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I've heard other answers, but the simplest one I've heard is in a book by R' Matisyahu Solomon -- the Torah describes the Messianic era as "vehetivcha vehirbecha me'avosecha" -- "G-d will then make things better for you than he ever did for your ancestors." So if I believe it will be better, naturally, I look forward to it.


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Of course how you answer this depends on how you view the purpose of the Ikkarim. Following the view that you attributed to the Chasam Sofer, Rabbi Yoel Kahn (in the series I referenced in the comments there, and summarized here (hat tip)) gives a simple metaphor. It would be like a soldier in a war not caring to win the war he is participating in. He can ...


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An excerpt from Fundamentals and Faith (based on teachings of R' Yaakov Weinberg, written by Rabbi Mordechai Blumenfeld): It would seem, then, that "awaiting him" should be understood as attributing to him so much importance that one is aware of missing something, of lacking something every moment of one's life. It is not enough to know and believe in ...


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perhaps by "eino mechake" the rambam does not mean simply "wait for" but rather that one does not "wait for him because he gave up hope of him ever coming" as the rambam continues שהרי תורה העידה עליו which implies he doesn't believe it will happen despite that the torah says so.


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I guess the simplest answer to this question is that anyone who truly understand what the Messianic Era is like, according to the Torah and prophets, could not possibly want to continue living in the diaspora. The only possible explanation for why someone would rather live without Mashiach is that he doesn't actually believe (or understand) what Mashiach is ...


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A source that we should pray for Moshiach's coming: Rambam Introduction to Perek Chelek, Yesod 12, Kappach translation: היסוד השנים עשר, ימות המשיח. והוא להאמין וּלְאַמֵּת שיבוא, ואין לומר שנתאחר, "אִם יִתְמַהְמָהּ חַכֵּה לוֹ" (חבקוק ב ג) ... ולהתפלל לבואו Translation of bold words - The twelfth principle is the days of the Messiah... and pray for his ...


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I think in many ways the question answers itself in the first sentence. "... if we identify with the Torah's way of life." Would anyone propose that that is optional? That according to the Torah it is OK to not identify with a Torah way of life? (We see its identification with a Torah way of life from the many statements in the Rambam about how the ...


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Here is an article about Armilus. One must remember that there is no mention of Armilus until Saadia Gaon. This brings some doubt as to whether or not Armilus actually exists or whether it is just Christian philisophical influence http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/1789-armilus


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The Moshiach is considered a King and the Halacha is as stated in the Rambam (Melachim 1:5) (From Hebrewbooks.org) Although this may not appear to directly answer your question of whether there are explicit references to a woman not being moshiach. However, the point is that a woman may not be crowned, so it is a halachic impossibility, and thus there ...


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No, Moshiach is a King, and woman cannot halachically be a king


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I am not even addressing the Rambam and the rules that only a man can take the throne. That goes without saying. Since part of the definition of Mashiach is that he will take the throne and his children will continue to hold it, the mashiach cannot be a woman. However, I address other logic as well below. Since the Mashiach will be a king and will have ...



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