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15

It's something like that, based on my observations of my local Reform and Conservative communities. What I notice in particular with the Conservative daily minyan is that there are some regulars, some people who just come to say kaddish, and some people who initially came to say kaddish (for a month or for a year; I don't mean one day) and then stuck around. ...


7

I wholly agree with Monica's excellent answer, but I would like to point out another phenomenon. Many non-Orthodox Jews go through a portion of their adult lives without giving much thought to religious practice. A traumatic event like the death of a parent can cause them to re-evaluate their lives. They may see the end of the long chain of familial ...


6

The Mishna in Megillah (23b) says they need a Minyan, and the Gemara there clarifies that the groom himself can count as one of the 10. The Gemara (Kallah Rabbati 1:3, Ketubbot 7a) derives this requirement from Boaz (Ruth 4:2). Although a Minyan is require to recite the full Sheva Berachot, the Shulchan Arukh (EH 62:4) rules that a Minyan is not required to ...


4

According to chabad.org the answer is yes because all seven of the brachos (from the wedding) are said - hence the name. Here is the relevant paragraph. Note that if there are other sheva brachot being arranged for this couple, someone who has not been at any of the other meals must be present. A minyan (quorum of ten adult Jewish men) must be present in ...


3

What Monica said in her answer is completely true. I would like to suggest another possible reason for this phenomenon. The reason is practicality. Orthodox Jews tend to live in clusters. Due to the diversity of "streams" of Orthodox Judaism (each one wanting to have their own shtieble), there are often clusters of many Orthodox synagogues within a small ...



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