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The short answer to this question is that the midrashim read history backwards. That is, since we know, for example, that Yishmael is not chosen over Yitzchak to be the "carrier" of God's blessing and promise to Avraham, the author of the midrash assumes that there must have been something undeserving in him or he must have done something wrong. Therefore, ...


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Like Avi said, this is called an Asmachta (אסמכתא), usually translated as "hints." The Talmud uses these is many cases, both for laws which are DeOraita (mentioned in the Torah) and DeRabbannan (rabbinic). For the DeOraita, the hint is used a memory device to remember the law. For the DeRabbannan, the are several opinions why the rabbis did this. Some ...


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Rabbi Menashe Klein writes in his מגיד משנה, that the houses of both the righteous and the sinners (whether tattlers or misers) can be afflicted with צרעת. Whether treasure will be found depends on whether or not the owner is righteous. Onlookers would have no way of knowing whether the צרעת has come to punish or to reward. That way, the sinner would be ...


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When we learned the parsha our rav explained that there are different reasons for a house getting tzora'as. The reason of lashon hara is as specified by the Rambam shown in the question is only one of the possibilities. Another possibility is that it comes to punish stinginess See link In identifying the reason that Tzoraas came upon a person’s house, ...


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R' Tzvi Hirsch Chayos in Mavo HaTalmud writes about various midrashic methodologies employed by Chazal in the Gemara and Midrash. In the twenty-first chapter, he discusses this tendency to identify a person mentioned in Tanach with someone else in Tanach, or to equate two names as belonging to the same person (e.g. "הוא מלאכי הוא עזרא"). Chayos treats this ...


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The reason why Moses mouth got burned was to atone for the milk of the non jewish women that touched his tongue. His hand did not get burned because it did not require atonement. I saw this in some book, i think Vedibarta Bam.


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I can't give you all sources, but a brief summary of the Rambam: The Rambam discusses two types of derashos. In his Introduction to the Talmud, the Rambam discusses derashos in which the halacha is not in dispute, just the scriptural source is - the drasha is merely an attempt to identify the source, and the halacha preceded the source. An example is the ...


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I have a secondary source reference for you from Mircea Eliade's 'Cosmos and History', Bollingen, 1959, p 17: According to the Syrian Book of the Cave of Treasures, Adam was created at the center of the earth, at the same spot where the Cross of Christ was later to be set up. The same traditions have been preserved by Judaism. The Jewish apocalypse ...


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Targum Pseudo Jonathan to Genesis 2:15 - ודבר השם אלקים ית אדם מן טור פולחנא אתר דאתבריא מתמן ואשריה בגינוניתא דעדן...‏ And God took Adam from the mountain of worship, the place from which he was created, and put him in the Garden of Eden Pirush Yonatan says this refers to mount Moriah, the Temple Mount Targum on Chronicles II 3:1 describing ...


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The Gemara in Sanhedrin 38(a-b) says: אמר רב אושעיא משמיה דרב: אדם הראשון גופו מבבל, וראשו מארץ ישראל, ואבריו משאר ארצות, עגבותיו א"ר אחא מאקרא דאגמא Adam's body was created from earth of Babel (which is why it is so low - the depression was created by molding his body), his head from the land of Israel, his limbs from all other countries, etc. ...


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In the 'Litvish' genre, you can't go wrong with Be'er Yosef. It's easier to read than Hirsch, and slightly longer than classic Likkutim such Maayoneh Shel Torah, Gra, Gan Ravah, Apirion, etc. Lekach Tov is always a classic, too, especially if you're looking for one with a bit of a lesson.



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