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22

The Mishna Brura OC 549 sk 3 says to continue fasting if you accidentally ate. In OC 568 sk 3 he says you can still say Aneinu at Mincha if it is a public fast day (as opposed to a personal one). In OC 568 sk 8 he says that you do not need to fast again on a different day for accidental eating on the public fasts as well as any personal fast that has a ...


12

(Source: this article on Torah.org) If the one who made the mistake is a Jew: Absolutely yes, you must return it. If the one who made the mistake is a non-Jew: there's lots of discussion, and it appears it's not so clear. But remember: doing so anyways will create a Kiddush Hashem (and is probably the right thing to do). To quote a relevant story retold ...


11

I think it depends on the child and is entirely up to the parents' judgement, consistent with their general policies on Internet access and on Halacha learning (1). Hopefully, all parents these days are teaching their kids not to believe everything they read on the Internet (or in real life for that matter) and skills for gauging the credibility of ...


11

This idea, that it's based on a mistaken expansion of 'בשב (meaning 'בשמואל ב) to mean בשבת, comes from R. Baruch Epstein's Mekor Baruch. However, it is demonstrably untrue. The custom of alternating between מגדיל on weekdays and מגדיל on Shabbos is mentioned by Avudraham, who lived in the 14th century. (He doesn't mention the custom of doing so on Yom Tov ...


10

I don't have sources, but logically: On a purely halachic level, the prohibition is "eating" and your eating is done. It is a m'uvas lo yuchal liskon (Kohelet 1:15). One can argue that as long as the treif is in the system, there remains a kabbalistic issue of timtum halev, that the treif spiritually affects the body. However, this is not clear since the ...


10

R' Joseph B. Soloveitchik's understanding of Ne'ila, which I saw in the Machzor Mesoras Harav, is that it's a uniquely dependent prayer whose purpose is to ask God to accept all the other prayers we've engaged in over Yom Kippur. He was confident enough in this understanding that he proposed a practical Halachic outcome: If someone happened to miss all four ...


9

When you finish with meat, look at your watch and say, "Okay, no dairy until 4PM. 4PM. 4PM" (Or whatever time.) Especially helpful on short shabbos afternoons; as soon as you're done eating meat, check the clock, add the appropriate number of hours, and think about what that time will feel like. Of course, waiting the appropriate amount of time is the ...


9

Klilos Chasanim - page 79 in the name of Mesechtas Kallah Rabsi 1:1, Shaalos U'Teshuvos Peer Hador 9, Igros HaRam 23, Tanya Rabsai 91, Beer Haitaiv 62:3, Knesses Hagedola 9:3, Sidur Bais Oved says that if one skipped a Bracha of the Sheva Brachos you just say the skipped Bracha at that point as the order is not Meakaiv.


8

Source: The Weekly Halacha Discussion Per Igros Moshe Orach Chaim 2:68, and Shmiras Shabbos K'Hilchoso 31:1 a non Jew may open the fridge for you due to Psik Reishei. Closing the fridge will cause the light to go off and is therefore prohibited. In a case where that it is a "Hefsed Meruba" large loss if the fridge remains open you are allowed to get a non ...


8

I'll have to look for sources, but let's consider: the naming is done as part of a Mi Shebeirach that mentions "the new mother ---, and her daughter who was born at an auspicious time, and her name is ---." So if it turns out that the baby was a boy after all, then presumably the whole thing would be a patent falsehood and therefore of no halachic ...


8

The printed version of Tur (end of Orach Chaim 688) says that in that case the parshiyos would not have to be read again, and Beis Yosef there agrees. However, Darchei Moshe and Bach there argue that this version is incorrect, and that indeed they would have to be reread in (or, for Shekalim, before) Adar Sheni.


8

Indeed, the Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l (sicha of Shabbos Parshas Ki Tisa 5741 secs. 55-57) called for them to always be depicted as square, in keeping with the Gemara you mentioned. (And Chabad publications long before that, as far back as 1942 at least, followed the same convention.) He states that shape with rounded tops was popularized by non-Jewish ...


7

I once sat next to somebody on a flight to Israel (where our normal sense of time is probably even more distorted), and as soon as we were done the fleishig meal, he set the timer on his watch to make sure to wait the alloted time. I don't know if he always did this, or just on a flight, but it seemed like a great idea. Practically speaking, though, I don't ...


7

I think that for me personally, as a religious Jew, I am always conscious of what I am putting into my mouth. I need to think about kashrus, shiurim, bracha rishona, bracha achrona, etc. Basar v'chalav is one part of my thinking before I eat something and I think this is something that can be learned through routine.


7

"Your intention is to take out food, not turn on the light." Unfortunately good intention only gets you so far. The Gemara says all agree you can't say "oh I just wanted to cut off the chicken's head because my kids like playing with chicken heads; my intention wasn't that the chicken should die!" (This argument is known as psik raisha, or "severed head"). ...


