Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

First, as @Yirmeyahu commented above, there is no death penalty for "all sex outside marriage". There is a verse which states לֹא תִהְיֶה קְדֵשָׁה מִבְּנוֹת יִשְׂרָאֵל וְלֹא יִהְיֶה קָדֵשׁ מִבְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל, but that does not specify a death penalty of stoning. The prostitutes profession was irrelevant to the case. And it would not be a good society if ...


7

Asked and answered here. it seems quite likely that this is a later interpolation; it doesn't appear in early prints of Rashi. In several places, though, Rashi refers to לשון כנען, which was a popular term at the time for the Slavic languages (based on the equation of "Slav" with "slave" and the association of the latter with Canaan). These ...


5

The Kli Yakar there asks this question on the Midrash, and explains that although the bull understood from the very beginning that his going to the Ba'al would result in a sanctification of Hashem's name - it was nonetheless hesitant to go, as it was worried that by going over to the side of impurity it would become negatively affected. The bull therefore ...


5

Taanis 22b relates that Yoshiyahu said "צדיק הוא ה׳ כי פיהו מריתי" - HaShem is righteous for I have rebelled against his word. (quote from Eicha 1:18)


4

Bavli Sotah 46b-47a describes this incident in more detail. R. Yochanan said in the name of Meir that whoever does not escort others or allow himself to be escorted, it as if he shed blood, for if the men of Jericho had escorted Elisha, he would not have stirred up the bears. The g'mara then goes on to explain the incident. First, who are the "little ...


4

I think you are referring to the (re)discovery of the Torah scroll by Chilkiyahu the High Priest in the time of Yoshiyahu (Josiah?) (mentioned in Kings II chap. 22, and Chronicles II chap. 34), in the course of renovations to the Temple. (If I'm mistaken, please cite a source). You are quite correct that there were many copies of the Torah. This particular ...


4

The ArtScroll edition of Chronicles (I and II), by Rabbi Moshe Eisenman, focuses on the idea that Kings is about what actually happened, while Chronicles is about the deeper meaning. That's why Chronicles often uses many names for one person, referring to his essence, not his real name. Also, Chronicles ends by explicitly stating that the exile was because ...


4

Absolutely nothing! The reason the three pesukim are added at the beginning is so that we don't have to add at the end. To explain, consider Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 284: מפטירין בנביא מענינה של פרשה ואין פוחתין מכ"א פסוקים אלא אם כן סליק ענינא בבציר מהכי כגון עולותיכם ספו על זבחיכם. "We read the Haftarah from the Navi from the subject matter of ...


4

Malbim on this wording (verse 2) explains that Elijah did not want to enter Beth-el, because one of Jeroboam's calf statues was there (Kings I 12:28-29).


3

Rashi, Metzudas David, and Radak say that he announced to people on the way what he was going to do and he did not believe it would work therefore it did not work. Yalkut Meam Loez says, Gehazi tested out the staff on the way on either a dead lion or a dead dog, which it revived, and thus it lost its power to do so for the lad.


3

This article from the OU's magazine “Jewish Action” says that there are jokes in the Talmud, “It is related that Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan was once asked if there are any jokes in the Talmud, and his response was, “yes, but they’re all old.” Jokes with a “Hechsher” A cursory reading of the Talmud’s text validates that assertion. An informed reading may ...


3

Kings was edited by Jeremiah, the prophet serving during the time of the destruction of the first Temple, to frame things in a way that the people could see how they'd made the downward slide over the past few centuries, and how recently they'd just been circling the drain. The people had thought the Temple would always be around -- and then they needed to ...


3

The Alshich here explains that on the day that a Tzaddik (a righteous person) dies, he receives from G-d an additional level of holiness. Also, even though Elijah was leaving behind his protégé Elisha, nevertheless, prophecy would certainly be lessened by his parting. This was especially true since Jezebel had recently killed many prophets. Therefore, G-d ...


3

The following is my understanding based on things I've read, but I can't give any sources at present. On a physical level, a doorway or a gateway is the dividing line between one domain and another. If there is a door, opening it allows people or things to go from one domain to the other, and closing it effects the opposite. (And bolting the door adds ...


2

The Midrash (Bamidbar Rabbah 7:5) lists 11 causes for Tzaraat and brings proof for each one of them. On of the causes listed is Haughtiness, and Naaman is used as a proof. The verse says, "וְנַעֲמָן שַׂר צְבָא מֶלֶךְ אֲרָם הָיָה אִישׁ גָּדוֹל", and the Midrash defines "Gadol" as being haughty, since he was a great warrior. This article says that Naaman's ...


2

I think that the point is being missed here. There are not that many places where there is a difference between the written word (k'siv) and the way the word is pronounced (kri). This is especially true where the written word would be pronounced the same way. The reason is generally that neither is quite correct. The "real" word should be some combination. ...


2

I think you have to put this in context. We're talking about an age where long distance communication was almost non-existent. So while the King had absolute influence over Jerusalem - the further you traveled the less influence he had. So while it's possible that within walking distance of Jerusalem the Torah had all but been forgotten (and this is ...


1

I think maybe only some of the commandments and the details of Torah (especially the punishment for idolatry and what really constitutes idolatry) was forgotten in the absence of the text. However the greater part of the how to do a lot of stuff (as what was a Shabbat violation or the niddah rules) were not forgotten, because it was more cultural than ...


1

R. Elishevitz (a very great Talmid Chacham from Russia who later moved to Israel about 80 years ago) in his sefer אלף המגן writes: A similar question can be asked on the parsha itself which starts with the laws of a woman who gives birth. What relevance does this have to the main subject of the parsha? We can answer these questions with a parable ...


1

Rav Eliyahu Essas, one of the most respected Russian rabbanim, answers this question on the verse Melachim I 6:7 here (in Russian though). The basic sense is that it is a typo. If one replaces the samech in rusi with mem, and they are very similar in print, one gets rumi or romi - translation to Latin, and indeed the word dolatum means to shape stones and ...


1

According to scholarly research, the Book of Chronicles is either based on the Book of Kings, or both works are based on earlier books, which have since been lost. (The book itself names its sources in many places.) It is likely that the book is based on some combination of the above, in addition to commentary (midrash) on the Book of Kings. I highly ...


1

What makes you think that he wasn't defeated? Admittedly he and some of his nation continued to exist, but in pasukim 24 & 25 it says clearly that the Israelites smote the Moabites. Chazal tell us why Mesha slaughtered his crown prince. Mesha had asked his advisers why the G'd of the Jews always helps them. His advisers told him that it came as a result ...


1

The Targum to Esther 2:5 says that Mordechai was descended from Shimei ben Geira, as was Esther, and that David's attitude toward Shimei initially was due to his prophetic knowledge of the two saviors of Israel that were to come from him. Once David saw that Shimei had stopped having children, he knew that Mordechai and Esther were accounted for, so he had ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible