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You must daven the tachnun according to the nusach you normally daven. The kitzur shulchan oruch says that one cannot chop and change nuschaos as they are all weighted and each word is counted. If you would like to add vidui before tachnun then that's okay, but you should try not say sephardic tachnun when davening in ashkenaz l'moshol. Rav Moshe Feinstein ...


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Yes. Source: People do. See this article, where it talks about how Sigd has become an Israeli holiday (on the calendar since 2008), celebrated by both Ethiopians and non-Ethiopians. However, if you look at the article above, you can see them prostrating, which is a problem according to mainstream Judaism. If joining, you might want to skip that part.


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You asked: Is this a Jewish minhag? If so, what is the source for it? Yes. it is mentioned in the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 199:10 - סימן קצט - דין הקבורה ובית הקברות "The custom - when leaving a cemetery - is to pluck some grass and throw it behind one's back, and say זָכוּר כִּי עָפָר אֲנָחְנוּ - remember that we are dust." You asked: What does it mean? ...


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On chabad.org it says the following: On the way out of the cemetery, it is customary to pull out some grass, throw it back over the shoulder, and recite the passage below. This symbolizes the Resurrection of the Dead in the era of Moshiach, when the body will awaken and return from the dust of the earth, as it is written, "And may they blossom ...


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It appears that the wedding ring worn on the right hand is originally a European custom. The custom at the chupah is to put the ring of the kallah's right pointing finger not the "ring finger". The "ring finger" on the right and left hand is a custom picked up from the nonJewish inhabitants of a local area. How the Ring Is Given Despite the fact that ...


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See this article which related this question to the Atzeres Hatefila event. (I'm unfamiliar with what this event is or when it occurred. I just noticed the article as it relates to answering your question.) Excerpt: Prior to the event, the question was raised whether the bracha can be recited if unable to ascertain whether there truly are 600,000 in ...


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The Halacha is that you are not allowed to count people. But you could count noses, or shirts, or left shoes, or ... (source: Magen Avraham O.C. 156 - 4th wide line of right column here).


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שרשי מנהג אשכנז by R' Rav Binyomin Shlomo Hamburger (4 vols) is a popular set on the 'Yekkishe' Minhag. While it is out of print, some stores still sell it, and a new edition is being prepared. Find out more and see sample pages at their website.


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It means curled/twisted up and stuck behind your ears. I have geknipte peyos.


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I don't know why, but R' Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (עלהו לא יבול p96) maintains that the Israeli custom is not to say this prayer at all. Nonetheless, one who has had a bad dream and wishes to say the תפילה, can do so during שים שלום. Source: שיח תפילה


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It would seem that a woman does not need to follow her husband's minhagim for things that are considered ladies' mitzvos. Thus R' Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe EH 2:12) writes that it is up to a woman if she wants to wear a sheital (wig), and she doesn't need to follow her husband if he feels it's not good enough as this is one of her mitzvos. Rabbi Doniel ...


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I heard from Rabbi Yisrael Reisman (Brooklyn, New York) that, although one may not be exposed in general, he may in a bathhouse, and our bathrooms with showers or bathtubs count, so one can undress in a bathroom that has a shower or bathtub. My memory may misserve me, of course, and you should consult your rabbi for a practical ruling in any event.


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As a J.SE user with a rep of over 70k, I can hereby say that I find the minhag annoying on occasion. Rav Yaakov Emden went further than "I find it annoying." He bitterly complained about it, noting that because people can't eat rice and corn, instead they'll have to eat more matza, and it's likely that the demand for high volumes of cheap matza will cause ...


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The Baal Shem Tov wrote that while a Tzaddik should say "I'd love to eat pig, but what can I do if Hashem prohibited it to me", a Baal Teshuva has to be disgusted by it. That's why we say "sins become like merits", that he has no more desires for that sin. I guess the same would apply to "the sin of eating kitniyos"


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It's more than just learning. It's also a connection to the Rebbe. http://www.chabad.org/therebbe/livingtorah/player_cdo/aid/1878852/jewish/The-Basics.htm This perhaps can answer both your questions.


