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That verse is specifically referring to someone who wants to eat Truma or Kodshim. Someone who has no intention of eating either of these has no biblical need to do Tevila. See Talmud Bava Kama 82b concerning Ezra's enactment that any man who had a seminal immission should do Tevila. The Talmud asks 'this is a biblical command! (meaning how can we claim ...


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Jewish men have worn a plethora of hat wear, but the popularity of the fedora seems to have stemmed from the last Chabad Lubavitch Rebbe, R. Menachem Schneerson. R. Schneerson's adoption of this hat, which would influence the hat wearing of fellow Chabad members, is historically marked to his ascent in becoming the seventh Lubavitcher Rebbe, after the death ...


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The Responsa Tiferes Tzvi, Yoreh De'ah Vol. 2 #27 writes that according to the Rambam, Tosefos, and the Rosh, a man who has an emission (ba'al keri) does not become completely tahor through immersion in a mikvah so long as he has a more serious tumah, the impurity of contact with a corpse, which all of us have today and are unable to remove. For this reason ...


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A man who had a seminal emission is called a baal keri. At the time of the Beth Hamikdash he had to immerse in a mikve and would become tahor again on the evening following his immersion. Today he remains tamei and there is no commandment to immerse (see e.g., artscroll's commentary on Vayikra 15:19). The reason that some in Hassidic communities (e.g., ...


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In Tora Thanks to DoubleAA, I understand a little better the OP. Baal keri status originally concern uncleanness and cleanness laws and not prayer or learning Torah; see Mishna Kelim 1, 1 (semen makes unclean the person that touches it and the person from witch it originates). The verses cited above in the OP are part of those laws. A large number of ...



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