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9

First of all, the whole point of the 'river turning to blood' was that it was supposed to be a miracle, an event showing that superiority of a force over the natural world (i.e. science). So, if anything, your example proves that the Jews DO believe in modern science, as they believe that there's no natural way to turn water into blood without divine ...


7

Technically, "modern science" incorporates quantum mechanics, which includes the ideas of particles "blipping" in and out of existence, as well as that of all that science predicts are probabilities not definitive absolutes. So modern science doesn't really contradict the miraculous (which are essentially then statistical anomalies). Furthermore, at a ...


5

The Talmud is replete with miracles. The first 5 pages of the 5th chapter of Tractate Bava Basra (beginning here and ending here) are almost entirely dedicated to miraculous stories that happened to Rabba Bar Bar Channa. Many of the miracles of the Talmud are subject to discussion if they are meant to be taken literally. However, some are generally ...


5

It was made out of Sapphire and had the words דצ"ך עד"ש באח"ב , (an acronym of the Ten Plagues) inscribed on it. See Pirkei Avos chapter 5:6 with its commentaries.There are also midrashim on this topic. From Pirkei D'Reb Eliezer 40 ר' לוי אומ' אותו המטה שנברא בין השמשות נמסר לאדם הראשון מגן עדן ואדם מסרו לחנוך וחנוך מסרו לנח ונח לשם ושם מסרו לאברהם ...


5

There is a tradition that these three people had asked Ezekiel whether they would be saved, and he responded in the negative. The story is referred to in Zohar Toldos 142a but discussed at length in Midrash Rabba Shir Hashirim (sometimes called Midrash Chazis) 7:13. There, a long discussion is recorded between these three would-be martyrs and the prophet ...


4

From the plain reading of the text (Daniel 3:17-18), we see that they were unsure whether Hashem would save them. In particular, they say (3:18) והן לא (and if [Hashem does] not [save us]). In Shir HaShirim Rabbah (on 7:8, על דעת ר׳ שמעון), we see a midrash that relates how Chananiah, Mishael, and Azariah went to Ezekiel to ask whether Hashem would be ...


3

It seems that the Mishna (the source of what you are quoting) differentiates between an open miracle and a natural miracle. Once one has started measuring one's granary - then if it increases it's an open miracle. Open miracles are too obvious and rarely happen. Before one has started measuring, then an increase is impossible to prove. The Mishna suggests ...


3

Romamos Kel - Alshich on Sefer Tehilim says that the noise of the Barad were noises from the Olam Ruchni, out of this world. Thus the lack of lightning was not an additional miracle as the thunder was not regular thunder.


2

There seems to be differences of opinion whether the "sounds" refers to thunder, and whether there was lightening as well. See the Pirush H'kesav V'hakabala on Exodus 9:23 in which he cited some commentaries who are of the opinion that the "sounds" refer to thunder, and the fire refers to lightening. He however, is of the opinion that it does not refer to ...


1

@magicker72 and @Matt found the medrash that identifies Ezekiel as the prophet that they asked. Since they answered the question, I am just going to expand on why it appears to be a "nevuah that was not carried out". Note that he did not prophesy that they would not be saved but Ezekiel tells them that Hashem is not with them (לא מתקיים עליכם). However, ...


1

The Ramchal in Da'as Tevunos explains that Hashem's hidden-ness is the only vehicle for fulfilling the purpose of the world. He writes that the purpose of the world is to reveal Hashem's singularity and unity, and he writes that this attribute can only be attributed through the negation of the apparition of its opposite. There is required to be a world in ...


1

Rabbi Yerachmiel Zeltzer compiled (and commented upon) some 100 answers is his נר למאה sometime in the 60's. It has recently been republished and is available online here. More recently, another volume, ימי שמונה has been published that contains 500 (!) answers and is available online here. Both volumes are still in print and are available for purchase from ...


1

Rambam (Hilchot Megillah u'Chanukah, ch 3) states that we celebrate the military victory and the re-institution of Jewish sovereignty in Israel. We celebrate for 8 days because the oil burned that long.



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