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13

The Commentary on the Mishnah came first. In his colophon at the end of it, Rambam writes that he began writing the commentary at age 23, and finished it at age 30, in the year 1479 of the "Era of Documents" (4928 since Creation, 1168 CE). The Mishneh Torah, on the other hand, was written in the 4930s. In the introduction he says that the current year is ...


12

With regard to Sh'kalim, I believe the answer does indeed rely on publication practices. The practice of printing (and therefore studying) Sh'kalim with the rest of Talmud Bavli Seder Moed can be traced as far back as the times of the Geonim. [The idea is that Sh'kalim is short and therefore relatively inexpensive to print with the rest of Seder Moed to ...


10

The Rav (ad loc.) explains that these are opposites: One who borrows without repaying doesn't foresee that, therefore, people will refuse to lend to him in the future. R' Shim'on b. N'san'el didn't want to say "one who doesn't see what's coming", explains the Rav, because others who don't see what's coming aren't so bad, as they may be able to get around ...


10

An Google spreadsheet with all that information (and more!) is available here. A screenshot of the more relevant part is clipped below:


10

From Soncino's intro to Seder Moed: "It might be observed that the designation 'Mo'ed' is in the singular, as distinct from the plural forms used to designate the other Orders, e.g., Nashim, Nezikin, etc. It has been suggested that the singular is here specially used to avoid the confusion that might arise through the employment of the plural Seder Mo'adim ...


10

if she confesses she won't be put to death by Beis Din since you need 2 witnesses for that. and if there are 2 witnesses then she won't be tested by the sota water, hence there are not 2 witnesses. therefore, she would be saving her life from the water by confessing and would not be executed by beis din.


10

Rabbi Gamliel was not the best rabbi of all time. I do not know of any Rabbi who has ever been given that title, except from sub sects of Judaism who might venerate one Rabbi over another. Many Rabbis are given pinnacle accolades, declaring that without them the nation would be lost, or after them there was a great reduction of some kind. However, being ...


9

Shulchan Aruch covers the order of the day, from when you wake up until when you go to sleep. Therefore it starts with the morning, when you wake up. (no source, just my own thought)


8

HaMaor Volume 46 Number 3 Page 26 says that since all the Yomim Tovim are going to be nullified besides Purim when Moshiach comes therefore it is called Moed in singular form as the only Mesechta remaining will be Megila. Otzar Kol Minhagei Yishurin Siman 7 * note says that since the names of the Shisha Sidrei Mishna are based on the Pasuk והיה אמונת עתיך ...


7

I vaguely recall seeing some discussion about the whole "heat adding" thing years ago (maybe an old AOJS article?), but unfortunately don't have the details. Honestly, I'm still not certain how to understand the mishna. But off the top of my head ... Leo Levi's The Science in Torah suggests that something like manure worked by fermenting, and fermentation ...


7

We say every morning "Neshalma parim sefatenu". Since we cannot offer Korbanot , we got the Tfila instead. So the Tfila follows the order of the Korbanot. For the Korbanot the day starts after sunrise.


7

There are 4192 Mishnayos. Source: The back of the משניות set that's called משנה סדורה. See this online downloadable version.


6

The Shulchan Aruch records this Halacha unopposed in OC 110:8. The Mishna Berura there notes that the Ari would say this prayer every morning. He also notes the Rambam's opinion (commentary to Mishna Brachot 4:2) that these prayers are obligatory and says the the Elya Rabba and others all seem to rule like the Rambam. The Aruch HaShulchan (OC 110:16) notes ...


6

First of all, as @msh210 noted, R' Shimon ben Nesanel cannot have said "someone who does not see the consequences of an action", because that is simply the absence of a good trait, but not necessarily a bad one. It would have been equivalent to if R' Eliezer had said "one who does not have a good eye." That said, the simplest way to understand R' Shimon's ...


5

Tamid is, except for the very end, a story of how things used to be in the bes hamikdash. You can practically just read through it without commentary (though having a floor plan of the second bes hamikdash — usually published as an appendix to nearby maseches Midos — handy will help a good deal).


5

Choosing a quick and easy mesechta of mishnayos is a highly subjective activity. The first consideration, obviously, is length. However, there are plenty of relatively short mesechtos, so this is not a major problem. The biggest issue, especially for someone with a limited background, is to avoid having too many new concepts at once, especially big ...


5

Rashi's shittah is to explicate the gemara - not to provide a stand-alone peirush on the Mishna. As such, you will find that his interpretation of any given mishna will vary depending on the context in which the gemara is quoting it. To give you an example, consider Shevi'it 4:10. There, the mishna asks and answers a question as follows: מאימתי אין ...


5

I would offer three answers, which I believe may be true simultaneously. 1 While scribes were extremely careful for pesukim in Tanach, so as not to invalidate the kosher status of the sefer, they were not so careful when quoting pesukim when they occurred within the Gemara. Add to that that sometimes earlier manuscripts will shorten words or phrases with ...


5

The answer to your first question about the meaning of the expression "sowing" can be found in Rashi in the gemara Bechoros 22a (fruits of my learning in this program!): One puts the vessel containing the impure water in the mikveh until the water of the mikveh passes over the mouth of the vessel and makes contact with the water that is in the vessel. ...


4

While your summary might work for the general behavior of bringing sacrifices of birds in ideal situation, your summary does not cover, or give reference to the border cases, and what exactly is to be done with various birds or situations that can not be offered. Also, at the point in time in which the mishna was written, these cases were not done in ...


4

The book Kol Yehudah explains that the Gra held that "chasurei machsara" means that the gemara is saying that it initially appears that the mishnah is missing something, but at a closer look it really is not missing at all. The Pe'as HaShulchan explains that the Gra held that it means that the gemara was really actually changing the intent of the mishnah, ...


4

The first actual description of it is given by the Ohr Zarua (Kilayim 1:288): A sort of animal (named yedua, used to do yidoni) attached to the ground, that can destroy anything that approaches it; but if someone somehow manages to disconnect it from the ground, it dies immediately. In the introduction to Tanchuma, it relates a story that someone invited a ...


4

The tenth (final) chapter of Pesachim deals with Seder practices such as the Mishnaic version of Mah Nishtana.


4

I don't know about Nida and Shabbat, but as far as mesechet Taanit I heard a really interesting explanation. I'm clearly not doing the explanation justice here, but in the Talmud Yerushalmi, Mesecht Taanit, is called mesechet Taniot. Because outside of Israel, you can not declare new fasts, and many of the fasts that were declared were optional based on ...


4

You must mean a non-Jewish (actually, quasi-Jewish) slave, a "shifcha." (I.e. she was born non-Jewish, then underwent a part-conversion when she became a slave.) A born-Jewish, "ama ivriyah" goes free automatically upon reaching puberty, so that case is moot. I don't know whether the partial conversion given to a shifcha already wipes out all existing ...


4

The word would appear to be a semi-colloquial pluralization of the word טהרה, appearing in the Torah as a nominal infinitive. Exclusively in the singular, its nikud is טָהֳרָה. (By "semi-colloquial" I mean that a word like that is already somewhat abstract and shouldn't need to be pluralized to refer to the class of activities that pertains to purity and ...


4

According to the Kahati comment on that Mishnah, it should be read A ger brings but does not read ... If [he is not a ger but only] his mother is Jewish he brings and says ... Kahati explains that this is put in because we might think that a person whose father is not a Jew but whose mother is a Jew would not be able to say the pasuk because the term ...


4

I was always taught that the Mishna is the most authoritative because it was redacted while the braisos were deliberately left out of that text, and this becomes apparent when learning gemara because amoraim following braisos are challenged by quoting mishnayos but rarely the other way around. However the only print source I can think of off hand is The ...


4

The first פני יהושע in Keitzad Mevarchim discusses this question. His suggestion is that the Mishna is only listing berachos that include a lot of different species, to contrast with R' Yehuda who is brought at the end of the Mishna and says each species needs its own specific blessing. According to Tosefos in the discussion of kimcha d'chiti on berachos ...


4

The Tosfos Yom Tov (in both places) notes this apparent contradiction in the Mishnayos. His answer is that the improvement made by olrah wood is different because then the benefit came from something prohibited, as opposed to by Maaser Sheni where the wood was something permitted. I think that this answers your question, because the issue with orlah is not ...



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