Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

The Gur Arye explains that Y'hoshua's falling into the spies' plot would reflect poorly on Moshe, whose protege he was. This reasoning doesn't apply to Kalev. The Avodas Yisrael explains (not in answer to this question) that Y'hoshua did not want the honor of leading the people, and wanted Moshe to retain that position. (See Rashi to B'haalos'cha 11:28.) ...


7

It is important to understand that there is more than one way that a scriptural passage might be brought, to which your question may have already deliberately alluded. You refer to passages being brought as proof and also as providing solidity. These are not the same thing. In the Mishna, most of the legislation lacks a stated explanation, but amongst those ...


6

Midrash Tehillim on mizmor 3 - see it here 3 lines from the top of the page. דבר אחר מזמור לדוד בברחו. זהו שאמר הכתוב לא ידע אנוש ערכה איוב כח יג), אמר רבי אלעזר לא ניתנו פרשיותיה של תורה על הסדר, שאס ניתנו על חםדר, כל מי שהוא קןרא בהם היה יכול להחיות מתים, ולעשות מופתים, לכך נתעלמה סדורה של תורה וכו The parshiyos of the Torah were not given ...


5

In the Chumash העמק דבר , introduction to the Sefer Vayikro, the Netziv says “there are many droshos and halochos which Chazal did not learn in the Sifro through some difficulty in the biblical text but because of the traditions that they had from the Oral law” and this occurs frequently in Vayikro. He further says, “there is no tradition that is ...


5

R' Tzvi Hirsch Chayos in Mavo HaTalmud writes about various midrashic methodologies employed by Chazal in the Gemara and Midrash. In the twenty-first chapter, he discusses this tendency to identify a person mentioned in Tanach with someone else in Tanach, or to equate two names as belonging to the same person (e.g. "הוא מלאכי הוא עזרא"). Chayos treats this ...


5

Among Rishonim, the Meiri often explains aggadah, and the Rashba wrote a commentary specifically on aggadeta. The sefer Ein Eliyahu is a multi-volume commentary on aggadah. Many aggadeta are also discussed by the Chida in his פתח עינים. R. Moshe Tzuriel also collected many commentaries on aggadah in his Leket Peirushei Aggadah See also this article, ...


5

Although the word זנב does sometimes mean a tail, it is actually a generic word. This is how the ספר הערוך defines it: כל דבר שהוא יתר שאינו כמדת חברו משתנה מכמות שהוא ממה שהעולם נוהג קרוי זנב - anything which is extra or which is not the same size as the adjoining one or which is different from what is usual elsewhere, is called a זנב. Therefore a suitable ...


5

There is a book that you might enjoy, titled פירוש על כמה אגדות, which was first published by descendants of the Gra in Vilna, 1800. It comprises the Gra's commentary on the Rabbah bar Bar-Chanah stories (Bava Batra 73a-74a) and the Savei deVei Atuna riddles ("the riddles of the elders of Athens"; Bechorot 8b, Avodah Zarah 11b and Yoma 9b). It has been ...


5

A Midrashic Reading: Abraham lived in a culture that accepted the concept of a god as a given, just not the concept of one god. It was within that framework, (where the concept of deities was undisputed), that he logically presented monotheism. This is his argument, seen in Gen Rabah 38:13: נסביה ומסריה לנמרוד א"ל נסגוד לנורא א"ל אברהם ונסגוד למיא ...


5

The Kli Yakar there asks this question on the Midrash, and explains that although the bull understood from the very beginning that his going to the Ba'al would result in a sanctification of Hashem's name - it was nonetheless hesitant to go, as it was worried that by going over to the side of impurity it would become negatively affected. The bull therefore ...


5

Targum Pseudo Jonathan to Genesis 2:15, ודבר השם אלקים ית אדם מן טור פולחנא אתר דאתבריא מתמן ואשריה בגינוניתא דעדן...‏ And God took Adam from the mountain of worship, the place from which he was created, and put him in the Garden of Eden Pirush Yonatan says this refers to mount Moriah, the Temple Mount Targum Pseudo Jonathan Genesis 22:2, ...


5

The short answer to this question is that the midrashim read history backwards. That is, since we know, for example, that Yishmael is not chosen over Yitzchak to be the "carrier" of God's blessing and promise to Avraham, the author of the midrash assumes that there must have been something undeserving in him or he must have done something wrong. Therefore, ...


4

In the Yerushalmi (Shekalim 1:3), Rav Yochanan ben Zakkai's position that the tribe of Levi was obligated to give the annual half-Shekel Temple tax is derived from the verse (Exodus 30:13) זה יתנו where זה is 12 in Gematria, implying all 12 tribes need to give the tax. Rambam (Shekalim 1:7) rules like this opinion.


4

Targum Yonasan ben Uziel Braishis 46:17 says that Serach was the one who told Yaakov that Yosef was alive. There is no mention there of a harp. Rashi Shmuel2 20:19 mentions in the name of Medrash Agada that Serach was the one who told Yaakov that Yosef was alive. Again there is no mention there of a harp. Sefer Mayim Rabim in the name of Pirkei Drav ...


