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8

I think an answer can be inferred from the Aruch Hashulchan's detailed discussion in 673:9-12. He sources the Tur, who says explicitly that there are two non-mitzva lights in addition to the official Chanuka lights. One is a "helper light" called the shamash and the other is an "extra" one. The shamash is used to light the other light(s). In practice this ...


4

Rabbi Shlomo Kluger writes that a miracle which breaks the laws of nature (a revealed miracle) is greater than a miracle that takes place within the laws of nature (a hidden miracle). The miracle of Chanukah was of the first type, and therefore we publicize it greatly for all the world to see. But the miracle of Purim was clothed in the laws of nature, and ...


4

This very question is dealt with in chapter 43 of the second volume of אלה הם מועדי by Rabbi Eliyahu Schlesinger of Gilo, Jerusalem. He cites Shlomo Zalman Auerbach who holds that one does recite Al HaNisim in Mincha after lighting the Menorah. (See הליכות שלמה- מועדים,יז:ז) He explains that despite that it's still the 24th of Kislev; it's considered ...


4

I'm assuming you're concerned about misrepresenting the number of days of the holiday. Activate the bulb for that night, but use a timer to keep it off until the night starts. Then the timer will turn it on with the correct amount of lights.


3

You may find this answer interesting (from Rabbi Moshe Bogomilsky, paraphrazing a Sicha from the Lubavitcher Rebbe): Whenever a Jew is thankful about his physical survival, he does not have to communicate it to non-Jews, since physical self-survival is a common instinct among all humans and animals, and it is understood that Jews will fight for their ...


3

An answer to: Do they retain this status if they are seen outside of their halachic time, such as very late at night? See O Ch 674 (1) in the Remo who says אבל אחר שעבר זמן המצוה מותרים בהנאה - After the time of the mitzva it is permitted to have benefit from them.


3

Generally, the mitzva is ner ish uveiso -- lighting for your home. It appears that at some point an additional enactment was made to light in synagogues, and whoever's appointed by the synagogue lights there, with a bracha. (He then lights again at home, with a bracha.) Lighting in other places -- offices (I'm really not sure what to call that), public ...


2

My understanding the reason chanukah candles are not required to burn the entire night is tied to the difference between chanukah candles and shabbos candles. Shabbos candles are to provide light and one would expect them to burn a long time (the whole night), but chanukah candles are specifically not to provide light, but to remind us of the miracle that ...


1

The Admor Meostrovtze offers a fascinating explanation as to why Chazal decided that we should light Chanuka candles for specifically half an hour. Each Chanuka a person lights 36 candles in total (excluding the Shamoshim). If we light each candle for half an hour, there is a total of 18 hours of Chanuka candles burning each year. Since a person’s lifespan ...


1

Rabbi Yerachmiel Zeltzer compiled (and commented upon) some 100 answers is his נר למאה sometime in the 60's. It has recently been republished and is available online here. More recently, another volume, ימי שמונה has been published that contains 500 (!) answers and is available online here. Both volumes are still in print and are available for purchase from ...


1

I used the Super Wicks this year, but found that some burned with very little output of light. They would stay lit long after the ones that worked as expected since they were consuming oil at a much slower pace.



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