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It is not the case that a ruling in the Talmud will always overcome any possible custom developed later. In Talmudic times, there was no customary prohibition of kitniyot. Rav Huna, in the quote, is giving an example of what may be used as the two cooked dishes, even though of course other simple dishes would be fine as well. And he specifies orez (which ...


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Per Rabbi Shraga Simmons at About.com: Question: Why do male Chasidic Jews have the long side curls in their hair? Answer: The Torah says, "You shall not round off the peyos of your head" (Leviticus 19:27). The word peyos refers to sideburns -- i.e. the hair in front of the ears that extends to underneath the cheekbone which is level with the ...


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I am a Jew of Spanish Morrocan ancestry - my father always told me that Moroccons and actal Spanish Jews never ate kitniyot including rice itself unless they were fresh and green - the reason -Spain was close to Ashkenaz and the gzeira of kitniyot crossed the border and true Sepharadic Jews (Spanish as opposed to Jews of Arab lands) accepted the gzeira, as ...


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Curious about Kitniyot? While we don’t know exactly when this minhag began, one of the earliest sources to mention the custom is the Sefer Mitzvot Katan, written by Rabbi Yitzchak of Courville (France, 1210-1280). Rabbi Yitzchak writes that some communities have the custom of not eating kitniyot during Pesach, even though these items are clearly ...



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