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It would seem that all Chabad learning cycles are limited to 1 year or less (save for one exception). Keeping to a yearly cycle would seem logical as most of Judaism revolved around the a yearly cycle. Chumash - follows the parsha of the week and completes in 1 year Tehilim - Finished monthly Tanya - Was divided by the Rebbe Rayatz to be learned on a ...


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Warning: This answer contains original research and anecdotal evidence. I got curious about this because of how hard it is to open gassot and the risk of damaging the battim or parshiyos when you do. Gassot are currently the standard and some sofrim even refuse to sell dakkot, but the transition seems to have happened relatively quickly. A little over ten ...


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Rav Moshe in Igros Moshe YD 2:138 writes that it is better to avoid writing bais hey and one should use beis samach dalet instead. Rav Betzalel Stern in Batzel Hachahma 4:105 writes that one does not have to worry that a paper with bais hey will get thrown out and one can use it. He brings that the Sfas Emes and Chiddushe Harim used it on their ...


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There is a discussion amongst the ראשונים whether "והתקינו שיהא שואל שלום חבירו בשם" (Berachos 54a) is a היתר (allowance) or a חיוב (obligation). Rav Soloveitchik discusses this in הררי קדם (collected by Rav Michel Zalman Shurkin from students' notes on the Rav's lectures), part two, number 124 (page 262). Because of the possibility that this was a היתר, ...


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I'm not sure why this question wasn't answered earlier, but here goes. The order of the two brachot (wine and day) on Friday night is an area of dispute between Beit Hillel and Beit Shammai in Mishnah Brachot, chapter 8. Hillel says to do the wine first, Shammai says to do the day first. In the Gemarah (Brachot, 51b) the rabbis explain that Hillel's logic ...


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There is no Neturei Karta dress code: Each member dresses according to his custom or preference. That being said, many are very religious and seek a old fashioned outwards appearance. Therefore, many will e.g. opt for a flat shtreimel without "crown". Your pictures: The graybearded man is a Hirsch1. He is anti-chassidic litvish, and wears the traditional ...


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From Wikipedia: Symbolism According to Rabbi Aaron Wertheim, Rabbi Pinchas of Koretz (1726–1791) stated, "The acronym for Shabbos is: Shtreimel Bimkom Tefillin -- the shtreimel takes the place of tefillin."[4] Since wearing special clothing on Shabbat is a form of sanctification, among the Hasidim of Galicia and Hungary, the shtreimel is associated ...


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As DanF cited, there appears to be a Hassidic custom about "no bonds are as strong as this one." I don't know the source on that, but here's a theory. There's a slightly more prevalent custom for the chasan to remove any jewelry he's wearing before going under the chupa. This could easily be explained by the nuts-and-bolts halacha that the kiddushin would ...


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According to this shuir(starting at 16:30) from Rav Shachter, quoting Rav Soleveitchik, this is not a minhag based on anything (minhag shtus).


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According to this article: Before the chuppah all the knots on the groom's garments are untied. This symbolizes that at the moment of marriage all other bonds are eliminated, except this intimate one made between the bride and groom. Apparently, this may be a Hassidic custom? I haven't seen any weddings where I have seen this done. Then, again, I ...


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Your question spans two areas: What is the consideration of the bracha of matzah during the non-Pesach time of the year? Can I change my minhag just because I want to (from my inference of your question)? To answer the 1st question, you may want to read this Chaf-K article that discuses how and if matzah and matzah crackers fall into the category of pat ...


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There is a famous story in which R' Chaim Volozhener had his collector purchase a new, more high-class carriage for his collection rounds, in order to increase the image of the Yeshiva and encourage higher donations. A certain donor said he could not donate. When R' Chaim heard of it, he went to the man's home and asked him why he didn't donate. The man ...



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