Hot answers tagged

7

The short answer is that this is allowed. There are two issues here Is work forbidden before havdala? Can you benefit from work done by a Jew after shabbat if he hasn't done havdala? The answer to the first question is that indeed work is forbidden before havdala (see Mishna Brura 299:10), the Rema says one might be lenient for non full-fledged labor ...


5

Rav David Sperling, in an article on the Nishmat website, writes as follows: ...the Eshel Avraham (Buchatch, 539) states that one need not employ any tactics, even simple ones, to avoid having to perform work that is a davar ha'aved on the festival. Accordingly one would not have to use their vacation option to avoid working on the festival. It ...


5

Thank you Fred for sourcing it. The majority opinion in the Talmud is that a warning "this carries the death penalty" is sufficient, without specifying what method of execution. As Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan's Living Torah puts it: Since it was not specified what must be done to him, they placed him under guard. The death penalty was specified (Exodus ...


5

Journal of Halacha & Contemporary Society, No. XXI - Spring 91 - Pesach 5751 has an article by Rabbi Michael Broyde - Adjunct Assistant Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School, and Rabbi Howard Jachter - Associate Rabbi of Congregation Beth Judah in Brooklyn which gives Rabbi Auerbach's opinion in his own words. The article concludes that current ...


4

Um, yes. Depending on the type of illness involved, it is certainly pikuach nefesh. (Usually, something that is identified on a Medic Alert bracelet is something serious) Your argument that he is "[currently] in good health" is invalid -- if there is a concern (even sfek sfeika) that his life will be endangered later, one may violate Shabbos for that. For ...


3

To put it quick: There are 3 issurim which come into play with someone doing Melocha for you: Amira - speaking, or instructing to do melocha; Benefeting - deriving from melocha which was done for you; Shliach - that is having melocha done for you (even if you don't benefit, or instructed anyone). So in order to avoid transgression one has to make sure ...


3

The gemara (Shabbos 47a) explicitly permits reassembling tools that are easily and intentionally taken apart and reassembled as part of their normal use (such as fold-out beds; see also Rambam Hilchos Shabbos 22:26). Also, even a kli shemlachto l'issur (utensil devoted to purposes forbidden on Sabbath) such as a screwdriver, is allowed to be used l'tzorech ...


3

Sechita is a term that derives from the labor category of dash, threshing. The technical definition is "removing a product from its natural container." This therefore includes: Removing a wheat kernel from its husk Squeezing grapes for juice Milking a cow And somewhat differently, Wringing out a wet rag. Apparently water absorbed into a porous material ...


3

Dose of Halacha bring sources that allow it and those that forbid it based on different reason than mentioned above: Whether printing from a computer is considered ma'aseh hedyot or ma'aseh uman is the source of much debate. The dilemma is that while certainly nowadays typing requires less skill than writing (see Chol Hamoed Kehilchaso 6:89), nonetheless ...


3

One way to understand this is that the restrictions are Rabbinic (Tosfos, Maggid Mishna to the Rambam Shvisas Yom Tov 7:1 and others), and they built-in this exception. Rabbinic decrees often have such trap doors in order to ensure that they are manageable by the people. Another is that while the prohibition is Biblical (Rashi and many more), the exact ...


3

If the Talis would be a very thick material which does not flop over when held up, it would be Ohel. This is the way the Taz (and similarly the Magen Avraham) explain the opinion of the rishonim brought in siman 301 siff 40. They are subsequently brought in later achronim like Mishna Berurah 151. The Taz 27 specifically mentions Atifa, and the Magen ...


3

It is a mitzvah to violate Shabbat to save a person's life (see e.g. SA OC 328:2). When doing so, the minimum possible Shabbat violation should be done (SA OC 328:16 and the Mishna Berura there). So if continuing to drive on Shabbat is the only way to save the person's life, then it should be done. It should be noted that driving (a gasoline-powered car) ...


2

The answer to Can one run a surveillance Camera on Shabbos? quotes Dose of Halacha as saying, with regards to a surveillance camera: R’ Moshe Feinstein (in a letter to R’ Yisroel Rozen of the Tzomet Institute) wrote that as the data is not being permanently recorded, it is at worst a derabanan. Although the cameras operate for security purposes, the ...


2

By placing cold soup on a Blecht during Shabbat, we do NOT re-cook it, because this is NOT Bishul. The soup is merely re-heated below a temp. of Yad Soledet, about 45 deg. Celsius. This is why Rambam and others permit it, and this is my family's custom.


2

I don't think there is any problem with doing this. You are not creating the image, you are just allowing it to be seen by removing something which prevented you from seeing it. There is a discussion regarding a form of invisible ink that by putting it next to the flame it can be seen, which according to the Pri Megadim is rabbinically prohibited. But there ...


