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10

The Bavli, M'gila 10, clarifies that once the temple in Jerusalem was built there is no longer anywhere else we can offer sacrificial offerings. Its holiness is forever and precludes other sites. Rambam (Bes Hab'chira 1:3) rules accordingly.


9

“Mikdash” is a more generic term for a “holy place” or (following Rav S. R. Hirsch) a “sorce of holiness”. The Mishkan was the specific Mikdash built in the desert. (Note the same root SH-K-N in mishkan and v’shakhanti.) For your second question, God is not promising merely to dwell in the tent built for Him but to be an active Presence within the nation: ...


9

Even if the threads are fairly fine (and we don't know if they were), two colors plied together still looks like two colors, not the combined color. Thread is not like paint. Now even if at the usual viewing distance most people would see it as the combined color, it would not look that way close up, like to the kohein wearing the garment or tending to the ...


8

R' Hirsch (e.g. in the long comment at the end of Ex. 25:1-8) takes the four types of thread used in Mishkan construction to represent four basic aspects of life that we humans need to strive to perfect within ourselves and unify in the service of God: Linen, from the flax plant = Vegetative - consumption and reproduction Wool died red with worm blood = ...


8

I'm still hoping someone has a sourced answer, but I came up with a possible answer last night - reverse order. I was learning Shabbos 104a, where the Gemara gives a really nice explaination of the meaning behind the order/shape of the letters in the alef-bet, and how it reflects the actions and reward of a Tzadik. Since the luchot could be read from both ...


8

Rashi says it was the outer, Copper Mizbeach that was covered. This makes sense to me, since it was supposed to be a sign to Bnei Yisroel, and only the Kohanim really see the Gold Mizbeach. However, this certainly raises the question 'how is coating the Copper Mizbeach with more copper is a sign?' It seems like this was a permanent covering, but I can't ...


8

The Mishna (Zevachim 3:1) states: כל הפסולין ששחטו שחיטתן כשרה שהשחיטה כשרה בזרים בנשים ובעבדים ובטמאים אפילו בקדשי קדשים Anyone who is invalid for Temple service who slaughtered [a sacrifice], the slaughter is valid, for slaughtering [sacrifices] is valid even for non-priests, women, slaves and even impure people, even for the holiest of sacrifices. ...


8

The Talmud (M'nachos 96a) explains that David and his coterie were in mortal danger of starving at the time, which legally supersedes the prohibition against them eating showbread. Another approach, mentioned by the Radak (ad loc.), is that the loaves were loaves from a korban todah (thanksgiving offering) that a non-priest could consume while in a state ...


7

The Gemara (Eruvin 2A-3B) actually uses this verse to prove that a Mikdash is sometimes called a Mishkan. (Actually, that Gemara actually says that "Mikdash" and "Mishkan" are interchangeable terms). The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains that according to Rashi (the simple explanation of the text), one cannot say that "Veshanchanti Besocham" is a result of ...


7

From Rashi to Shabat 73:1 on the Mishna: ".. and writes one letter in one (plank) and another one in the adjacent". From here we learn that there was only 1 letter in each one. But the letters were written in pairs (one for each plank) that's the reason why the melacha speaks of 2 letters. א-א, ב-ב, ג-ג... Although I didn't find a source for it but the ...


7

The Ha'amek Davar offers two explanations: His first answer is that a there was a constant miracle that the bread always stayed fresh for the week between its baking and its consumption. Similarly, the original bread miraculously stayed fresh for many months. His preferred answer is that the original bread was made by Betzalel just to demonstrate what it ...


7

How about Yoav (Melachim I, 2:29)? He goes into "Ohel Hashem" (literally translated as Tabernacle in some places), and holds onto the "horns of the altar". Yoav was not a cohen (relative of King David), and if I'm not mistaken, neither is the guy who is sent in after him (Binayahu Ben Yehoyada). Also, in similar vein you've got Adoniah (Melachim I 1:50), ...


5

I enjoy my copy of Carta’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. It does a great job of helping the reader picture the architecture of the Mishkan and Beit Hamikdash and the service in them. I frequently refer to it for illustration when discussing these topics. I also have enjoyed the novels I've read from the "Naftali in the Mikdash" ...


5

The book of Exodus ends with "as God's presence was with them, for all their travels." The Ramban explains that they didn't achieve full redemption from Egypt until that point. Now they had a post-Egyptian purpose and identity.


5

The Netziv in his introduction to Sh'mos says that the ultimate purpose is NOT the redemption from Egypt, but the building of the mishkan and subsequent dwelling of the Shekhina. Remember, the exodus itself happens relatively soon in the sefer, while matan torah and the mishkan take up a much larger portion.


