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7

The short answer is that this is allowed. There are two issues here Is work forbidden before havdala? Can you benefit from work done by a Jew after shabbat if he hasn't done havdala? The answer to the first question is that indeed work is forbidden before havdala (see Mishna Brura 299:10), the Rema says one might be lenient for non full-fledged labor ...


5

Journal of Halacha & Contemporary Society, No. XXI - Spring 91 - Pesach 5751 has an article by Rabbi Michael Broyde - Adjunct Assistant Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School, and Rabbi Howard Jachter - Associate Rabbi of Congregation Beth Judah in Brooklyn which gives Rabbi Auerbach's opinion in his own words. The article concludes that current ...


5

Rav David Sperling, in an article on the Nishmat website, writes as follows: ...the Eshel Avraham (Buchatch, 539) states that one need not employ any tactics, even simple ones, to avoid having to perform work that is a davar ha'aved on the festival. Accordingly one would not have to use their vacation option to avoid working on the festival. It ...


5

Google is your friend! The COR, Chabad, the OU, and the Star-K say you can light a burner from a pilot light on yom tov.


4

Um, yes. Depending on the type of illness involved, it is certainly pikuach nefesh. (Usually, something that is identified on a Medic Alert bracelet is something serious) Your argument that he is "[currently] in good health" is invalid -- if there is a concern (even sfek sfeika) that his life will be endangered later, one may violate Shabbos for that. For ...


4

On Yom Kippur, there is a special rule concerning meal preparation. But apart from this all is identical to Shabbat. Megila mishna 1, 5: אֵין בֵּין שַׁבָּת לְיוֹם הַכִּפּוּרִים אֶלָּא שֶׁזֶּה זְדוֹנוֹ בִּידֵי אָדָם וְזֶה זְדוֹנוֹ בְּכָרֵת : ‏ There is no difference between sabbath and the day of atonement save only that the deliberate violation of ...


3

Without commenting on the specific situation, shabbat's rest is an absolute obligation which doesn't depend on what one does during the week. Whether one worked or rested during the work, one needs to abstain from creative work (melacha) on shabbat. Shabbat is not observed because it is a reward but because God commanded so, as a memory for the creation of ...


3

It is a mitzvah to violate Shabbat to save a person's life (see e.g. SA OC 328:2). When doing so, the minimum possible Shabbat violation should be done (SA OC 328:16 and the Mishna Berura there). So if continuing to drive on Shabbat is the only way to save the person's life, then it should be done. It should be noted that driving (a gasoline-powered car) ...


3

To put it quick: There are 3 issurim which come into play with someone doing Melocha for you: Amira - speaking, or instructing to do melocha; Benefeting - deriving from melocha which was done for you; Shliach - that is having melocha done for you (even if you don't benefit, or instructed anyone). So in order to avoid transgression one has to make sure ...


3

Most of his rulings are according to his Rebbe Rabbi Schacther


3

Rabbi Sh'lomo Zalman Auerbach is cited in Sh'miras Shabas K'hilchasah (1979 edition, chapter 11 footnote 6) as saying that cut tomatoes are not included in the category of "foods commonly preserved by salting" nowadays [meaning: in his days] and therefore can be salted (for use the same day). RSZA adds, SSK says, that he would say the same about radishes, ...


2

The Rivevos Ephraim Chelek 8:564:1 was asked if one can blow bubbles from chewing gum(bazuka). He writes that making bubbles from soap was discussed in Shmiras Shabbas Kehilchasa perek 17:30 and says that one shouldn't make them. However, he writes that one shouldn't refrain a child from doing so,and the reason written in the name of Rav Shlomo Zalamn ...


2

Zadon Shabbos, knowing that it's Shabbos, does not mean that he knows every aspect of Shabbos. It means he knows that it's Shabbos. As Rashi heichi mashkachas lah says, that he knows it's Shabbos. The only thing is that too know it's Shabbos, you need to know at least one biblical law, or else in what way do you know it's Shabbos? We see later in the gemara, ...


2

So you're asking a very broad question here. The short answer to your question is that there is a melacha of Tearing (קורע) besides for the issue of the perforations (מחתך). First is the issue of Tearing, on which there are different opinions. To quote myself in another answer: The Shulchan Aruch HaRav (340:17) (and I believe, the Minchas Chinuch) holds ...


2

The Shulchan Aruch 339:7 implies that one is only allowed to enter a docked boat if he is not moving it around: סְפִינָה, אִם הִיא יוֹשֶׁבֶת בְּקַרְקַע הַיָּם וְאֵינָהּ שָׁטָה כְּלָל, מֻתָּר לִכָּנֵס בָּהּ; וְאִם הִיא קְשׁוּרָה כְּמִנְהַג הַסְפִינוֹת הָעוֹמְדוֹת בַּנָּמֵל, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁהִיא שָׁטָה עַל פְּנֵי הַמַּיִם, מֻתָּר לִכָּנֵס בָּהּ. One ...


