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16

There is a little known Chassidic text published in 1834 entitled Pri Yitzchak that details all 613 Mitzvot and the corresponding limbs for positive mitzvot and 365 Gidim for negative commandments. It has not been translated from the Hebrew. It is a very sophisticated work. He uses the list of halachic limbs listed in the Mishna, and uses the Rambam's list ...


15

In the Moreh Nevuchim, Rambam explains how God's attributes should be understood without compromising God's unchangingness. He compares God's mood to a fire. If you put ice in a fire, it melts, then evaporates. If you put clay in a fire, it hardens. If you put wood in a fire it burns... The fire causes many different and contrasting effects without changing ...


15

Although I think he is a Da'at Yachid, the Semag, in his list of the 613 Commandments, counts male masturbation as a Biblical prohibition in Negative Command #126.


13

The Talmud (Baba Metzia 59B) says, in the name of R' Elazar HaGadol, that 36 times in Torah we are warned against the wronging of a convert (46 if you count the times it says "because you were strangers in egypt" and the like - Tosafot). The reason given is because a convert has a strong inclination for evil, and you do not want to drive him back to his old ...


13

There is no lav in the Torah against eating outside the Sukkah, so it would just be a bitul aseh. It says "Basukkos teshvu", but does not say anythink like "lo tochal chutz me'suka".


12

I don't have an explicit answer, but since women are not obligated to sit in the sukkah, and we know that women are obligated to fulfill negative commandments, it would stand to reason that eating out of the Sukkah would be a Bittul Asseh.


12

The Chinuch, in his introductory letter, breaks it down like this (apparently differently than the Chofetz Chaim): There are 613 Mizvot, 248 Positive and 365 Negative. (The Chinuch bases his sefer on the Rambam's enumeration of the Mitzvot.) The Total amount of Mitzvot that a person can do these days is 369, however 99 of them (78 Positive and 21 ...


12

The Wikipedia passage you quoted is accurate but could do with some elaboration. Their use of the word "virtue" may have misled you because other religions see sex more negatively. While not encouraging promiscuity, Judaism also doesn't call for asceticism. Procreation is an outcome of sex but not the only motivation. Within marriage, a certain level of ...


12

The Talmud (Sanhedrin 22b) points out that a woman tends to be more emotionally involved with the man with whom she first had relations. (I think that there are modern studies that say much the same thing.) Furthermore, to a certain degree - this part is true of men as well - a person tends to at least subconsciously compare their current partner with ...


12

A non-Jew certainly may wear tefillin (in other words, there is no law against them doing so), but they will not be fulfilling a mitzvah. From that perspective, they might be viewed in the same way that one views a Jewish woman who lays tefillin: the Shulchan Arukh (Orach Chaim 38:3) exempts her but allows her to wear them if she wishes. Note, however, that ...


11

This question was discussed by the Meforshim (traditional commentators), who use Genesis 26:5 as a springboard for this discussion. The verse states: עֵקֶב אֲשֶׁר-שָׁמַע אַבְרָהָם בְּקֹלִי וַיִּשְׁמֹר מִשְׁמַרְתִּי מִצְו‍ֹתַי חֻקּוֹתַי וְתוֹרֹתָי. Rashi holds that the Avot kept the entire corpus of Halacha - all of Torah sheBa'al Peh — including Rabbinic ...


11

Very conveniently, the answer lies plainly in one verse. VaYikra (Leviticus) 19:17 states, "Do not hate your brother in your heart; you surely must rebuke your neighbor, but you must not bear sin because of him." (My own translation) Rashi there states: "but You shall not bear a sin on his account: I.e., [in the course of your rebuking your fellow,] do not ...


10

The Sefer Hachinuch lists the prohibition of women lying with animals (#211) separately from the general prohibition of men lying with animals (#210). that a Chalalah may not eat הקדש -- holy food (#304) the prohibition of a woman wearing men's clothing (#564) separately from the prohibition of a man wearing women's clothing (#565)


10

The criterion for a Sanhedrin to have the powers that you enumerated (and a lot of others too) is that its members have semichah (ordination) that goes back, in succession, to Moshe Rabbeinu. Such semichah also has to be given specifically in the Land of Israel, so it died out when the Jewish communities there dwindled (depending whom you ask, anywhere from ...


10

Maybe that's just it. With exile having been our dominant mode of existence for most of our history, there is a real danger that we'll come to see that as the norm. By having - and learning about - so many mitzvos, with the details richly given, that we can't perform in galus, then that drives home the point that things are not how they should be, which in ...