5

With thanks to Danny Schoemann who pointed me at a reference to what I’d remembered without a source. Here is how the Torah describes the tabernacle altar (Shemot 27:8): נְבוּב לֻחֹת תַּעֲשֶׂה אֹתוֹ; כַּאֲשֶׁר הֶרְאָה אֹתְךָ בָּהָר, כֵּן יַעֲשׂוּ׃ Hollow with planks shalt thou make it; as it hath been shown thee in the mount, so shall they make it. ...


4

A couple of possibilities: Betzalel may have put them in temporarily (to make sure they fit), and Moshe was the first one to put them in permanently (after which it was prohibited to remove them again, as stated in Ex. 25:15. Daas Zekeinim on that verse in fact explicitly states that this prohibition took effect once Moshe put them in). Or, וישם in 40:20 ...


4

I think I understand your question to be leaning more towards philosophy, however the question works in a broader sense as well, so I'll answer the basic question as worded in the heading, "Why are Melochos based on the construction of the Mishkan?" The simplest answer to this question is that the Mishkan needed to be constructed almost entirely from ...


4

The Mishnayot in the last chapter of Zevachim outline the journey of the Tabernacle. When the Jews arrived in Israel: The Tabernacle was in Gilgal for the 14 years of capturing and dividing the land. It then moved to Shiloh for 369 years. When Shiloh was destroyed (I Samuel 4), the Tabernacle was moved to Nov until it too was destroyed (I Samuel 22:19) ...


4

Ralbag at the end of Sefer Shemos gives several thoughts as to why the Torah repeats the details of the vessels in the account of the mishkan's construction. The possibilities he considers are: People at that time told stories like this in a repetitive fashion, and the Torah is merely immitating the expository style of the time. There are plenty of ...


4

Dafdigest for Eruvin 105. I have extracted parts of the article which speaks about workers working in the Temple on the plating which was fastened on the walls of the Kodesh Kodoshim. The inside walls of this special chamber were plated with gold panels, which were attached to the walls by artisans and workmen (see Mishnah Middos, 4:1,5). If we do ...


4

Ⅱ Chronicles 35:11 describes non-priest levites' slaughtering[1] and skinning sacrificial animals. [1] according to the commentary of M'tzudas David inter alia


3

If I understand correctly, you are referring to the brichim, the horizontal poles that were slipped through rings on the boards -- and through holes within the boards -- to hold them in place. The math is straightforward: There were 20 boards of 1.5 amos on the north and south, thus requiring the poles to span 30 amos (the top and bottom poles were 2 x 15 ...


3

R. Shalom Dovber Schneersohn (the fifth Lubavitcher Rebbe), in one of his discourses (Sukkos 5674, part of the series known as Beshaah Shehikdimu 5672, which he began delivering on Shavuos 100 years ago) gives an explanation that may bear on this. He points out (in sec. 205) that there are two letters of the alef-beis that are completely sealed closed: ...


3

God's overarching command to build the Mishkan is Shemot 25:8: וְעָשׂוּ לִי מִקְדָּשׁ וְשָׁכַנְתִּי בְּתוֹכָם And they shall make Me a sanctuary and I will dwell in their midst. R' Samson Raphael Hirsch, in his commentary1 on this verse, explains that its two clauses present two intertwined purposes for this construct, each alluded two by one of ...


3

The strings where mixed not just to get the desired color. Each detail in mishkan has its deep meaning about how G-d rules our world and so on. It's like asking: "Why we take 3 hadasim on Sukkos, one is already green enough?".


3

One thing that has struck me — but that, in my limited experience and AFAIR, I haven't seen anyone mention — is that the m'nora of the mishkan was, according to a midrash (cited by Rashi to 25:31), created miraculously automatically when unshaped gold was thrown into fire and that Aharon, according to the Mizrachi (quoted in Sifse Chachamim to 32:24), lied ...


3

Sifse Chachaim 22 (tav) to 31:6 indicates that B'tzal'el was in charge, Aholiav helped him with his tasks, and the two of them delegated other responsibilities to the others. In other words, the two of them were in charge; this, I assume, is why they were mentioned by name.


3

Rav Hirsch writes on that verse (Exodus 25:8 -- page 538 in the Shemos volume of this set), that the message of the Tabernacle is based on that verse: "ועשו לי מקדש ושכנתי בתוכם" -- "make for me a Mikdash, and I will dwell [שכן] in your midst." He writes that our mission ("ועשו לי מקדש," to build the Mikdash) results in ושכנתי בתוכם (the manifestation of the ...



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