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9

“Mikdash” is a more generic term for a “holy place” or (following Rav S. R. Hirsch) a “sorce of holiness”. The Mishkan was the specific Mikdash built in the desert. (Note the same root SH-K-N in mishkan and v’shakhanti.) For your second question, God is not promising merely to dwell in the tent built for Him but to be an active Presence within the nation: ...


8

Even if the threads are fairly fine (and we don't know if they were), two colors plied together still looks like two colors, not the combined color. Thread is not like paint. Now even if at the usual viewing distance most people would see it as the combined color, it would not look that way close up, like to the kohein wearing the garment or tending to the ...


8

R' Hirsch (e.g. in the long comment at the end of Ex. 25:1-8) takes the four types of thread used in Mishkan construction to represent four basic aspects of life that we humans need to strive to perfect within ourselves and unify in the service of God: Linen, from the flax plant = Vegetative - consumption and reproduction Wool died red with worm blood = ...


8

Rashi says it was the outer, Copper Mizbeach that was covered. This makes sense to me, since it was supposed to be a sign to Bnei Yisroel, and only the Kohanim really see the Gold Mizbeach. However, this certainly raises the question 'how is coating the Copper Mizbeach with more copper is a sign?' It seems like this was a permanent covering, but I can't ...


7

The Mishna (Zevachim 3:1) states: כל הפסולין ששחטו שחיטתן כשרה שהשחיטה כשרה בזרים בנשים ובעבדים ובטמאים אפילו בקדשי קדשים Anyone who is invalid for Temple service who slaughtered [a sacrifice], the slaughter is valid, for slaughtering [sacrifices] is valid even for non-priests, women, slaves and even impure people, even for the holiest of sacrifices. ...


7

The Gemara (Eruvin 2A-3B) actually uses this verse to prove that a Mikdash is sometimes called a Mishkan. (Actually, that Gemara actually says that "Mikdash" and "Mishkan" are interchangeable terms). The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains that according to Rashi (the simple explanation of the text), one cannot say that "Veshanchanti Besocham" is a result of ...


7

I'm still hoping someone has a sourced answer, but I came up with a possible answer last night - reverse order. I was learning Shabbos 104a, where the Gemara gives a really nice explaination of the meaning behind the order/shape of the letters in the alef-bet, and how it reflects the actions and reward of a Tzadik. Since the luchot could be read from both ...


7

From Rashi to Shabat 73:1 on the Mishna: ".. and writes one letter in one (plank) and another one in the adjacent". From here we learn that there was only 1 letter in each one. But the letters were written in pairs (one for each plank) that's the reason why the melacha speaks of 2 letters. א-א, ב-ב, ג-ג... Although I didn't find a source for it but the ...


5

I enjoy my copy of Carta’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. It does a great job of helping the reader picture the architecture of the Mishkan and Beit Hamikdash and the service in them. I frequently refer to it for illustration when discussing these topics. I also have enjoyed the novels I've read from the "Naftali in the Mikdash" ...


5

The book of Exodus ends with "as God's presence was with them, for all their travels." The Ramban explains that they didn't achieve full redemption from Egypt until that point. Now they had a post-Egyptian purpose and identity.


5

The Netziv in his introduction to Sh'mos says that the ultimate purpose is NOT the redemption from Egypt, but the building of the mishkan and subsequent dwelling of the Shekhina. Remember, the exodus itself happens relatively soon in the sefer, while matan torah and the mishkan take up a much larger portion.


4

A couple of possibilities: Betzalel may have put them in temporarily (to make sure they fit), and Moshe was the first one to put them in permanently (after which it was prohibited to remove them again, as stated in Ex. 25:15. Daas Zekeinim on that verse in fact explicitly states that this prohibition took effect once Moshe put them in). Or, וישם in 40:20 ...


4

I think I understand your question to be leaning more towards philosophy, however the question works in a broader sense as well, so I'll answer the basic question as worded in the heading, "Why are Melochos based on the construction of the Mishkan?" The simplest answer to this question is that the Mishkan needed to be constructed almost entirely from ...


4

The Mishnayot in the last chapter of Zevachim outline the journey of the Tabernacle. When the Jews arrived in Israel: The Tabernacle was in Gilgal for the 14 years of capturing and dividing the land. It then moved to Shiloh for 369 years. When Shiloh was destroyed (I Samuel 4), the Tabernacle was moved to Nov until it too was destroyed (I Samuel 22:19) ...


