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10

The Talmud (Berakhot 13b) is the original source for this custom. Here there is a mention of Rabbi Judah the Prince covering his eyes while he said the Shema to block out the distractions of the students around him. This behavior was codified in the Shulhan Arukh (OH 61:4-5). from ...


9

Rasash Pesachim 53a writes that if a community's custom is not to eat roasted meat on the evening of 15 Iyar for the same reason it is not eaten on the night of Pesach, then they should not eat it. He writes that even in a community which doesn't have this custom, eating a full roasted lamb in the manner of the Korban Pesach would remain prohibited as that ...


9

He is the Kaliver Rebbe. [Rabbi] Menachem Mendel Taub (born 1923) is the Rebbe of the Kaliv Hasidic dynasty. Born in Transylvania in 1923, he is seventh in a direct paternal line to the founder of the dynasty, Rabbi Yitzchak Izak of Kaliv, a disciple of the Rebbe Reb Elimelech of Lizhensk. An extremely talented Rabbi who recently moved his headquarters ...


8

The Mishna Brurah 610:16 says women customarily wear white and clean clothes. Not sure what people do today.


7

This minhag is mentioned much earlier than the Taz, in the sefer עמק ברכה, by Rav Avraham Horowitz (1550-1615), in a gloss by his son, the Shelah Hakodosh: Some people are accustomed to spit during Aleinu, but they don't know why they spit, and the majority of people nowadays do not understand Loshon Hakodesh at all and spit when they say "and we bow ...


7

Rav Herschel Schachter told me that the reason they do it is because they are afraid that a hair will be left out of the mikveh when they do tevila. To avoid this problem they shave their heads. I have also heard that they suspect that there will be tangles, which are חציצה for the tevila, so they shave their heads. Neither of these reasons would really ...


7

The rationale behind it is that Tehillim describes a lifetime as seventy years in the verse ימי שנותינו בהם שבעים שנה ואם בגבורות שמונים שנה (90:10.) Thus -- the reasoning goes -- 83 is 13 years into your "second lifetime" which is as good an excuse for a kiddush as any. I do not know of any source for it prior to the twentieth century or of any book ...


7

Nitei Gavriel Taspores 2:1:2 says the source of those who do it at 2 is based on Braishis 21:8 "Vayigdal Hayeled" and Rashi says that was at 24 months. Also Shmuel-1 1:22.


7

Orach Chaim 224:12 Beer Haitaiv 8 says the reason that either grass or stone is placed on the grave is as a honor for the person buried there, as it shows that people came to his grave. There is no mention as to placing more than or less than one.


7

Bach - Tur Orach Chaim 38 - 6 says that he saw a Maaseh Rav from a Rav Weiss Z'L who would say these 2 Parshios while he was wearing Tefilin. This would indicate to me that it is only a Minhag and not a Halacha.


7

I believe that the earliest source is in the Book of Yossipon (top of this page): ויאמר הכהן אל המלך הזהב אשר נדבו שפתיך תנהו למחית כהני אלהינו לעניי הכהנים אשר יולדו בשנה הזאת בכל יהודה ובכל ארץ ירושלם יקראו כשמך אלכסנדר ויהי לך לזכרון כאשר יבאו לעבוד את עבודת אלהינו בבית הזה כי אין לנו לקבל בבית אלהיגו פסל וכל תמונה ויעש המלך כן ויתן את הזהב ...


6

The rule of thumb Rabbi Moshe Feinstein applies is to not be disruptive. In communities where it is clearly the standard practice that all men wear tallitot, I would think that doing otherwise would be disruptive and/or disrespectful. (And what's the downside, really?) As for what text you yourself use, as long as you're not too loud, generally people ...


6

Achdus does not mean we all have the same menu, Achdus means we care and lookout for each other. Imagine a family where each member takes different medications and someone comes along and says 'why don't you have Achdus?' 'Get all your doctors together and come up with medications that is equal for all!' The Achdus that got us the Torah in the first place ...


6

Rav Shmuel Kamenetsky in Kovetz Halchos pg 129 writes that a woman is obligated to drink a rivies of wine on Purim,and she can fulfill this obligation with grape juice(see footnote231). In footnote 230 he holds that since women are obligated in all the mitzvos if the day they are also obligated in drinking a little wine,but to drink alot of wine is an issur ...


6

The prayer is mentioned in the gemara Berachos 60b, a prayer asking for the angels who accompany him to wait for him while he goes to the bathroom*. It is brought in the beginning of Shulchan Aruch Siman 3, but it says there that nowadays we are not accustomed to say it. The Mishnah Berurah there explains that the reason is because we do not assume that we ...


