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Rav Moshe Feinstein (Igrot Moshe YD 4:61:4) ruled they should not split up because of BeRov Am, and all the more so in a case where the extra group would not be in a Shul or even a room without a Torah scroll. Rav Chaim Kanievsky (Gam Ani Odekha (Shonim) 3:34) says it is better in your situation not to split up into multiple Minyanim. Rav Yehuda Herzl ...


1

I spoke to a number of people regarding the different placements of Anim Zemiros. The reasoning I was told had to do with people not being there on time if done early on in Davening thus missing out on it, to not opening the Aron Kodesh special for it therefore saying it when the Aron Kodesh is opened for the reading of the Torah, to not saying it after ...


2

Nitei Gavriel - Aveilus 2 67:3 says that after searching in all the Sefarim of many different Kehilos, Chevra Kadishas, and Aveilus, he could not find a source for an unveiling. He mentions on the bottom that the Steipler was once discussing this with his son Reb Chaim Kanievsky, and he said that it is most likely not of Jewish origin.


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my inkling is to say you should not stop wearing it based on the idea of maalin bakodesh v'ein yaridin (one goes up in holiness but no down) The idea being that once you accept upon yourself wearing a tallis you wouldn't stop. Not the same but related is a divorced man or a widow would not stop wearing his tallis.


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From http://www.torah.org/learning/hamaayan/5769/yisro.html# (hattip: @Salmononius2): Thursday night of the week of Parashat Yitro: It was the custom among the Jews of Tunis to hold a "Seudat / Feast of Yitro" on this night. Some say that the feast commemorates the feast that Yitro made in this week's parashah (18:12). Others say it celebrates the ...


5

Journal of Halacha & Contemporary Society, No. XXI - Spring 91 - Pesach 5751 has an article by Rabbi Michael Broyde - Adjunct Assistant Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School, and Rabbi Howard Jachter - Associate Rabbi of Congregation Beth Judah in Brooklyn which gives Rabbi Auerbach's opinion in his own words. The article concludes that current ...


2

I think you are asking about three separate issues Until what age can one see one's daughter nude? Can one pray in front of naked child? Can one pray near a toilet/potty? You are welcome to edit your question if somehow you wanted to ask for different things. Briefly, 1. Until what age can one see one's daughter nude? I don't believe there is an issue ...


2

My Rosh Yeshiva, Rabbi Leib Tropper, instructed his talmidim to make a shin shape of the middle three fingers, but did not explain it. Later, a very learned chassidic/yerushalmi friend of mine told me that this, together with a folded up pinky and a 90-degree-bent thumb makes דשי, i.e. שדי, and I have seen many chassidim do so.


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In order to possibly find a specific answer to your question, it requires understanding what the source for the different behavior is between Askenazic and Sephardic minhag. And excellent and brief discussion of this is provided by Rabbi David Sperling on Yeshiva.org. Question: Why do Sephardi Jews sit when reciting the bracha for tefillin? ...


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In the Paradesi Synagogue in Kochi, India, everyone is required to remove their shoes upon entering. Source: My wife and her family's personal experiences and Wikipedia.


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I have seen many who do this in practice, and I'm almost sure that it's always to mark the name of שד-י. The only source I could find however is here, where the rabbi who is answering the question says that Rabbi Ovadia Yosef mentions this in his book Maor Yisrael. In my opinion this is much more of a minhag that is passed by people seeing other people and ...


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Many Karaite communities pray barefoot in deference to Exodus 3:5. It was the standard practice of Rabbinic Synagogues of the Middle east to take off their shoes. But as the modern European culture became the norm in the Middle East, people started wearing nice leather shoes and keeping them on. This same development occurred with prostration. Originally ...


1

Well there's this Rabbi Adir HaKohen who brings a small siman (from Rosh HaShanah daf 14b) for why the focus is the evening. In addition, here's a collection of halachos for Tu BiShvat, where the rabbi brings one source for day (Even Yisrael) and two for night (Yafe LaLev and Moed Lekol Chai). Do not know these sources well enough, sorry :)


3

Unfortunately I do not have the time to check each source specifically, but here are a few pointers: Rabbi Shalom Jerby from Nofit in Israel says that Sephardic communities in many places stand, including Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, and more. Rabbi Ovadia Yosef says that even though lechatchila one should stand, there's a sod to sitting, and he brings a few ...


1

Quotes from two of Rabbi Leib Tropper's Shoel Umaishiv emails: Dec 24, '15: Rav Moshe [Feinstein], zt'l took the position that the choson only earns the status of 'Choson' after the chupah.‎ Therefore if after the Choson's Tish people would daven mincha he would also say ‎'Tachnun'. He would not stand up for the Choson or the Kalah as they walk ...


1

For what it's worth, I once asked my rabbi whether I should wear tefillin on Chol HaMoed. His opinion was that those who do not don tefillin on Chol HaMoed are doing the wrong thing, though they should be put on without a berakha. He mentioned that if I would be davening in a place where nobody puts on tefillin (like most minyanim in Israel, as many of the ...


2

According to this (It's a Google book, on p. 154 - in case link has a problem,) the first use of the Torah pointer in Europe was in Northern Italy dating back to the 15th century.


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The earliest reference to its use is in connection with the schools of Bethar before the destruction of that place in the war of Bar Kokba (132-135). http://jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/15047-yad


3

The Jewish Press of the week of January 9, 2016, brings a small piece by Rabbi Soleveitchik saying the tzibbur stands when the chassan and kallah walk down the aisle to honor the parents that are bringing their children to do the mitzvah of kiddushin. I think he also mentions the mishnah in bikkurim as a source to why we stand to honor the parents in this ...


2

When Pesach started, it cut short sh'loshim (the "thirty days" you speak of).



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