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9

As noted in the comments, using electricity is melacha and thus forbidden on Shabbat. See this question for more information about why electricity is prohibited. Since, so far, it is not possible to ask and answer questions on Mi Yodeya without using electricity, the Shabbat-observant participants here do not engage in those activities on Shabbat. (Or Yom ...


6

Rambam, Shabas 1:3, says: Someone who does so on purpose, we hit him with a smiting for rebellion (makas mardus). That is, bes din does.


6

Aruch Hashulchan 496:5 says that it is forbidden for a Ben Eretz Yisrael to eat Chometz in Chutz L'Aretz on Acharon Shel Pesach. ויש מי שאומר דבן ארץ ישראל הבא לחוץ לארץ – אסור לו לאכול חמץ באחרון של פסח בכל עניין, אפילו דעתו לחזור. ונכון הוא, דזה גריע ממלאכה.‏


4

Opening an umbrella on Shabbat is generally considered to be forbidden because of building. The linked article notes that while the g'mara (not specifically cited) does permit opening a folding chair, even though that creates a "tent" over the ground below, the purpose of opening the chair isn't to create the tent, while the purpose of erecting a structure ...


4

I think I understand your question to be leaning more towards philosophy, however the question works in a broader sense as well, so I'll answer the basic question as worded in the heading, "Why are Melochos based on the construction of the Mishkan?" The simplest answer to this question is that the Mishkan needed to be constructed almost entirely from ...


3

I will answer the question in a general manner. Any business open on Shabbat has to deal with three issues: One may not desecrate Shabbat, and one may not instruct a non-Jew to do for him something which is prohibited to do on Shabbat. In this regard, if one can operate a hotel without desecrating Shabbat, then this is not a problem. However, if there are ...


2

When I teach the 39 Melochos to teenagers I give the following introduction. The definition of what is allowed or not allowed to do on Shabbos is not defined by what we call work. For example, if your mother asks you to wash the dishes would you consider that 'work'? (I typically get a loud 'yes'); Yet it is permissie to wash dishes on Shabbos! Now, if I put ...


2

The short answer is that, due to the juxtaposition of the command to build the Mishkan (tabernacle) to the prohibition of violating the Sabbath, we derive that any activity associated with creating the Mishkan is prohibited on the Sabbath. Here is a short summary.


2

I would like to build off of SethJ's answer. The idea is not that the milachas are based on the construction of the Mishkan. Rather, the construction of the mishkan is how we know what the milachas are. What is forbidden on Shabbat is constructive labor (independent of anything having to do with the Mishkan). Now, to answer your question about the golden ...


2

By turning on the light at his request, you would be causing him to violate the commandment of "lifnei 'iver -- placing a stumbling block before the blind." The Rabbis interpret this to forbid one Jew to cause another to sin. See MT Laws of Murder 12:14 for source.


2

Some say yes, some say no. The issue is not only wringing, but also whether the paste turning into froth is considered nolad, something new that came to be on Shabbat. For a comprehensive overview of the issues involved and which poskim have ruled what, see Yabia Omer Vol. IV O"H #30, where Rav Ovadia rules that it is permissible to brush your teeth using ...


2

The גמרא is referring to an אוהל עראי - a temporary tent - in all the cases on that page, IIRC. The logic goes, that once you have a Tefach, you have an אוהל עראי -and now you are simply enlarging it. The Noda BiYehuda and others discuss it; seems like enlarging a tent is D'Rabonon and so is making an אוהל עראי - and 2 D'Rabonons are allowed.


2

As mentioned in the comments פסיק רישא דלא ניחא ליה is probably equivalent to פסיק רישא דלא איכפת ליה. The Big Question is regular פסיק רישא vs. מלאכה שאינה צריכה לגופה Background There is double machlokes that comes up between R.Shimon and R. Yehuda. R.Shimon holds "דבר שאינו מתכוון is muttar (Beitza 2:10), while R.Yehuda holds its assur. R. Shimon holds ...


2

You could try to construe something odd and theoretical in which the question would come up [e.g. you have a commercial bakery in the middle of nowhere], but practically in the case you describe -- you could build a 20-foot brick wall surrounding your pizza store, but it's in a Jewish neighborhood (as kosher restaurants are), so there will be the smells, ...


1

Beis din could inflict makus mardus. That could in fact be more than the 39 lashes he gets for a biblical prohibition when the punishment isn't death (such as eating treifa or shaving with a razor). And according to the Gemara he gets מיתה בידי שמים (death by God's hand, not beis din's) if he violates rabbinic prohibitions to show, lhachus (deliberately), ...


1

The Baal HaTanya, in his Piskei HaSiddur, Hilcheta Rabbata L'Shabbata, rules that one should remove a fly from cup of wine by spilling out the wine until the fly leaves the cup. Since he is holding the cup of wine, and want the wine and not the cup, this is considered manually separating Food from Waste, which is permitted on Shabbat, if one wants to ...


1

I once heard a tape by Rabbi Uziel Milvsky of ohr somayach entitle "the Sabbath". There he brings down that there is holiness in space (temple) and there is holiness in time (shabbat). The Sabbath is the temple in time. This is why there is so much parallels between the two. He didn't get into it much more than that, because it is probably heavily mystical ...


1

See Rabbi Torczyner's lecture on attending conferences. If I understood and recall his lecture correctly, generally speaking, where necessary it would be permissible, assuming that the speaker would be using the same electronic devices regardless of your presence. (Rabbi Torczyner always starts with "ask your local synagogue rabbi for actual psak", of ...


1

The English word "work" is a poor translation -- what is forbidden is a category of behavior which is called, in Hebrew, melacha. There are many attempts to translate it directly, beyond "work" including "creative actions" but none gets to the heart of the concept. There are particular categories and sub categories which define what the specific behaviors ...



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