6

Nefesh HaChaim Shaar Gimmel Perek Beis(1): אבל אדון כל ית"ש הוא מלא את כל העולמות והנבראי' ואינם חוצצים חלילה נגדו יתב' כלל באמת. ואין עוד מלבדו ית' ממש שום דבר כלל בכל העולמות. מהעליון שבעליונים עד התהום התחתון שבתהומות הארץ. עד שתוכל לומר שאין כאן שום נברא ועולם כלל רק הכל מלא עצמות אחדותו הפשוט ית"ש. Perek Gimmel(2): שאם ח"ו יקחנו לבנו לקבוע לנו ...


6

The Babylonian Talmud (Yoma 53b) states that one should bow to one's left first: המתפלל צריך שיפסיע שלש פסיעות לאחוריו ואחר כך יתן שלום ואם לא עשה כן ראוי לו שלא התפלל ומשום שמעיה אמרו שנותן שלום לימין ואחר כך לשמאל שנאמר מימינו אש דת למו ואומר יפול מצדך אלף ורבבה מימינך מאי ואומר וכי תימא אורחא דמילתא היא למיתב בימין ת"ש יפול מצדך אלף ורבבה מימינך רבא ...


6

The rationale behind this is that if the straps turn over, the black will still show. Call it Frum marketing. See Mishnah Berurah 33:21 and Ohr Zaruah 564 - this is the view of Rambam, though we don't accustom ourselves to do this! The Shevet Halevi 9:16 disapproved - none of the Gedolim did this until now! Kikar Shabbat reports that R' Eliashiv refused to ...


6

According to the Art Scroll Siddur bend the knees at kor'im (bend the knee), bend at the waist at mishtachavim (bow) and straighten up after modim (acknowledge) before lifnei melelech. I do not know where Rabbi Nosson Scherman got the original psak that this is the method. It is also the way that I was taught to daven in cheder (lo those many years ago) but ...


6

Firstly: What makes you think that Sheitels are a recent development? See the Gemara in Sanhedrin 112a: בעי רב יוסף שיער נשים צדקניות מהו אמר רבא הא דרשעיות אסור (דברים יג) תקבץ ושרפת כתיב מי שאינו מחוסר אלא קביצה ושריפה יצא זה שמחוסר תלישה וקביצה ושריפה אלא אמר רבא בפיאה נכרית היכי דמי אי דמחובר בגופה כגופה דמיא לא צריכא דתלי בסיבטא כנכסי צדיקים שבתוכה ...


5

There was in minhag in the Alt-Neu Shul in Prague of saying Mizmor Shir L'Yom Ha Shabbat twice on Friday evenings. This psalm (Song for the Sabbath Day) is usually recited toward the end of the Kabbalat Shabbat service. Traditionally, reciting this psalm was the point when the worshiper began to observe the restrictions of Shabbat. This created a conflict ...


5

שו"ת יחווה דעת, חלק ב סימן עא discusses this and concludes that since it is commonly done there is no reason to suspend the Minhag.


5

The Magen Avraham in Shuchan Aruch siman 53:4 says that an individual who reaches Yishtabach should say it right away.


5

The Talmud talks about having shushbinin -- close friends -- escort the bride and groom, to the point that someone who was shushbin at your wedding can't testify in court about you, as the personal connection is too tight. What is still found today is having one good friend (each) serve as "honor escort", (shomer) for the bride/groom: for a day or two ...


5

The Ben Ish Chai (Parshat Nitzavim 3, Parshat Vayelech 8) says they should.


5

As pointed out, the general policy is that unmarried women not go to mikvah because that could cause them to do things they shouldn't. There are different practices with regards to immersion pre high holidays; as Chanoch said, the Ben Ish Chai (a Baghdad rabbi about 200 years ago) said they should. If I recall correctly, there are different customs within ...


5

What I'd seen around the blogosphere was that it was an innovation by "Rabbi" (he was never formally ordained) Shraga Feivel Mendolowitz intended for Torah UMesorah community day schools that were open on Chol Hamoed (probably in the 1960s, I assume). Some of the students were not observant and didn't have a sukkah at home, so they'd take class trips to see ...


5

While I've yet to see a source that says that one shouldn't bow, sources that say that one should include the following (in rough chronological order): • Emek Berakha (§40, here), by R' Avraham ben Shabbetai Horowitz, with notes by his son, the Shnei Luchot haBrit. No reason is provided for the bowing, save that the whole host of heaven is listening. • ...


5

This is a difficult question to answer (especially because I'm not quite clear on what you're asking). I'll offer a few observations (sorry for the length! summary at the bottom): First, with regards to the Qabbala and Sufism — they are separate systems, and each have many different varieties and interpretations depending on time and place. With that said, ...


5

Although perhaps there is a Sefer that discusses this, I am not aware of it. However my father would go in order of age, oldest to youngest, first all the boys and then all the girls. My father in law would do it in order of age, oldest to youngest mixing the boys and girls. So I guess there are at least 2 different ways that people do it.



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