2

He should not risk his life. Instead, he should violate Shabbat in order to stay safe. The first thing a person should do when they see that Shabbat is approaching and they are likely to get stuck, is get on the phone with a Rabbi, ideally one several time zones over. (Always good to have a Californian Rabbi in your phone). He should seek to minimize ...


2

Shulchan aruch harav 340.6 below (See footnotes there for original sources). Brings that it is permitted to write in the are or on the table without ink becouse it does not leave any mark at all I guess making letters with your hands is similar and is permitted since it is not even remotely similar to writing and it was not decreed upon. I guess the ...


2

Extracted from this M.Y. answer: Can I ask a person to open it for me? Even someone who does not open cans on Shabbos may use a can that was opened on Shabbos even if they were opened for him (Iggres Moshe: O"C Chelek Daled Siman Kuf Yud Tes Ois Heh) and does not require the person who opened it to drink from it. Non the less he may not ask ...


2

The "work" forbidden on Shabbat does not mean hard, physical work or employment. It is "melacha" = creative work. There are 39 main categories of melacha http://halachipedia.com/index.php?title=Index_of_Laws_of_Shabbat_by_the_39_Melachot So, even if Shabbat would be a "reward" for working the other 6 days (and there is no mention of this - every Jew is ...


2

It would be at least לא תעמוד על דם רעך. And I would imagine much worse.


1

The Rambam says in Hilchos Shabbas 9,6 that smelting metal is bishul, which does not answer your question. It would seem that activities that could only be performed by the king or large organisations, such as quarrying, are not included in the 39 melachos which relate to the average individual's cessation from work. Alternatively these activities may not ...


1

Rabbi Sorotzkin says that since this command was given to the entire community of Bnai Yisrael, it is not only each individual that must not do work, but that the community should ensure that no work is done in violation of Shabbos and that all needed work has been completed during the six days of the week. Chabad.org says that a person only deserves to ...


1

The Shulchan Aruch - Orach Chaim - סימן שמה - דין ארבע רשיות בשבת - teaches us that an area with a roof cannot be a Reshut Harabim . ...ז: אֵיזֶה רְשׁוּת הָרַבִּים, רְחוֹבוֹת וּשְׁוָקִים הָרְחָבִים ט''ז אַמָּה וְאֵינָם מְקֹרִים‏ So the people walking underground are not in the Reshut Harabim and cannot be counted towards the 600K.


1

I posted your question, yesterday, on dinonline. This is their answer: There are a number of potential problems: Cooking: it must be verified if the cheese was actually fully cooked in the production process. If not, bringing it to a temperature of Yad Soledes [about 110F] will violate the melacha of cooking. Chazara: Even if there is no ...


1

In terms of deriving benefit from the actions done by a Jew on Shabbat the Shulchan Aruch (OC 318:1 and Mishna Berurah and Biur Halacha there) distinguish between a number of cases: If a biblical prohibition was violated purposefully (deoraita bemeizid) then no one can derive benefit from it for the rest of shabbat, and the violator himself cannot derive ...


1

I once asked about this to Rabbi Dovid Feinstein. He said the product as is would not be permissable to wear in an area which has no eruv. His said since it provides no protection from outside elements it cannot be considered a malbush, clothing. He continued and said if the rubber sole would be solid and come up and cover at least past where the sole of ...


1

I can see that just the 3rd verse would seem confusing, and I was puzzled by this one, as well. All work (that is, the 39 categories of melacha assigned for Shabbat) are prohibited except for melacha that is necessary for food consumption such as cooking, baking, slaughtering, etc. (I won't delve, here, into the "extension" of the rule such as carrying ...


1

It is a tolada (corollary) of gozez (shearing). See, e.g., DailyHalacha.com: The Gemara addresses the related issue of cuticles – pieces of skin around the nail that become detached. The rule established in this regard is that if the piece of skin is mostly detached, and it is “facing upward,” then one may remove it on Shabbat. The Rishonim (Medieval ...


1

Shemirat Shabbath Kehilchata 35 (32) forbids removing warts or dry skin. Small pieces of skin which are still connected cannot be removed either.


1

One may do so, provided it's tied to something on the shore. [Obviously, he won't get very far.] Shulchan Aruch 339:7. However, see the commentaries there for details and exceptions. And, if this is a practical question for you, ask your rabbi rather than relying on what you read on this site. Note that there's no explicit prohibition on "traveling", though ...



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