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Mentally ill individuals are known as a shoteh. People who are classified as such are exempt from all mitzvot obligations. (Chagiga 2b) However, determining whether a person is a shoteh must be done on a case-by-case basis. Please see Who is a Shoteh? and the sources below for more information. In particular, As a result of this characterization of ...


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The classic answer to your question is a Rashi in Shemos 12:15 For seven days you shall eat unleavened cakes-: But elsewhere it says: “For six days you shall eat unleavened cakes” (Deut. 16:8). This teaches us regarding the seventh day of Passover, that it is not obligatory to eat matzah, as long as one does not eat chametz. How do we know that ...


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The body of the garment that the tzitzit are attached to is not a davar shebekedusha, but the strings are very much so. In fact, the most mehadrin of strings are spun with tzitzit making in mind. Tying tzitzit is not a bathroom activity. Also, it is probably something that would be easier to do at a desk.


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R' Nissim Gaon on Shabbos 132b says the following: ובזה הפירוש שפירשנו יסיר מלבך ספק גדול שמסתפקין בו בני אדם ושואלין עליו והוא שאומרין מאחר שאנו יודעין שאזהרת לאו קשה מציווי עשה היאך יבא עשה וידחה האזהרה של לאו שהיא חמורה ממנו ומדרך הידוע שהחמור דוחה הקל ולא עוד אלא שפעמים שעולה על דעתן שיש בענין הזה ענין חזרה בדבר הראשון. והתשובה הוא מה שהקדמנו שהאזהרה ...


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The Ramban (Sh'mos 20:8) says that because positive mitzvos stem from loving HASHEM while negative mitzvos stem from fear of HASHEM and love is greater than fear.


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The שלמי חגיגה in 6:(4) (starting on page 30) has 2 long pieces discussing this – and from what I understand, women and Eved Knani are incidentally similar in their obligations. (Not completely incidental, as their dispensations have the same source: both the Eved Knani and the Married Woman have another Boss besides for the Torah. He discusses that too.) ...


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According to HaRav Aviner it falls under "Love your fellow as yourself" Ticket Checker Q: I work as a ticket checker on the bus to insure that all the passengers paid. Is it permissible for me to wake someone up or is it forbidden on account of "Gezel Sheina" – stealing someone's sleep? A: You are obligated to wake him up. "Gezel Sheina" is ...


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Rashi Avodah Zarah 24a writes that depriving someone of sleep is called being metza'er him.


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The Mishneh Halochos has a Teshuva in Shu"t Mishneh Halachot Vol. 12 Sec. 443. He first goes into an explanation from Brachot how its a bad thing to do, then brings a source from Sanhedrin that on the contrary it's possibly a Mitzva to wake someone. In conclusion it applies to someone who is sickly or hasn't slept for three days. Based on this it would be ...


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Short answer: no, it's not a formal prohibition, but it's still wrong to prevent someone from sleeping. From http://www.dinonline.org/2013/11/05/gezel-sheina-stealing-sleep/ The sefer “Ve-Ahavta Le-Re’acha Kamocha” notes that Rav Chaim of Brisk used the expression “gezel sheina,” implying that waking somebody up needlessly is a form of theft. ...



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