harav Kook, 5717) to Hilchos Kidush Hachodesh 8:6 explains that we want to make all required adjustments at the first possible opportunity in the year. We do not want to do anything to affect Tishrei because of all the Yomim Tovim in that month, and so the next possible months which we can change are Cheshvan and Kislev. (See also "Na'veh ...


4

The whole lottery scene is really lifted straight from Midrash. Midrash Esther Rabbasi, to be exact. But the tape adds the whole dialog between Haman and the heavenly voice. In the Midrash, the dialog is between G-d and the angels representing the days of the week and the months of the year. The Midrash says that the reason it didn't land on Tammuz or Av ...


4

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/987524/jewish/Why-Babylonian-Names-for-Jewish-Months.htm So why did we begin to use these names? Why didn't we stick with the Biblical practice of referring to months by their number? Nachmanides suggests that this is consistent with Jeremiah's prophecy: "Therefore, behold days are coming, says G‑d, ...


4

Tammuz originated as a Sumerian shepherd god. In Babylonia, the month Tammuz was established in honor of the eponymous god Tammuz, who originated as a Sumerian shepherd-god, The idolatrous ritual of mourning corresponded with the changing of the seasons. the Babylonians marked the decline in daylight hours and the onset of killing summer heat and ...


3

There’s a Rabbi Frand tape on it. It appears that in the Chasam Sofer’s world, the standard Jewish custom had been to write only the Hebrew date on a tombstone, and then some progressives wanted to include the Gregorian date — he railed against that change. But that was that particular application. Apparently there are documents and letters from the Chasam ...


2

The Babylonian calendar wasn't adopted exactly as it was, but the names of the months were. This was recognized by the Sages in the Gemara, Yerushalmi Rosh Hashana 1:2. Why the Jews adopted these Babylonian names is a good question. In fact, it seems like the Jews did have their own ancient names for the months, such as 'Ziv' and 'Bul', which are ...


2

I see what you wrote in the comment section. Fascinating. I think it possible to trace that legend a bit more. See here. Thus, (also via this, in Geiger, where he draws connections to the Koran): "Thus, when Shamhazai noticed a certain maiden whose name was Istahar, he gazed lustfully upon her and pleaded, "Do my bidding." She replied, "I will not do ...


1

There is a mashal that I am giving from memory. A king was warned that the queen would have a daughter who would die unless the first man that she saw would be at her wedding. He built a castle and the queen gave birth to the daughter there. The castle was staffed only with women and the queen often visited, telling the king how beautiful and accomplished ...


1

To add to what has already been said, I once heard a deeper reason behind the psak of not giving a get in Iyar. One of the themes of Iyar is "Second Chances" - such as - Pesach Sheini second chance for korban Pesach Lag BaOmer second chance for Torah, it was on that day Rabbi Akiva decided after all his talmidim died, to start again with five new students ...


1

Per Breslev.org Sod HaIbbur includes all the secrets of the Torah "סוד העיבור בו כלולים כל סודות התורה". All difficult questions such as Bechira, Why we are the chosen nation, are answered by the Sod HaIbbur - per Rabbi Nosson M'Breslov. The Sod HaIbbur also includes Wisdom and knowledge pertaining to changes and the the future that are pertaining to the ...



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