7

Something that might bear on this is in Proverbs (26:4-5): "Do not answer a fool according to his folly, lest even you become like him. Answer a fool according to his folly, lest he be wise in his sight." Noting the obvious contradiction, the Talmud (Shabbos 30b) points out that the first statement is referring to "worldly matters," the second to Torah ...


7

The luchot are a 1 amah cube of sapphire (6x6x6 tefachim) (Baba Basra 14a) 3x6x6 tefachim individually (Baba Basra 14a) The writing filled each side ("tradition". I think I saw this in a Gemara too) There are more words in the first 5 commandments, so the letters were a smaller size to fit.(Mabit) The letters were carved straight through the luchot. (Shmot ...


7

Rabbi Yair Hoffman has an analysis in the 5 Towns Jewish Times here (hat-tip to VIN for pointing me to it): The article views the question primarily around the issue of Onaah which it defines as 16.7% above or below market value (and possibly just a pricing mistake regardless). If that issue applied, then the sale would be invalid. The conclusion of the ...


6

There's a similar case discussed if you forget e.g. yaleh v'yavo by mincha and only remember after nightfall. You repeat shemoneh esrei even though you don't say over yaleh v'yavo. It seems like it doesn't accomplish anything, but at least that shemoneh esrei was done correctly. So perhaps here too, the eating would be correct even though not leaning. Though ...


6

The Chinuch (Mitzvah 380) says that celebrating Pesach is so important because it showed the whole world that G-d is in control and powerful, and has the power to renew/create the world ex nihilo. G-d gave us Pesach to celebrate this. Since this lesson is so important, if one missed the opportunity G-d gave him another opportunity to celebrate this.


6

The Shulchan Aruch writes (OC 215:2) that one should not respond amen to a bracha recited by an adult Jew if שינה ממטבע הברכות he changed the way the bracha was coined. The Mishna Berura there notes that this is due to the fact that if he changed it too much that he would not fulfill his obligation, it is then a bracha levatala to which one is forbidden to ...


6

Yes, the brachas don't always go hand-in-hand. For instance, let's assume (but check with your rabbi) that one piece of pizza is a "snack", and two makes a meal. Kitzur Shulchan Aruch rules (about pseudo-bread items, let's assume pizza is such an item) that if you decide you only want one piece of pizza, you make a mezonot then eat it. If you then change ...


5

You can't consider it a tefillas nedavah (voluntary prayer), because you started it under the impression that it was required. So you simply break off wherever you are holding. (Shmuel in Berachos 21a; Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 107:1)


5

Actually, it isn't the only one. The korbanot brought on each festival also come with make-up days (7 or 8 days after the onset of the obligation). Missed tefillah, which were modeled on korbanot, can be made-up for one period after the cessation of the previous period. For example, if one missed Ma'ariv, it can be made up the following morning up until ...


5

If you last ate meat at 1PM, and you normally wait 6 hours, then you can eat dairy at 7PM. It makes no difference what you've done in between. If you ate something you shouldn't have earlier, we don't penalize, but neither do we say you can eat whatever you want. Rinsing your mouth would probably be advisable, but not required -- nothing about "prohibited ...


5

To add a source to Shalom's answer: In The Kosher Kitchen, the author writes that it is a common misconception, but eating dairy after meat does not "break" the required waiting time (of whatever that person holds - e.g. 6 hours). The full amount of time must still elapse before eating more dairy.


5

In terms of moving the object, you should be fine as it is 'kilachar yad' (moving in a abnormal way). In terms of the drawer, if the muktza thing was the only or most important thing in the drawer it becomes a basis for the muktza item and is muktza as well. If there were other things in the drawer of higher importance than the muktza does not dominate and ...


5

Per Rabbi Eli Monsour based on Rabbi Ovadya Yosef in Halichos Olam 4:137 One may not ask a gentile to turn on one's oven or stove to heat food on Shabbat, even if he will otherwise have no hot food for his Shabbat meal. If a non-Jew does turn on the appliance to heat the food, one may not partake of the food until after it once again cools, and ...


5

In terms of deriving benefit from the actions done by a Jew on Shabbat the Shulchan Aruch (OC 318:1 and Mishna Berurah and Biur Halacha there) distinguish between a number of cases: If a biblical prohibition was violated purposefully (deoraita bemeizid) then no one can derive benefit from it for the rest of shabbat, and the violator himself cannot derive ...


5

Based on a statement from Pesachim 105a, if Kiddush was not said on Friday night either by accident or on purpose it can be said the entire next day (Rambam Shabbat 29:4, Shulchan Aruch OC 271:8), with the exception of the introductory paragraph of Vaychulu which is only said at night as that is when the creative work was originally finished (Rama, ad loc). ...



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