2

Yes, the Issur involves any "Behema", including horses. See the Shulchan Aruch siman 246, a horse is explicitly mentioned in the Mishna Berura there, 33-34. The "Cattle" translation is a good example why you should try your best to avoid translations if possible...


2

It would be at least לא תעמוד על דם רעך. And I would imagine much worse.


2

Shulchan Arukh, Orach Chayyim 554:17: אבל ומנודה שמהלכים בדרך מותרים בנעילת הסנדל וכשיגיעו לעיר יחלוצו וכן בתשעה באב >מיימוני והגהות מרדכי ריש פרק קמא): Shulchan Aruch seems to suggest a general leniency to wear shoes when walking in a public thoroughfare consisting of mainly non-Jews. Magen Avrham explains: Magen Avraham 554:17: מותרים בנעילת. ...


2

According to http://shiurim.rabbibelovski.com/i/48.brushing%20teeth.shabbat.pdf (And note all the source there) The English Summary at the bottom: Given the number of distinct issues involved in brushing teeth, theoretically, there could be numerous opinions regarding which issues we must be concerned with and which issues are not of concern to us. ...


2

Zadon Shabbos, knowing that it's Shabbos, does not mean that he knows every aspect of Shabbos. It means he knows that it's Shabbos. As Rashi heichi mashkachas lah says, that he knows it's Shabbos. The only thing is that too know it's Shabbos, you need to know at least one biblical law, or else in what way do you know it's Shabbos? We see later in the gemara, ...


2

So you're asking a very broad question here. The short answer to your question is that there is a melacha of Tearing (קורע) besides for the issue of the perforations (מחתך). First is the issue of Tearing, on which there are different opinions. To quote myself in another answer: The Shulchan Aruch HaRav (340:17) (and I believe, the Minchas Chinuch) holds ...


2

The Shulchan Aruch 339:7 implies that one is only allowed to enter a docked boat if he is not moving it around: סְפִינָה, אִם הִיא יוֹשֶׁבֶת בְּקַרְקַע הַיָּם וְאֵינָהּ שָׁטָה כְּלָל, מֻתָּר לִכָּנֵס בָּהּ; וְאִם הִיא קְשׁוּרָה כְּמִנְהַג הַסְפִינוֹת הָעוֹמְדוֹת בַּנָּמֵל, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁהִיא שָׁטָה עַל פְּנֵי הַמַּיִם, מֻתָּר לִכָּנֵס בָּהּ. One ...


2

He should not risk his life. Instead, he should violate Shabbat in order to stay safe. The first thing a person should do when they see that Shabbat is approaching and they are likely to get stuck, is get on the phone with a Rabbi, ideally one several time zones over. (Always good to have a Californian Rabbi in your phone). He should seek to minimize ...


2

Shulchan aruch harav 340.6 below (See footnotes there for original sources). Brings that it is permitted to write in the are or on the table without ink becouse it does not leave any mark at all I guess making letters with your hands is similar and is permitted since it is not even remotely similar to writing and it was not decreed upon. I guess the ...


1

One may do so, provided it's tied to something on the shore. [Obviously, he won't get very far.] Shulchan Aruch 339:7. However, see the commentaries there for details and exceptions. And, if this is a practical question for you, ask your rabbi rather than relying on what you read on this site. Note that there's no explicit prohibition on "traveling", though ...


1

Rabbi Dovid Rabiat is brought in the footnote (#11,12) of your Pathways article as a source for explaining the idea of avoiding the smearing or spreading of foods for simply aesthetic purposes, on Shabbos. Rabbi Dovid Rabiat on page 921 and 925, points out that in order to ever violate the law of "Memarayach" (smoothing) on Shabbos, one would need to apply ...


1

As a general rule, you're allowed to return a cooking pot to the heat source on two conditions: 1) If, at the moment you took it off, you took it off with the intention of returning it; 2) The pot is in your hands continuously, and is never rested on anything else, until you return it. I don't have a source for this, but that's the halacha as I've always ...


1

A competent rabbi should be consulted in all such cases. A similar case is discussed here where the questioner wants to know what to do if he's in a hotel where the rooms are accessed by a magnetic card. The rabbi answers that he should ask the hotel staff for a conventional key. If that fails, he can ask a non-Jew to open the door for him (since one is ...


1

Perhaps one may suggest the following. Simply speaking, chesron mammon is an actual loss of money, as opposed to losing out on potential gain, as the gemaras in Moed Katan (2b, 3a, see there) seem to imply. The Torah only forbade work that has a halachic name of "melacha" (the 39 of shabos etc.) with the exclusion of techumim, crossing the line of permitted ...


1

A bag containing food is a one-use item and is discarded after it is emptied. Conversely, a can (such as a tin of tuna fish) is capable of being re-used and must therefore be rendered useless before opening (typically by punching a hole in the bottom) to avoid committing the melacha of makeh bepatish - finishing a utensil (literally: the final hammer blow). ...



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