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Journal of Halacha & Contemporary Society, No. XXI - Spring 91 - Pesach 5751 has an article by Rabbi Michael Broyde - Adjunct Assistant Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School, and Rabbi Howard Jachter - Associate Rabbi of Congregation Beth Judah in Brooklyn which gives Rabbi Auerbach's opinion in his own words. The article concludes that current ...


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Shulchan aruch harav 340.6 below (See footnotes there for original sources). Brings that it is permitted to write in the are or on the table without ink becouse it does not leave any mark at all I guess making letters with your hands is similar and is permitted since it is not even remotely similar to writing and it was not decreed upon. I guess the ...


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In terms of deriving benefit from the actions done by a Jew on Shabbat the Shulchan Aruch (OC 318:1 and Mishna Berurah and Biur Halacha there) distinguish between a number of cases: If a biblical prohibition was violated purposefully (deoraita bemeizid) then no one can derive benefit from it for the rest of shabbat, and the violator himself cannot derive ...


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I can see that just the 3rd verse would seem confusing, and I was puzzled by this one, as well. All work (that is, the 39 categories of melacha assigned for Shabbat) are prohibited except for melacha that is necessary for food consumption such as cooking, baking, slaughtering, etc. (I won't delve, here, into the "extension" of the rule such as carrying ...


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Dose of Halacha writes that there are 2 issues - 'sefiyah' and 'chinuch'. He brings sources that allows you to have a young child (too young to understand) do melacha: The Gemara (Sukka 42a) writes that parents are obligated to teach and train their children to do mitzvos before they become bar / bas mitzva. This obligation, chinuch, only applies when a ...



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