Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

You may discard it. The gemara (Megillah 26b) states: תנו רבנן: תשמישי מצוה - נזרקין, תשמישי קדושה - נגנזין. ואלו הן תשמישי מצוה: סוכה, לולב, שופר, ציצית. ואלו הן תשמישי קדושה: דלוסקמי ספרים, תפילין ומזוזות, ותיק של ספר תורה, ונרתיק של תפילין ורצועותיהן Our Rabbis taught: ‘Accessories of religious observances [when disused] are to be thrown away; ...


14

Mishna B'rura to 21:1 says that once a thing used for a mitzva is no longer usable for the mitzva, it can be discarded, but should not be discarded in a degrading manner or used for a degrading purpose. He considers deliberately throwing it onto the garbage heap as an example of discarding it in a degrading manner. [I've heard recommended that such an object ...


9

The Aruch Hashulchan in Orach Chaim 671:2 notes this difficulty and explains that for mitzvos involving publicizing of a miracle (פרסומי ניסא), including Chanukah candles and the four cups of wine on Pesach (Orach Chaim 472:13), one must spend all of his money. Of course this just brings up another question: why should פרסומי ניסא cases be so strict?


9

One of the purposes of the shamash is to ensure that there is light in the vicinity of the menora other than that of the menora itself. That way, if someone reads near the menora, their reading won't be [exclusively] by the light of the menora's lights, so they won't be making mundane use of those lights, which is forbidden, since they're supposed to serve ...


9

Based on my answer here, I think you can clean it in the bathroom because it has no inherent holiness.


8

The Shulchan Aruch in Orach Chayim 676:1 says that you should recite it on the second night after the regular two b'rachos. The same goes for any subsequent night if it is the first time you are lighting this year. But there are two exceptions to this rule: The first is if he knew on the first night that he was not going to light his own candles, and he ...


8

The source for this recitation is Tractate Soferim (20:4). Aramaic was a major lingustic influence on halachic literature in Babylonia during the Geonic period when that tractate was composed, and in Aramaic the plural form ends with a nun rather than a mem.


8

I think an answer can be inferred from the Aruch Hashulchan's detailed discussion in 673:9-12. He sources the Tur, who says explicitly that there are two non-mitzva lights in addition to the official Chanuka lights. One is a "helper light" called the shamash and the other is an "extra" one. The shamash is used to light the other light(s). In practice this ...


7

http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=50452&st=&pgnum=57 See note 132. Per Rabbeinu Yitzchok the son of the Raavad and the Chesed L'Avraham there are 15 types of Chanuka Menorahs and the order of preference is as follows. Gold Silver Copper metal in the color of gold or other metal with such a color Actual copper which is reddish Metal which is ...


7

Josephus (Ant. XII:7:7) mentions that "from that time to this we celebrate this festival, and call it Lights." So this association between Chanukah and lights existed already in his times. In the Gemara, Shabbos 21b, we also find the schools of Hillel and Shammai - who were active from c. 30 BCE to c. 10 CE - debating the proper procedure when lighting more ...


7

Although it does not list a source - Luach Davar Be'ito says (29 Kislev 5755): המדקדקים מכינים כבר עתה את פתילות נרות החנוכה שלמחרת ליל מוצש׳׳ק, למען ימצאון מוכנות בבואם מחר מביהכ׳׳נ ויהיו זריזים מקדימים.‏ Those that are careful prepare before Shabbos the Chanuka candles in order to light as soon as possible after Shabbos. (abridged ...


6

This is a famous question asked by the Bait Yosef (OC 670), which has gained so much popularity since he's asked it, seemingly because of it's simplistic ingenuity, that it's attracted hundreds of answers from most everyone who has ever had anything to say about Chanuka. The Bait Yosef himself gives three possible answers: (quoted from here) Those ...


6

A fire is a fire is a fire - See OH 673(1) ואע"פ שאין השמנים נמשכים אחר הפתילה ואין האור נתלה יפה באותם הפתילות Even though the wicks don't absorb the oil well and the light [fire] doesn't attach well to those wicks (--translation mine) (i.e. even if your lights are poor, your still yotzeh the mitzvah). That being said, the מצוה מן המבחר is to ...


6

Per Rabbi Ben Zion Abba Shaul in an essay in Ohr Olam one in prison should light and make a Bracha on Chanuka candles. See the conclusion of the essay here. See also Sichos in English It is of particular importance to reach those Jews who are confined to hospitals and prisons, and to help them to light Chanukah candles.


