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According to the Rambam, Moshiach will not last forever. I am not sure if you mean the individual or the time period, but both are temporary. In intro to Chelek, the Rambam writes that the King Moshiach will live a long life, and he will die and be succeeded by his progeny. The age of tranquility that Moshiach will usher in will last longer than Moshiach ...


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Everyone agrees that Olam Haba is the ultimate reward and will last forever. There is a difference of opinion what olam haba is. The Rambam says it's Gan Eden, which is spiritual. Moshiach will be temporary, and afterwards the physical world will cease and we'll have Gan Eden. The Ramban says that olam haba is Moshiach, and it will last forever in this ...


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Are we not supposed to believe that he could come everyday? So what`s the point of the whole discussion? No, we shouldn`t say he must come in this generation, rather he must come today.


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According to the Ramchal, the Mashiach won't last forever. The Mashiach will come sometime before the year 6000. The purpose of the moshiach is to get Am Yisrael back into the proper form (e.g. dwelling in Eretz Yisrael, according to their tribes and ancestral heritage, able to study torah free of interference from the nations). Then, in the year 6000, the ...


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The third Beish Hamikdash will be the last one and it will be eternal because Hashem will build himself. And when Moshiach comes the whole world will be Eretz Yisroel and now what is Ertez Yisroel will be Yerushalayim. Does this answer your question?


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To directly answer your question see סנהדרין צח: we find a list of some of our greatest talmudic heros saying this phrase. ייתי ולא איחמיניה. Artscroll translates 'may he come, but may I not see him'. This was in said due to their fears of the Messianic wars. On the subject of desiring his arrival, here is a list of places which might help clarify the words ...


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An analogy to the way you asked your question can be made to some of the meforshim on the meraglim. There are those that say that the meraglim did not want to have to give up living in the midbar, being protected by the ananei hakavod, eating the man, drinking the miraculous water, being able to learn constantly, and not having to deal with the "real world". ...


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The Maharal in Netzach Yisroel, in a passage explaining the symbolism of eiruv tavshilin, says that those who fulfilled the mitvot in olam hazeh/galus (this world/exile) continue to earn sechar (merit) in ymot hamoshiach (the messianic age). Not desiring ymot hamoshiach, in light of this idea, would then seem to be essentially a denial (emotionally, if not ...


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I remember discussing this at some length some years ago with a rabbi in Ner Israel (in Baltimore. I don't remember which rabbi it was). We were discussing not whether one is considered a "denier" for not wanting mashiach, which is more your question, but why one should want mashiach if it means the end of all our reward-accrual and growth in spiritual ...


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Update for revised question (original is below) R' Chaim Shmulevitz in the Derech L'Chaim commentary to Derech Hashem addresses this question. He asks, the Rambam writes that all the Nevi'im wanted Moshiach so that they could settle down and focus on learning Torah, but לפום צערא אגרא (the reward is commensurate to the struggle/effort), so why would they ...


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There are several. Some of them are brought here by the Lubavitcher Rebbe. Kabbalistically Kiddush Levana is said after Tisha B'Av because the afternoon is the time of the birth of Moshiach. Similarly, Rabbi Chaim Vital (the main student of the Arizal) says we can say Pesukei Nechama - verses of comfort, which are normally skipped on Tisha B'Av, at Mincha ...



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