Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

The Torah does not command individual violence. Ever. Actually, the penalty for individual violence is rather severe - and even if nobody got killed, they violent person would be required to pay the victim damages, embarrassment, injury, medical expenses and loss of work. Even if the damage was unintentional, the rule is that a person is always responsible ...


0

As DoubleAA pointed out in his comment, your question is very-highly theoretical. The Halacha is (יורה דעה - -סימן שעד): ג: אֵיזֶהוּ מֵת מִצְוָה, שֶׁמְּצָאוֹ בַּדֶּרֶךְ אוֹ בְּעִיר שֶׁל עוֹבְדֵי כּוֹכָבִים, וְאֵין לוֹ קוֹבְרִים, וּמִמָּקוֹם שֶׁמְּצָאוֹ אֵינוֹ יָכוֹל לִקְרוֹת יִשְׂרָאֵל שֶׁיַּעֲנֵהוּ וְיָבֹא לְטַפֵּל בּוֹ וּלְקָבְרוֹ ‏ By ...


5

There is a dispute of the Rishonim as to whether or not daughter in law is a relationship prohibited to Noahides (Ramban vs. Rashba). The Ramban (to Yevamos 98a) holds that Noahides have no prohibition of relationships with relatives who are not blood relatives. He brings a proof to this from the fact that Yehuda absolved Tamar upon discovering her ...


2

Rambam Ch. 9 of Kings & Wars lists all prohibited relatives for Noahides, and "sister-in-law" is not on the list. Therefore, Yibum is not overriding any prohibition for them. Mr. Noahide, you want to marry your brother's ex-wife? That's totally your choice (well, you have to ask her first), whether there were kids or weren't; whether the marriage ended ...


2

Meseches Sofrim 20 seems to imply as much. One may not light an old lamp; one who only has an old lamp may whiten it well in fire, and that is permitted. cf this lecture (around the 22 min mark)



Top 50 recent answers are included