10

The Lubavitcher Rebbe says (in a long speech about "Family Planning") that One of the strongest objections is fear of financial inability to support children. Naturally, parents want the best for their children, and fear of being unable to provide adequately is a powerful deterrent to having them. This is a genuine concern -- but based on an assumption ...


9

The Aruch Hashulchan in Orach Chaim 671:2 notes this difficulty and explains that for mitzvos involving publicizing of a miracle (פרסומי ניסא), including Chanukah candles and the four cups of wine on Pesach (Orach Chaim 472:13), one must spend all of his money. Of course this just brings up another question: why should פרסומי ניסא cases be so strict?


9

The classic Sefer Chareidim by R' Elazar Azikri (d.1600) catalogs all the mitzvos according to body parts. (R' Elazar Azikri was also the author of the poem, Yedid Nefesh.) An abbreviated version, Kitzur Sefer Chareidim, was written by R' Avraham Danzig, author of the Chayei Adam. The sefer does not attempt to establish a precise one-for-one match for each ...


9

The technical reason is a Gemara in Kiddushin that says that since women are not obligated in Tfilin (which is mentioned in a verse near the verse that speaks about Torah learning, where it says (Vshinantem levanecha, you shall teach your son(and not your daughter))), which they are free from because , they are not obligated in any commandment similar to ...


9

One reason taught to me is that there is still work to be done in the Diaspora. You must take into account the contribution you can make and are making to the Jews in your country of origin, and what effect its loss might have on them. I remember my Rosh Yeshivah pointing out to us that Yeshivah bochurim are special and valuable members of the community. ...


9

Person. You don't need to have tzitzit on a tallit that you keep in a drawer. Source: Talmud Menachot 41. See also Rambam Hil. Tzitzit 3:10-11, Shulchan Aruch OC 19:1


9

To start with, there is the commandment in the Torah (Deut. 6:5): ואהבת את ה' אלקיך... ובכל נפשך ובכל מאדך ("You shall love Hashem your G-d... with all of your soul and with all of your might"), which the Mishnah (Berachos 54a) explains to mean, "even if He is taking your soul away," and "with all of your money." In a halachic context this is cited in ...


9

The list of differences can be found in an appendix to the Minchas Chinuch. Ramban includes all of these positive mitzvos, which the Rambam doesn't Mitzvah 1: Positive mitzvah of eating maaser sheni. Mitzvah 2: Positive mitzvah of not eating impure trumah Mitzvah 3: Positive mitzvah of not selling shvi'is fruits Mitzvah 4: Positive mitzvah of settling ...


9

Basically, we don't have the power to declare someone categorically exempt. Abudraham suggested one explanation, but our system of laws categorically says "all men are obligated", "all women are not." If a person is truly in a situation beyond their control, halacha recognize that. If it's five minutes before sunset and a single dad who hasn't yet prayed ...


9

I think that the question presupposes that the coming of Moshiach is a reward for our work during the era of exile, and in that case that's a fair point, since we're supposed to do mitzvos "not in order to receive reward" (Avos 1:3). However, the Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l cites in this connection a statement by R. Schneur Zalman of Liadi (Tanya, ch. 37) that ...


9

It is a prohibition not to stand by as another Jew is in any kind of danger, be it physical or financial. ALL of the Monei Hamitzvos include it. See Behag 93, Saadia Gaon 61, Rambam 297, Semag 165, Ramban 293, Chinuch 237, Semak 79, etc.


8

Matanos laevyonim, mishloach manos, and s'udas purim. Source: Magen Avraham 692:1, cited l'maase in Aruch Hashulchan :2 and Mishna B'rura :1. (More precisely, that's a source for saying shehecheyanu on these mitzvos, not for not making another b'racha on them.)


8

Let's start with the fact that the usual description is that a child below this age doesn't have daas. What is daas? R' Shalom Dovber Schneersohn zt"l, the fifth Lubavitcher Rebbe, defines it (in Kuntres Hatefillah ch. 5) as the ability to empathize. A young boy or girl may be smart enough to understand something intellectually (such as that being poor is ...


8

I think that we do necessarily have to suppose that they kept some mitzvos only in the non-literal sense. For example, there are the mitzvos concerning a "depraved city" (ir hanidachas), a "rebellious son" (ben sorer umoreh), and a house with tzaraas, all of which are pretty rare (and indeed according to some opinions in Sanhedrin 71a, never actually ...


8

Biblical mitzvos are in bold. Items that are minhagim or otherwise are not mitzvos are listed for completeness but are not bold. -- Each is followed by the corresponding (set of) body part(s) 30 days of blowing shofar (in Elul) -- 30 in the feet 10 offerings brought on Rosh Hashana -- 10 in the ankles 2 approaches to the aron(?) -- 2 in the shins 5 people ...



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