Tag Info

New answers tagged

-2

Mitzvah and halacha are two very different things... halacha is the law, and mitzvah is the commandment to perform. Halacha gives us the direction in how to perform that mitzvah. So when you ask, "is it a mitzvah?", and then say "is it halacha?", that's pretty confusing. For that reason I'm ignoring the word mitzvah and focusing on halacha, since that's ...


2

if by "Inyan of Upsherin" you mean hair cut then see @Danny Schoemann's answer but if by "Inyan of Upsherin" you mean the Inyan of chinuch form this answer the first haircut is about teaching the child about the Mitzvah of Pe'ot, since we cut the hair and leave the Pe'ot. Why do most people do it at 3, because age 3 is associated with starting to ...


3

An classic source for the Upsherin is the שערי תשובה in שו"ע או"ח סי' תקלא סק"ז He says: המנהג בארץ ישראל לעשות שמחה בתגלחת הראשונה של קטן, שמחנכין אותו במצוה להיות לו פאות הראש.‏ ‏ "The custom in the land of Israel is to make a joyous occasion out of the child's first haircut, when one inaugurates him into the concept of [not destroying] his ...


0

I was taught (Conservative) that the Torah has several of the attributes of a person, and is only one step below God in authority. I tend to provide the same respect to the Torah as I would a flag officer.


3

I do not know about Teaneck, but the following is a list of shuls that I know about that say ma'arovith in the New York area. All these minyonim say the Ashkenaz (German) version printed in the Rödelheim machzor. Ma'arovith is recited on all yomim tovim with the exception of Rosh haShonoh and Yom Kippur. According to the Frankfurt, A.M. custom they are ...


3

While many shuls don't make Kiddush on Sukkoth, Many others do. According to the Mishanah Berurah only the 1st 2 nights of Pesach are exempt. (See ArtScroll Machzor.) In some places the chazzan or Shamash makes Kiddush in the shul's Sukkah if there is one.


0

Traditional object not a ritual, and it should go from right to left like any other hebrew.


2

Yes, except for the 1st two nights of Pesach when there is an obligation for people to make Seder and drink 4 cups of wine. Kiddush, then, is the 1st cup. Source: Halachipedia. There is a debate if, nowadays, we should be saying Kiddush in shul, altogether. In the days of the gemara, the Rabbis instituted saying Kiddish in shul for the travelers who ...


2

R' Shlomo Zalman Aurbach, in Maadanei Aretz ch. 18, writes that Halacha trumps Dina D'Malchusa Dina. For example, if A took B to secular court and won, B would have to pay A as a result of Dina D'Malchusa Dina (even though A was not allowed to take B to court to start), but B could then sue A in Beis Din for his unjustified losses in secular court, because ...


5

I'd say, "mess away!" While relatively recent Hassidic sources have ascribed all sorts of significance to the dreidel, if I'm not mistaken the earliest sources simply discuss the practice of gambling on Chanukah. (Chavos Yair, if I'm not mistaken.) Dreidel seems to simply be a form of gambling that rabbis originally tolerated at best, that at some point ...


0

Maybe it's because of this idea, seen on torah.org: According to the "Kol Bo," "some have a tradition to draw water [from a well] Motzei Shabbos, because Miriam's Well supplies all the wells each Motzei Shabbos, and one who does so and drinks will be cured of illness" (Orach Chaim, 299:10) See also the last paragraph of bais yosef 299.


1

As wine used to be much stronger than today, drinking wine undiluted was considered bad manners. Oppositely, whereas at the time, wine could be very diluted and still be considered wine, we fear that dilution will remove its status as wine. Therefore, we add a few drops to not drink it undiluted, but also not risk losing its status.


4

Probably to ensure it's not Pagum. I.e.: If somebody already drank from that wine, it cannot be used for Kiddush or Havdala unless wine or water is added to it, as Paskened in Shulchan Aruch. סימן קפב - דין כוס ברכת המזון, ושלא יהא פגום ו: יְכוֹלִין לְתַקֵּן כּוֹס פָּגוּם עַל יְדֵי שֶׁיּוֹסִיפוּ מְעַט יַיִן, וַאֲפִלּוּ עַל יְדֵי שֶׁיּוֹסִיפוּ ...


1

There is a difference between respect and worship. Respect means that you are honoring something because it is important to you, and worship is when you perform a service to something that has power so that you will receive something in return.


7

As the Rambam codifies in Hilchos Avoda Zara 3:5, only four activities are "objectively" idolatry when done in honor of something other than G-d, and forbidden to do to any idol. 1) Prostration, 2) Animal Sacrifice, 3) Incense burning, 4) Libations. Outside of those four things, it is only idolatry if done as part of the normal service of the idol. So an ...


3

Tallis -- this is easy. The halachic default is that everyone 13 and up should be wearing a Tallis; Ashkenazi never-married-men happen to have a custom otherwise. (Rabbi Meiselman, for instance, feels this whole custom is in error and his unmarried sons wear tallisos.) In absence of such a custom, we default to the standard -- wear a Tallis. Hair covering ...


4

Nitei Gavriel - Shiduchim V'Tanaim - page 360 - 32:4 actually brings a few different Minhagim. 1 - The mothers break the plate 2 - The fathers break the plate 3 - The Chassan and the two fathers break one plate and the Kallah and the two mothers break a second plate. He does not give any reason as to why those that do it in any particular fashion, do it ...


3

The reason for the custom is that according to those who understand these matters, Monday and Thursday are Yemei Rotzon, days of added Divine "favor", and Shabbos afternoon is also known in Kabbala as a time of Raava d'Raavin, a time of extreme Divine favor. So it is seen as especially auspicious to have one's first aliya during that more Jewishly ...


3

After a basic review of the sources, I would say that the basic answer to your questions are: No, there is no source that says that we have to cover our mouths when we yawn to avoid evil spirits entering our bodies. In fact, to my knowledge, there is no source that says that one is required to do so at all except in prayer. No, the only reason found in ...


3

The custom of covering your mouth while yawning is common in several cultures, but so far, from searching secular sources, I have not found any such customs or requirements with Jewish origins. In Yawning: comparative study of knowledge and beliefs, popular and medical, O. Walusinski writes: According to [Pierre] Saintyves, Islam sees yawning as a sign ...


0

It's a din in Hilchos Derech Eretz. It's manners.


4

Rebi would cover his mouth when yawning during prayers. Brachos 24a-b: אמר ר' חנינא אני ראיתי את רבי שגיהק ופיהק ונתעטש ורק וממשמש בבגדו אבל לא היה מתעטף וכשהוא מפהק היה מניח ידו על סנטרו


10

שלחן ערוך סימן צז סעיף א (titled: "שלא יגהק ושלא יפהק בשעת התפלה," "Not to yawn during prayers") לא יגהק (מוציא מגופו לפיו נפיחה מתוך שובעו, רייטי"ר בלע"ז). ולא יפהק (פותח פיו להוציא רוח הפה) ואם צריך לפהק מתוך אונס יניח ידו על פיו שלא תראה פתיחתו. Do not burp or yawn [during prayers]; and if one must yawn, one should cover his mouth with his ...


2

R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi writes 32:63: והגאונים אמרו שהבתים של ראש צריך להיות אצבעים על אצבעים לכתחילה ואם פיחת לא פסל The Gaonim (The Shimusha Rabba) writes that the Battim have to be two fingers by two fingers Lechatchila, but if they're smaller they're not Passul. R' Shenur Zalman of Liadi writes 32:58: ד' בתים של ראש צריכים להיות מעור אחד שנאמר ...


0

According to Rambam Laws of Idol Worship it is forbidden as it is considered "ornamenting oneself with a man's ornaments": יא [י] לא תעדה אישה עדי האיש, כגון שתשים בראשה מצנפת או כובע, או שתלבוש שריון וכיוצא בו, או שתגלח ראשה כאיש; ... הכול, כמנהג המדינה. A woman shall not ornament herself with a man's ornaments, for example a ritual head wrap or ...


4

I believe there is no standard form of celebration. However, at Orthodox shuls it is normal to sponsor a kiddush on Shabbos morning, for all kinds of celebrations or remembrances. I've seen converts celebrate by sponsoring a kiddush (as is typically done when a baby girl is born). If the convert is a man, he will most likely receive an aliyah for the first ...


2

Public acknowledgement of conversion must walk a balance; on the one hand we are not supposed to call out converts (we do not remind him of his former status), but on the other hand, a transition has occurred that affects this person's participation in the community. In the congregations I'm familiar with, the convert receives an aliyah at first reasonable ...


3

Excerpt from this article: To avoid fights, many places allow all the Avelim (mourners) to say Kaddish (prayer said on behalf of the deceased) together. However, they must say it together word-for-word, for two voices saying the same thing in unison are not heard, except for something heard infrequently that is very dear to the listener. Kaddish ...


4

The proper way to do it would be to sa kaddish according to the nussach of the shul. The reason for that being, that "al titosh metoras imecha" does not apply when davining in such a shul (at least for the things you need a minjan for, for everything else one is allowed to follow ones own nussach). There is also a Gemore in Pesachim 52 "al yeschaneh adam ...


1

Several of my friends and I, myself, did an informal proposal at the girl's parents' home, at the point that he was interested. I suggest doing this, of course, if there is a high assumption that the girl will agree, otherwise, everyone is in for a lot of embarrassment. Part of doing this, is that it is considered courteous to inform the parents and ...


6

In some more "Yeshivish" circles (this was pretty normal among my crowd in Yeshiva), the custom is to propose with a bracelet, not a ring, and it is usually done with some formulation of "will you marry me." If the "question" is asked, people are careful to do so without any witnesses, to prevent the marriage taking halachic effect. The kneeling thing is ...


1

An historical source for the most common minhag of six hours from early Ashkenazi sources. The Trumas Hadeshen in his gloss on the Shaarei Durah siman 76 #2 says that waiting one hour was an invention by the people who wanted to make a pshara between the opinion in the rishonim which holds that after ending a meal and making a bracha achrona one can have ...


3

ויהי חתת אלקים על הערים - בראשית לה:ה On the above Pasuk, R' Zevin relates a story titled "The Secret Weapon" in "Sipurei Tzadikim al hatorah" as follows: Late in 1856, Reb Menachem Mendel of Lubavitch (known as the Tzemach Tzedek) sent his son Reb Shmuel - who was later to succeed him as rebbe - to S. Petersburg on matters of communal concern. ...


3

Re: Sephardim Although the Shulkhan arukh sets the waiting period at 6 hours, in the introduction the Bet Yosef writes that if anything he writes in this book contradicts a pre-existing custom in your community, you should keep that custom. So, while the popular practice among Sephardim is to wait 6 hours, it should surprise no one if there are ...



Top 50 recent answers are included