5

Put water and dishwashing detergent in a basin; let the entire menora soak in it.


5

First of all, note that opinions brought in Avnei Nezer 2:500 that you need to have the candles lit in some sort of kli (vessel) and not just loose. According to these opinions, the menora itself is a mitzva object. That said, even if you don't rule that way we have a notion of hiddur mitzva even for things that aren't direct mitzva objects such as the ...


5

Vedibarta Bam brings two answers: From the Tzemach Dovid of Dinov: The Gemora writes that the oil was מונח בחותמו של כהן גדול - "lying with the Kohen Gadol's seal". It should have said, "שהי' חתום" - "that was sealed?" From this we may deduce that when the Hasmoneans entered the Beit Hamikdash, their eyes beheld a fascinating phenomenon. They saw one cruse ...


4

Despite the fact that everyone seems to assume you light from left to right (don't take my word for it; try a simple Google search!) there actually is a difference of opinion. The following information is taken directly from Halachipedia (with some very minor editing by me for formatting purposes): Maharik (Responsa 183, cited by Beit Yosef 676:5) ...


4

I used to use a product similar to (or the same as) the one recommended by Sam. I think I once had an incident where the metal base got hot enough to damage the cup, so now, I always put water at the bottom of the cup, before I put in the oil. Anyway, the cups hold much more than enough oil to be lit for the requisite duration. More recently, I've been ...


4

20th c. rabbi and legal decisor Yisrael Meir Kagan wrote in the Mishna B'rura (Orach Chayim 676) that the guiding principle in lighting the candles is never to pass one's hand past a candle without lighting it since that would constitute passing up an opportunity to perform a mitzva. So, assuming a right-handed person standing slightly to the left of and ...


4

Because it teaches us that even "nature" is a miracle.


4

Rav Aharon Lichtenstein has a broad analysis of this subject. He dealt with the issue personally when his father went blind late in life. Part I - http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak66/14halak.htm Part II - http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak66/15halak.htm Part III - http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak66/16halak.htm


4

He is chayav (obligated). Therefore if someone else lives in the same home, we have him fulfill his obligation with him by paying him a small amount to partner with him. If he has a wife, she lights for both of them. If not, then he lights with someone helping him (so that he does not hurt himself or start a fire.) SA OC 675: 3 MA 4 סומא אם יכול להשתתף ...


4

Many explain that because there was a time when it was dangerous to light outside the requirement was rescinded and was not re instituted since. The Aruch Hashulchan (671:24) explains that in the countries Jews lived in then the climate did not permit for lighting outside unless they would close the Menorah in a glass box which is an extra burden the Sages ...


4

I once heard from the previous Pittsburger Rebbe ztsl a beautiful answer on this question. He asked what was done with the jug after it was emptied into the menorah? Since oil sticks, there must have been drops of oil left inside and they were Kodoish. It must be that they returned it to the Beis HaBad (the place where they pressed the oil) to have it ...


4

It was well know in the 1980's in our Yeshiva - Kol Torah - that the Rosh Yeshiva - HoRav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach זצ"ל used to light his Menora at his front door and a single candle at the window facing Rehov Usishkin.


4

This very question is dealt with in chapter 43 of the second volume of אלה הם מועדי by Rabbi Eliyahu Schlesinger of Gilo, Jerusalem. He cites Shlomo Zalman Auerbach who holds that one does recite Al HaNisim in Mincha after lighting the Menorah. (See הליכות שלמה- מועדים,יז:ז) He explains that despite that it's still the 24th of Kislev; it's considered ...


4

Rabbi Shlomo Kluger writes that a miracle which breaks the laws of nature (a revealed miracle) is greater than a miracle that takes place within the laws of nature (a hidden miracle). The miracle of Chanukah was of the first type, and therefore we publicize it greatly for all the world to see. But the miracle of Purim was clothed in the laws of nature, and ...


4

I'm assuming you're concerned about misrepresenting the number of days of the holiday. Activate the bulb for that night, but use a timer to keep it off until the night starts. Then the timer will turn it on with the correct amount of lights.


3

Here is something I wrote about this last year: One of the most famous questions asked about חנוכה is known as “The Beis Yosef’s Question”. The גמרא explains the reason for the celebration of חנוכה is because the Jews found only one flask of oil containing enough oil to light the מנורה for just one day. A miracle occurred and the oil lasted for eight days. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible