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The common expression throughout the Torah and Chazal "ma'ase yadekha" (the work/actions of your hands) is meant to be understood as that which we do and also everything that results from our actions. So yes, being a good role model for others to learn from definitely warrants a reward unto itself. The same is also true in reverse, if due to your wrongful ...


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Neither would be a "bigger mitzvah" as you are calling it. One would be a mitzvah and that would be the rich man who gives $1000 and the poor man who gives away such a llarge amount of money would be taking away needed money from his family. There is a limit on how much of one's earnings one is permitted to give away especially if doing so will end up having ...


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On the contrary, the penultimate Mishnah in Chapter 5 of Pirqe'i Avot states (my translation): בן הא הא אומר, לפום צערא אגרא Ben He He says, 'According to the pain is the reward' Since each marginal dollar from the poor man is a higher percentage of his income, he receives greater reward for nevertheless choosing to give to others beyond the ...


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On the contrary, intentions are what matter. A poor person doing everything he can is treated just the same by God as a rich person doing everything he can. We can learn this from the classic statement אחד המרבה ואחד הממעית - ובלבד שיכוון ליבו לשמים (Whether one gives a lot or a little, the important thing is his intent). The source is about size of the ...


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The question is highly perceptive. As this reference shows the matter is a source of discussion which Maimonides explains. The 613th mitzvah of the Torah is the obligation for every Jew to write a Torah scroll. In the words of the verse: "And now, write for yourselves this song, and teach it to the Children of Israel. Place it into their mouths, in ...


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Yes this is how the Rambam, Maimonides, codifies it (and he is one of the greatest codifiers of Jewish law). It is the last of the 613 mitzvot (commandments). As R Jack Abramowitz describes it The last of the 613 mitzvos is the obligation for every man to write a sefer Torah. Recognizing that not every individual possesses the requisite skill to do ...


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According to some, you have to wear a Kippah outside in Public, but according to others less strict you only wear a kippah during prayers. The reason why we wear a kippah is because it reminds us of the Shechina and its bacially showing respect to HaShem. Also it shows that (when out in public) you are Jewish. I am just like you buddy, I wear kippah most of ...


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Tsitsit is a Mitsva written in the Torah for men wearing some clothes fulfilling conditions of form and composition. Kippa is a custom linked to good character and humility. Both are excellent. As you can place Tefilin without Tsitsit and Brit milah without Tefilin, the lack of Kippa does not prevent the Mitsvat Tsitsit. It is obvious. Maybe I will add later ...


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R Norman Lamm (in a 1965 typeset dvar Torah !, see also here) mentions the source as being the Vilna Gaon (p. 7). He applies it (pp. 8ff) to tsedaka and gives examples such as lending money with no interest, not feeling bad about giving money, mishloach manot (well, that changed!) then shatnez, shaving, rising in front of the elder, minha in a mynian, ...


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See Yebamot 63b, see Mishna Ketubot 7, 6 תכא is table, it is a modest (tsniut) figurative image related to conjugal life. See Nedarim 20b for the use of the word "table" (A woman once came before Rabbi and said, 'Rabbi! I set a table before my husband,) See Rabi Yehuda Bar Natan ‎ מקשטא ליה פומא‏ ‎=‏ wait until a meal to offend ‎ מהדרא ...


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See Ramban on this verse: כי לא יחדל אביון מקרב הארץ. מפרשים [1]‏ אמרו שלא יחדל האביון מקרב הארץ באחד מכל הזמנים כי לעולם יהיה אביון בארץ שגלוי היה לפניו שלא יעשו מה שאמר להם כי לא יהיה בך אביון אם שמוע תשמע בקול ה' אלהיך לשמור לעשות את כל המצוה ‏[2]‏ ואינו נכון לדעתי כי התורה תרמוז במה שעתיד להיות אבל לא יתנבא עליהם בפירוש שלא יקיימו התורה ...


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'For the poor shall not cease out of the midst of the land'-- Undoubtedly, (and sabbahillel correctly noted), this means 'forever'. 'Shall not cease' is the literal translation; however tendentious it may seem, this is what G-d said. As for predestination, Judaism's view of prophecy is described in Yirmiyahu (Jeremiah) 18:5-10: וַיְהִ֥י דְבַר־יְהוָ֖ה ...


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I do not understand what you are saying synagogues and congratulations But for part 2 you are probably referring to the saying of our sages Avoda Zara 3a The nations will then plead. 'Offer us the Torah anew and we shall obey it.' But the Holy One, blessed be He, will say to them, 'You foolish ones among peoples, he who took trouble [to prepare] on the ...


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The "work" forbidden on Shabbat does not mean hard, physical work or employment. It is "melacha" = creative work. There are 39 main categories of melacha http://halachipedia.com/index.php?title=Index_of_Laws_of_Shabbat_by_the_39_Melachot So, even if Shabbat would be a "reward" for working the other 6 days (and there is no mention of this - every Jew is ...


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Without commenting on the specific situation, shabbat's rest is an absolute obligation which doesn't depend on what one does during the week. Whether one worked or rested during the work, one needs to abstain from creative work (melacha) on shabbat. Shabbat is not observed because it is a reward but because God commanded so, as a memory for the creation of ...



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