4

The continuation of the Ramban is needed to understand his explanation. He is saying that since once the Mishkan is completed the Glory of Hashem will dwell there, there will be in the Mishkan a preponderance of the Attribute of Strict Justice (this is what is meant by the Glory of Hashem according the Ramban), but the burning of the incense will quell the ...


4

Ralbag at the end of Sefer Shemos gives several thoughts as to why the Torah repeats the details of the vessels in the account of the mishkan's construction. The possibilities he considers are: People at that time told stories like this in a repetitive fashion, and the Torah is merely immitating the expository style of the time. There are plenty of ...


3

R. Shalom Dovber Schneersohn (the fifth Lubavitcher Rebbe), in one of his discourses (Sukkos 5674, part of the series known as Beshaah Shehikdimu 5672, which he began delivering on Shavuos 100 years ago) gives an explanation that may bear on this. He points out (in sec. 205) that there are two letters of the alef-beis that are completely sealed closed: ...


3

The strings where mixed not just to get the desired color. Each detail in mishkan has its deep meaning about how G-d rules our world and so on. It's like asking: "Why we take 3 hadasim on Sukkos, one is already green enough?".


3

One thing that has struck me — but that, in my limited experience and AFAIR, I haven't seen anyone mention — is that the m'nora of the mishkan was, according to a midrash (cited by Rashi to 25:31), created miraculously automatically when unshaped gold was thrown into fire and that Aharon, according to the Mizrachi (quoted in Sifse Chachamim to 32:24), lied ...


3

Sifse Chachaim 22 (tav) to 31:6 indicates that B'tzal'el was in charge, Aholiav helped him with his tasks, and the two of them delegated other responsibilities to the others. In other words, the two of them were in charge; this, I assume, is why they were mentioned by name.


2

אא:אא, אב:אב, אג:אג, אד:אד – את:את This is why the halacha for writing requires 2 letters.


2

K'li Yakar to 35:22 notes that the men, who had sinned by donating their jewelry toward the egel's construction, needed the penance of donating such items toward the mishkan's, but the women, who hadn't done so, didn't need it; nonetheless, the women donated their jewelry toward the mishkan, which the Torah mentions there in their honor.


2

moshiach.com has an interactive tour of the Beis Hamikdash.


2

See translation Verse 4: Greenish-blue [wool], dark red [wool], crimson [wool], fine linen, and goats [hair].


2

Oops, I missed that Alex added this answer above, but I'll keep it here for the comments. The Meshech Chochma answers that Betzalel placed the staves in the rings on the side of the Aron. This was its mobile positioning. When Moshe set the Aron in place, he set the rings and the staves within on the top edges of the aron's walls. This was its resting ...


2

See this article, which brings 3 opinions about the timeline (Ramban, Rashi, and Zohar). The article (based on a Sicha from the Lubavitcher Rebbe) explains that the three opinions are discussing whether the commandment to make a dwelling place for G-d apply only to a Tzaddik, also a Baal Teshuva, or even a Rasha. The Rebbe then says that "These and these ...


2

God's overarching command to build the Mishkan is Shemot 25:8: וְעָשׂוּ לִי מִקְדָּשׁ וְשָׁכַנְתִּי בְּתוֹכָם And they shall make Me a sanctuary and I will dwell in their midst. R' Samson Raphael Hirsch, in his commentary1 on this verse, explains that its two clauses present two intertwined purposes for this construct, each alluded two by one of ...


2

I would like to build off of SethJ's answer. The idea is not that the milachas are based on the construction of the Mishkan. Rather, the construction of the mishkan is how we know what the milachas are. What is forbidden on Shabbat is constructive labor (independent of anything having to do with the Mishkan). Now, to answer your question about the golden ...


2

In Maayanah Shel Torah, a teaching is brought in the name of R"I MiKuzmir, who I'm pretty sure is R' Yechezkel Taub of Kuzmir, the founder of the Modzitz Dynasty. Here's a rough translation: We know the the Holy Temples were destroyed because of Baseless Hatred. When Yosef and Binyamin met, and felt that their separation until now had been caused by of ...


2

Maimonides (Hil' Klei Mikdash, Ch.9:8-13), describes there being two rings on the Shoham settings, onto which the ends of the cable would be fastened. Kesef Mishnah describes the details in law 11 of Maimonides as being 'explained in the verses'. I do not understand where he finds evidence for the upper rings of the shoulder straps. (Credit sam for source!) ...



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