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The Shulchan Aruch in Yoreh De'ah 249 סימן רמט - כמה חייב ליתן וכיצד יתננה says that the first year one decides to start keeping Ma'aser Kesafim, on separates 1/5 or 1/10 of one's capital. After that, every year one separates 1/5 or 1/10 of the profit on one's income. Since he starts with יִתֵּן עַד חֹמֶשׁ נְכָסָיו it would seem that he considers all one's ...


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It depends on what you mean by "use," because the mode of use (both actual and contractual - see Shach YD 176:1) affects whether the money is considered "loaned" or "rented." In a loan, the money is generally meant to be used financially and may be replaced with equivalent currency. In such a case, the laws prohibiting lending on interest apply. However, if ...


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Rabbi Reisman in Hilchos Ribis deals with this. If you are going to spend the money, then that is defined as a loan and any fee for that 'rental' is 'ribis'. Renting property means that you return the same property that you rented, such as renting a tractor to plow your field. That is why there is a discussion as to borrowing flour to make a cake and when, ...


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This site says Just like there is strong language when it comes to giving loans, Jewish law also uses strong words for those who take loans without the means or the intention to repay them. and quotes Rambam Hilchos Malveh veLoveh 1:3 writes (with my emphasis): Similarly, it is forbidden for a borrower to take a loan and use it when it is ...


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All cryptocurrencies (bitcoin etc.) are not money and never will be. According to Torah Law (Bava Metzia, where it discusses why money cannot be used for a kinyan / acquisition because a person has his attention on the seal on the money-source needed ) and even secular law. Though they might share some characteristics. There is no government issuing it as ...


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Money is not muktzah because it is legal tender - it is muktzah because it has no intrinsic use (See Mishna Berura 310:24). Money fits into the broader category of anything which is not a כלי, a vessel, which is not allowed to be carried on Shabbos (Rema O.C. 308:7). This would seemingly include your coin, which has no intrinsic use. However, even ...


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A) One can only redeem Ma'aser Sheini on coins - that is well codified, starting with the Mishna, all the way through to the Shulchan Aruch. Bank notes are not coins, and do not qualify. To quote the Rambam in הלכות מעשר שני ונטע רבעי פרק ד: ט) אין פודין פירות מעשר אלא בכסף, שנאמר "וצרת הכסף" (דברים יד,כה); וכן אם פדה לעצמו והוסיף חומש, לא יהיה החומש ...


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You can take out the five dollar bill from your bank account. Due to the reserve ratio, every 5 dollars in the bank is 50 dollars the bank may lend out. So by removing 5 dollar, you are affecting inflation by 50 dollars. You can then transfer your maaser sheni to the 5 dollar bill and burn it. Although burning it will reduce the money supply, cause ...


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Basically, ma'aser is given on net income rather than gross income. My Rav has said that the basic concept is that one treats 'income' as the net after expenses. Taxes are considered as expenses in this view. As a result, when calculating ma'aser, taxes withheld are treated as expenses and tax refunds are treated as income. The comment above by @bondonk ...


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In The Laws of Ribbis (chapter 4, section D, paragraph 25, page 88), Rabbi Yisroel Reisman writes: It is important that both the borrower and lender keep accurate records of how much is owed. When records are not kept, there may be uncertainty regarding the balance which is owed. In this case, the borrower may pay the lender an amount of money which is ...



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