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7

It's from the Talmud (Pesachim 53b) with the reason given as "for it looks like he is consecrating his animal and consuming an offering outside [of the Temple]". The Shulchan Arukh codifies it as well (OC 469). (The Arukh haShulchan (ibid. :4) notes that the Rambam did not codify this rule, and thinks that he omitted it because he thought it only was true ...


4

The source is Shulchan Oruch Orach Chayim 487 (4) בליל ראשון של פסח גומרים את ההלל בצבור בנעימה בברכה תחלה וסוף ובן בליל שני של שני ימים טובים של גליות On the first night of Pesach, we complete the Hallel with the community with a pleasant tune and a blessing at the beginning and end. The same is on the second night outside Israel. The Rema ...


4

“Gebrokts”: Wetted Matzah goes into detail on the provenance of this minhag and explains why chabad does not use it. While speaking with baalei batim who are members of chabad, I have been told that many people will keep the matzah in plastic bags when eating it so as not to get crumbs on the table that might get wet. The source for the minhag is from ...


3

The Steipler kept his chassidish tefillin but bought Rav Chaim Ashkenaz Tefillin, although the steiplers father was a hornsteipler (chernoybl) chossid, the steipler learnt in navordok, a litvishe yehsiva and married THE litvish'e gadols sister (Chazon Ish's sister). I am pretty sure he continued to wear a gartel (but then again so did the chazon ish, it ...


3

Chabad does not eat Matza or Matza meal that has come in contact with water during the first seven days of passover. They do eat it on the 8th day of Passover outside of Eretz Yisroel. A source in English is here. The footnotes have the primary sources.


2

This says that gebrochts was a private neder. "He did not eat gebrochts but allowed his family to do so. Because of this, his meals were prepared in special keilim separate from the rest of the family’s keilim. In his old age, when it was hard for him to eat matzoh unless it was soaked in water, he was matir neder and ate gebrochts as well. ...


2

There are many questions here, but all quite interesting. Where did the idea of paying a shadchan come from? Is it an obligation? This depends on the community The first shidduch in Jewish history (Eliezer finding Rivka for Yitzhak) doesn't mention a fee and dinonline writes that the Sephardi custom is that "the shadchan traditionally receives no ...


2

It is not a Passover custom. You are speaking of the normal Shabbat and Yom Tov candelabra. There is a custom cited by Mishnah Berurah 263:6 to light seven or ten candles. This could be a reason why silversmiths make seven branched candelabras beside the custom referred to below. A woman lights candles for her family before Shabbat and Yom Tov. The custom ...


2

They are nothing to do with one another. Eating only shmura matzah is a chumra (stringency) to be absolutely sure the flour is not chometz. Not eating gebrokts is a minhag (custom), mainly adopted by - although not exclusively - chassidic Jews. I think hotel etc. marketing is primarily responsible for convincing everyone that it is a chumra - since many ...


1

Does chabad eat gebrochts? I point out that because this is a rabbinic prohibition and a minhag of stringency, the last day of Pesach is used to show that it is not a full prohibition of Chametz. There is also a spiritual meaning to this. It appears that the eating the gebruchts in Chutz La'aretz is the significant point because the last day of Pesach is ...


1

The obligation for women to drink 4 cups like men from the Gemoro in Pesochim 108b. ת"ר: הכל חייבין בארבעה כוסות הללו, אחד אנשים ואחד נשים Reasons given are that although women are exempt from time-bound mitzvos, here women were also involved in the miracles. Further it was in their merit that we were redeemed and they also suffered the enslavement ...


1

Everyone eats "shmura" (guarded) matza. The question arises at what point the wheat or the flour must be guarded to ensure that it has not become wet and possibly turned into chametz. Once someone determines that they are following a particular level of shimur, then they can determine if they will or will not eat "gebrochts" because of the possibility that ...


1

While the answerers who preceded me are correct that this seems no different from the regular candelabrum for any other holiday or Shabas, I'll note that Shulchan Aruch (472:2) says: He should set his table (for the seder on Pesach) with nice receptacles to the extent of his ability. Magen Avraham (paraphrased also in Mishna B'rura) explains: All ...


1

I think that the answer is "simpler" than what sabbahillel mentioned. In the picture, I see a total of 8 "cups". I know that this may sound strange, but, I have seen some people use an 8 cup menorah rather than the 9 cup one that you commonly see. The 9th cup is for the shamash, and some people don't specifically place this on the menorah at all. Some ...


1

There are a number of suggested answers why it is permitted to speak, provided that some (or all) of the following conditions are met: the aron hakodesh is built in a way that the Sefer Torah is placed ten tefachim or higher above the ground; it’s done b’derech ara’i (temporarily); it’s done for k’vod hatzibbur (out of respect for the community); or ...



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