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11

It was hidden with the Aron (Ark of the Covenant) and some other things near the end of the first Temple by Yoshiyahu (King Josiah). Source: Talmud, Yoma 52b, תוספות הרא"ש על הגמרא בהוריות (יב.) , הרמב"ם (משנה תורה, הלכות בית הבחירה ד א) ‏ In the second Temple, a Kohen (a Priest-a descendant of Aharon, Moses brother) found a loose stone on the ground in the ...


9

Shach al ha-Torah (to Ex. 16:17) states that the figure of one omer per person was actually averaged out per family. In other words, he says, adults might end up with more than an omer apiece (since one omer wouldn't be enough for them), while the children would get less - but in aggregate, there were as many omerim as members of the family. Ibn Ezra (to ...


7

Pork is not kosher, the taste of pork is not non-kosher. Only the animal itself is. The Midrash Tanchuma speaks of fish called the Shibuta which has the same taste as pork. For each thing that was prohibited, the Lord permitted something else instead. Since He prohibited the flesh of the swine, which is considered so fine, a substitute for it was ...


7

I don't know about Karaites, but see this post at RationalistJudaism that this was the position of Rambam, as well as that of some Yemenite midrashim: http://www.rationalistjudaism.com/2010/06/manna-and-maimonides.html "Rambam seems to have shared the view found in certain Yemenite Midrashic texts (and see too Ibn Ezra to Shemos 16:13), that manna is ...


6

Sforno (to Ex. 16:27) states that the people who attempted to gather man on Shabbos would thereby have performed the forbidden labor of oker (uprooting something from the place where it grows), a subdivision of kotzer (reaping). A marginal note in the Me'oros (Gurary) edition of Berachos (48b) cites this and points out that this implies that it could indeed ...


6

Shut Torah Lishma 63 (h/t Alex for the link) quotes the Rama of Fano as saying that the bracha was HaMotzi Lechem Min HaShamayim. He personally thinks the bracha is HaMamtir Lechem Min HaShamayim following the words of the pasuk that describe the man falling. Note also that the questioner in the responsa quotes "a rabbi" who claimed that no bracha was said ...


5

I heard this from the grandfather of a friend of mine, so I can't really provide a good source, but it's an awesome explanation.The Netziv in Emek Hanetziv on the Sifri Piska 30 Parshas BaHaloscha explains this way as well. The Jews were living in the desert, where they lived a miraculous existence. When they came into Israel, life would revert to a less ...


5

The sefer כמוצא שלל רב has several articles on it. He quotes R' Yehuda Hechosid as specifying "HaMotzi Lechem Min HaShamayim" together with the Rama of Fano. Rav Tzvi Hirsch from Ziditschov quotes the mekubal R' Yisroel Dov that no brocho is to be made as mentioned anonymously in the Shut Torah Lishma 63. Rav Aharon Levi from Reisha supports this view. ...


4

The Talmud (Yoma 75a) quotes two opinions: either the man could taste like everything except 5 flavors but never changed its texture, or the man could change its texture to anything but 5 things but it could still taste like those 5 without changing texture. The 5 things are those mentioned in the pasuk in Bamidbar 11:5: Kishuim Avatichim Chatzir Betzalim ...


3

The discussion as to whether Yeshoshua wrote the last eight lines or Moshe wrote them "bedimah" (either with tears or "confused") applies only to those lines. And Moshe the servant of HaShem died in the land of Moav by the word of HaShem.[Devarim 34:5] On this verse Rashi quotes a famous debate regarding the last eight verses of the Tora; is it possible ...


3

Although Rashi (Chulin 16) cites this verse as support for the view that non-sacrifical meat was prohibited to Jews at that time, that view is not accepted as halacha: in fact we hold that they could and did eat non-sacrifical meat at that time. Thus, I have no reason to think that will change if we ever have manna again.


2

No one today knows where the omer of manna is. It was presumably lost around the time of the Siege of Jerusalem, 597 BCE, although it is possible it could have been lost at other times, such as the descecration by Mannaseh. Its location today is a matter of speculation, similar to the location and fate of the Ark of the Covenant.


2

The actual language there in Yoma 75 is, "The righteous, it fell by the door of their houses." That would be a good sign it was for them. Either way, I don't know if there was a concept of "his" or "someone else's" until one picked it up. It was there for the taking; you'd walk until you found some to gather; you'd gather until your measure was filled. The ...


2

There is a Machlokes whether the Man fell on Yom Tov or not. The Gra in Hilchos Pesach discusses whether there should be 2 or 3 Matzos on the Ka'ara. According to the Rif since you do not need Lechem Mishna on Yom Tov, therefore even after you break the Matza at Yachatz you can still make Hamotzi on the remaining 1 1/2 Matzohs. (Rabbi Moshe Feinstein Zatzal ...


2

You can see my discussion of the basis and meaning of it here: http://parsha.blogspot.com/2007/01/explaining-my-flippancy-yesterday-about.html It is a segulah from R' Mendel Mi-Rimanov, though it is sourced (in different form) as early as Rav Amram Gaon, and even earlier, in the Yerushalmi. But one does not have to leap on to every segulah, as it becomes ...


1

The Mechilta in Parshas Beshalach says that on Shabbos the Maan tasted and looked different than the whole week. (What it means exactly - I do not know - as the Maan tasted based on what you wanted it to taste, so what was different on Shabbos? Also did the Shabbos portion change color on Shabbos or did it look different when you picked it on Friday?) ...



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