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1

My answer is reaction to both the previous answer as well as accounting for @DoubleAA's comment. I've had this situation a few times in my shul while I was reading the parsha. Our shul rarely has kids attending. (Sad, somewhat...) When I fiind a questionable mistake, I call the rav. He makes the final decision. Sometimes he can tell, it's definitely no good ...


1

If there is a doubt whether or not a letter is properly formed, a child, who can recognize letters but does not yet know how to read, is brought, and checks the letter. If he identifies it properly, the torah is considered kosher, and the reading continues; if not, the torah is pasul and must be fixed. Source: Shulchan Aruch OC 32:16 The Mechaber paskens ...


0

No, you don't. Shulchan Aruch OC 108:10. If you say it in the first but not the second, that's optimal. If you say it in either both or neither, you're yotzei. If you say it in the second but not the first, the first didn't count, and it seems you'd have to daven a real tashlumin (the "second" counts for maariv).


7

In the first case you have (where it's an appropriate b'racha) the רמ״א (in 209:1) is quite clear that you're okay: וכל שכן אם היה בידו יין וסבור שהוא מים ופתח אדעתא לומר שהכל ונזכר ובירך בורא פרי הגפן שיוצא שהרי אף אם סיים שהכל יצא (טור): Surely if he had wine in his had, and thought it was water, and started with the intention to say Shehakol, but ...


0

I asked my rav (who is from Ner Yisrael in Baltimore) and he said that that the bracha on a item is conected to the food that is eaten only. The bracha acharonah is not (in that sense) connected to the bracha rishona. Thus if one makes the wrong bracha rishona, one should still make the correct bracha acharona. He said that since the bracha rishona and the ...



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