4

This answer is taken mostly from this shiur by R. Ezra Bick from VBM I just want to point out that this Midrash is not saying what Mideval logicians used to argue about Gd's existence. While the argument here is similar to the watchmaker argument it is also very different. But first, we need to quote the entire Midrash, not just a small part of it: ...


4

The Gemara in Sanhedrin 38(a-b) says: אמר רב אושעיא משמיה דרב: אדם הראשון גופו מבבל, וראשו מארץ ישראל, ואבריו משאר ארצות, עגבותיו א"ר אחא מאקרא דאגמא Adam's body was created from earth of Babel (which is why it is so low - the depression was created by molding his body), his head from the land of Israel, his limbs from all other countries, etc. ...


3

Chazal in many places say something like "the real name of x is y", followed by the question "so why was he called x?" - "to teach you something important about him that cannot be learned from his given name". The explanation of all this is that a person's given name is supposed to reflect his essential being, but some people do not 'live up to their name' ...


3

Based on the the Sefer Zikaron (I didn't look it up) and the Sefer HaShoreshim LeHaRadak (entry אֲמָה), the Chumash Shai LeMorah says that there are some who say the correct version is with a dagesh in the mem. (He says that R' Sadeya Gaon says so, and R' Hai Gaon brings both versions.) If that is the case, it seems that Rashi brings the Midrash in order to ...


3

Rashi's modus operandi is NOT just to bring peshat. The quote is to bring peshat, and to bring aggadah which works well and explains aspects of the text. Rashi to Bereishit 3:8: ואני לא באתי אלא לפשוטו של מקרא ולאגדה המיישבת דברי המקרא דבר דבור על אופניו I would estimate that about 80% of Rashi is citations of midrashim. In this instance, Rashi's ...


3

see the tur yoreh dea 141 for a larger discussion. Pedagogical purposes is not the only exception. For the rif admittedly it is the only exception but according to the rosh if it is of the public, rather than that of an individual, it is OK. Yissachar's banner was of the public. There is also a distinction between weaving and non-weaving, with weaving what ...


3

I can't give you all sources, but a brief summary of the Rambam: The Rambam discusses two types of derashos. In his Introduction to the Talmud, the Rambam discusses derashos in which the halacha is not in dispute, just the scriptural source is - the drasha is merely an attempt to identify the source, and the halacha preceded the source. An example is the ...


2

In Dynamics of Dispute, Rabbi Lampel points out that in areas of Aggada, we even find Amoraim breaking the Golden Rule and arguing with Tannaim - see for example Megillah 7a in which Shmuel claims he has a better source for the Divine nature of Megillas Ester: אמר שמואל אי הואי התם הוה אמינא מלתא דעדיפא מכולהו שנאמר קימו וקבלו קימו למעלה מה שקיבלו למטה ...


2

The sefer אוצר השמות חלק ב here says that according to the actions of this angel which are described in the gemara, his functiion is to do things which require strength to carry them out. For example: He struck to the ground the maidens of the daughter of Pharaoh because they wanted to stop her from saving Moshe. (Sotah 12b) He castrated Potiphar because ...


2

There are lots of examples of this in Sefer Kol-Bo (c. 14th century). One such example, brought in §122, concerns the halakha that a convert will only be accepted if s/he agrees to observe the entire Torah. This is learnt out from Psalm 146:7-9, as follows: ה' מתיר אסורים, ה' פוקח עורים, ה' זוקף כפופים, ה' אוהב צדיקים, ה' שומר את גרים: ראשי התיבות הללו ...


2

Many of the answers already given are excellent. So I will simply add some additional resources that you might find useful. First of all, there are the following two seforim on aggados that were not mentioned yet: R' Yakov of Lissa (author of the Nesivos HaMishpat) wrote a commentary on Aggados titled Emes L'Yakov. R' Yosef Shaul Nathansohn (author of the ...


2

You might be interested in the index and collection of commentaries on Agadot, found on the Mechon Halacha Berura's website. I didn't fully understand the relationship between the Halacha Berura Institute and this collection of commentaries on the Agadot, but either way, they collect explanations of Agadot that are scattered throughout, Rabinical Literature. ...


2

You would probably like this JLI class called Curious Tales of the Talmud: Finding Personal Meaning in the Legends of our Sages. See if you can find one in your area. Especially the book that comes with the class has many references to Aggadas, and by seeing which books are quoted you will probably find many leads.


2

Rabbeinu Bechaya (Bamidbar 28:15), mentioned in this answer (here's a more clear printing of the text), does say the the moon was literally diminished. He just says that the diminishment was not meant in size, but in output. The Talmud (Chulin 60A) says that the everything was created in the size it is now, so it can't mean that the moon was physically ...


2

There is a name for this. It is called an "asmachta" Due to some grammatical and theological issues, the statement by the Netziv is misleading as translated. When he writes: "“there is no tradition that is not hinted at in the biblical text” What he means is the following. For every oral tradition that was not based on the text of the Torah, there is a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible