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I think this book might be a useful resource: A Treasury of Sephardic Laws and Customs by Herbert C. Dobrinsky http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0881250317/ref=gno_cart_title_0?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A33AYO0FZG6YH


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There is an interesting Wikipedia article describing different payot styles. "As Yishai mentioned, above, "aruf" means "up" so this refers to payot that are behind the ear vs. hanging down. It could be either tied up and put under the kippah or curled around the ear. According to the wiki article this is considered the common "Litvish" / yeshivish style. ...


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I don't think that there is any specific rule regarding the mechitzah placement. The Bet Hamikdash (Temple in Jerusalem) had a women's "gallery" which was like a balcony. From my understanding, most "European" fashioned shuls (synagogues) had a women's balcony. In NYC as well as many other U.S. cities where large shul buildings were constructed in the early ...


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Mishna Brura סימן צו ס"ק ז: " נפל ספר על הארץ ואינו יכול לכוין מותר להגביהו כשיסיים הברכה שהוא עומד בה ואי לא"ה לא יפסיק ". It says that only if you can't keep on focus the prayer you need to pick it up immediately, but by the way we learn that you should pick it up immediately if it's not during a prayer. To kiss it is a 'Hidur'. BTW, Sefer Hasidim says ...


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See Elya Rabba siman 260 from ois 5 up untill and including siff 7. There are two similar traditions concerning finger skipping, one starting from the right hand & one starting from the left. The Rabbis who quote either one seem to take it as a definite importance to start with the hand mentioned. It might be Kabalistic. He also brings the point that the ...


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FWIW, there are some cases, e.g., in מודים, where even if one is not saying it one must bow along with everyone else, so as not to appear to disagree with what is being said (נראה ככופר). Source is in משנה ברורה and ערוך השלחן, both in אורח חיים, סימן ק״ט: ערוך השלחן: ...שצריך לשחות עם הציבור ב"מודים", שלא יהא נראה ככופר למי שהציבור משתחוים לו ...


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Mourning in Halacha, p 277 says: Some follow a custom of formally terminating the Shiva by having the mourners walk outside together – or around the corner - accompanied by the comforters. Symbolically this is explained as representing the mourner's re-emergence into society from which he had withdrawn during the Shiva week. Others ascribe ...


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As discussed here the Lubavitcher Rebbe equates both readings - if you are reading it one way on one occasion, you should be consistent on all occasions. This is the Chabad custom.


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(1). It's not that recent. The באר היטב in סימן תצג - דינים הנוהגים בימי העמר says: רק לעשות שמחות יתירות בריקודין ומחולות נהגו איסור. מ''א וח''י ע''ש So a source would be the Magen Avraham who died in 1682. As you see, the issue is dancing, so any music that is not conducive to dancing should - in theory - be permissible. Since cappella is not ...


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I've been in one shul where they have found a compromise, if you can call it that. The shul wasn't as much concerned about the pronunciation issue of "zecher" as much as it was concerned about questions of repeating verses either in whole or in part. (There are various opinions regarding this, and different people in the congregation would "argue" about this ...


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Rabbi Moshe Feinstein writes in the Igros Moshe Orach Chaim vol 5 siman 20 subsection 32 that it is more important to repeat it when reading it in parshas Ki Seitzei than in parshas Zachor. But, just for the record, the Vilna Gaon also repeated it during Ashrei, and no one seems to have accepted that practice.


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The only source that exists for the Zeicher/Zecher reading is the Mishna Berura, as discussed here. He only mentions this stringency for parshat Zechor, and not for parshat Ki Teitzei. As to your assertion that many have a minhag of saying both - I'm not convinced that it's accurate. For a start Sefardim and Yekkes have not adpated this Safek. BTW: Rabbi ...


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The answer would depend on what is considered acceptable in the community where you are collecting. If the average collector got e.g. 25% than you would have to inform the giver if you were to take more. If the prevailing attitude is that any percentage is OK as long as it meets the requirements described in the link you provided than that would be OK too. ...


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The first record of Yom Kippur Kattan is in the Pri Chadash (Rabbi Chizkiya De-Saluha) to Orach Chaim 417. He attributes it as a custom from the Kabbalist known as the Ramak (Rabbi Moshe Cordovero - the generation before the Arizal). The original custom is primarily about fasting, with some additions of Slichos, etc. which developed. Today, due to the ...


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In SA OC 607 the Magen Avraham brings two reasons for this custom: 1) The Ari Z"L says that one should pound on their chest 2) A Medrish Kohelet that says "We bang on our hearts to show that that it (the heart) is what lead us astray" Now I think both sources are expressing the same idea BUT in this case perhaps we can say that - According to the ARI Z"L ...


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Ha Rav Riskin mentioned the following, in regard to a somewhat different question on women's minyanim. There are some authorities - including my teacher and mentor, Rav Soloveitchik ztz"l - who maintain that since a Sefer Torah cannot become "tamei" (ritually impure), a woman may also read from a Sefer Torah, but without the order of aliyot and berakhot ...


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Here is what comes to mind: Someone who is a lefty puts his Tefillin on his right arm, even though his Tefillin will not face the heart. Moreover, Nishmas Avraham Orach Chaim 27:1 brings down that someone who is right handed and who has dextocardia (heart on right side of the chest) still puts his Tefillin on the left arm, and the fact that his Tefillin ...



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