Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

To answer the final question, the Baal HaTurim to Bereishis 45:26 writes that ויגדו of "ויגדו לו לאמר" when the brothers (or Serach) told Yaakov that Yosef was alive is missing a yud (it should be ויגידו) is because they didn't tell him until they opened (undid) the excommunication. He cites Pirkei D'Rebbi Eliezer 38.


1

In Kovetz Sichos vol. 2 R' Nosson Meir Wachtfogel explains as follows: A dream's meaning depends on its interpretation (Berachos 55b). A positive interpretation yields a positive fulfillment, and the same with a negative interpretation. When Pharaoh's advisors offered him interpretations, he rejected them because they were undesirable, and so he insisted ...


3

I heard the following approach from R' Rivlin, Mashgiach of Kerem b'Yavneh. Pharaoh was looking for more than just a clever interpretation based on the art of dream interpretation - he was looking for an interpreter who showed himself to know what the dream was and meant. Pharaoh made slight changes in his relating of the dream, and Yosef identified this ...


1

I don't think that this is anything more than language / grammar. In the first 5, the rules are stated in noun or "title" form - like headlines. It is like saying, "These are the rules from which we can derive..." From A, From B... etc. - They are not describing how these rules work; they are just telling you the name of the rule, and assuming that you know ...


4

The Y'fe Soar (commentary to the Midrash Raba 89:6) explains that Pharaoh saw the interpretation of the dream in the dream itself but forgot it. Since this interpretation didn't remind him of the one he'd seen, he knew it was wrong. Y'de Moshe (commentary to the Midrash Raba there) explains that this interpretation didn't fit the dream very well, to ...


0

Here's my take on it. Pharaoh wasn't satisfied with a prophecy of "you'll have seven daughters and they'll all die" because he didn't want them to die, for obvious reasons. Also, as Matt commented, his dream was about grain, and that has nothing to do with his daughters. Yosef's interpretation fits with both options. For the second, that is about grain and ...


11

The Maharal (Gur Aryeh ibid) explains that the Gemara which says that a person will surely die in a pit full of snakes and scorpions is only when it is full of snakes and scorpions, but this pit just had a few. The Ohr HaChaim explains that the brothers felt Yosef was deserving of death because he had testified falsely about them to their father in matters ...


0

They knew that they were destined to become a great nation (Bris Bain Habesarim) and the brochos of Avraham, Yitzchak, and Yaakov. They felt that Yosef (with his dreams of rulership) was going to destroy this and was to them what Eisav was to Yaakov. As a court, they felt that Yosef was actually chayav misah and that they had actually shown him mercy by ...


2

Rashi's quote from the text is "את-אמתה" so his question must arise from within the quote or from the quote's relationship with the context. He may have been dissatisfied with understanding the quote as 'her handmaiden' because that would raised the following questions: 1) Why does the text specify who was sent? (It was 'only' a maidservant, after all. ...


0

See Why Didn't Yosef tell Yaakov He was Still Alive? A non-literal reading of the medrish would be that the family dynamics created a situation where revealing the truth would help no one (and likely hurt).


1

I'm guessing he was not quoting verbatim and he mixed two medrashim as I will show you. He also seems to have misquoted the one you are looking for. Here is a first quote from him. "More deeply, the Midrash in Breshit Rabbah converts Jacob's vow from a request for supplying his needs to an obligation that he accepted upon himself toward God. Thus: If God ...



Top 50 recent answers are included