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15

There are nine possible reasons not to use Eletricity on Shabbat Opinions about eletricty range from deorita, d'rabanan and technially, not really an issur. The two most commonly cited sources on the topic are the Chazon Ish and R. Auerbach who's opinions on this vary greatly. Igniting a fire The basic example of using eletricity, (turning on an ...


15

Yes. Women should formally end shabbat before lighting a havdala candle after shabbat has ended, i.e. after nightfall on Saturday. First of all, women certainly can daven maariv and say attah chonantanu. Second, the Rama in OC 299:10 quotes an opinion that the only reason labor is forbidden before havdala is lest one forget to say havdala. Accordingly, ...


13

In terms of deriving benefit from the actions done by a Jew on Shabbat the Shulchan Aruch (OC 318:1 and Mishna Berurah and Biur Halacha there) distinguish between a number of cases: If a biblical prohibition was violated purposefully (deoraita bemeizid) then no one can derive benefit from it for the rest of shabbat, and the violator himself cannot derive ...


12

"Dosh (threshing) is the fifth of the 11 agricultural melachos. It involves removing something edible from its natural casing." OU.org. I would hardly say that the ketchup bottle is its natural casing... And in case you meant S'chitah: "S’chitah involves squeezing or wringing something out in order to extract a liquid" - which you're not doing here...


12

אין צביעה באוכלין -- There is no [prohibition of] dyeing with respect to food. Some relevant info from here: Is one permitted to add food coloring to food on Shabbos? One of the 39 prohibited labors on Shabbos is צובע or Coloring because in the process of the building of the Mishkan we find that they would dye wool that was used for making the ...


12

The Shut Hor Yizchak (Hor Hachaim 157) says that not only it is OK, but the question not even starts ("he did nothing"). The example he gives is to call from Israel to the States on Motzei Shabat. In Israel it is after Shabat and in the States the Shabat is still on. He adds that it is even permissible to phone a non Jew and ask him to do work for you. I ...


11

The prohibited labor category of "threshing" applies only to removing agricultural items from their natural container (such as threshing wheat, or squeezing juice from grapes); or wringing out absorbed liquid from something porous (such as a cotton cloth). The plastic container is not the "natural" container, and the ketchup is not currently absorbed in the ...


11

The source for all the melachos comes from the actions done to build (or operate) the Mishkan. Writing was used to make symbols on the boards that made up the outer walls. They were used so that when the Mishkan was disassembled and reassembled they would know which boards went where. Two letters (one on each board) were used to mark which boards matched ...


11

There is an argument between different Rabbis: Igros Moshe says that one is prohibited to invite someone to a synagogue if the only way one will be able to get there is by car. He says that there are several issues: Lifnei Iver (he is like one who places a stumbling block). He says this applies even if the people whom he invites live close enough to the ...


10

From Rabbi Torczyner: • May I braid challah on Yom Tov? This is actually more complex than it may sound. On the one hand, acts from kneading and onward in the bread-making process are permitted on Yom Tov. On the other hand, the reason we don't braid dough is because it is "construction", and construction is prohibited on Yom Tov. Indeed, Rav Shlomo ...


10

As noted in the comments, using electricity is melacha and thus forbidden on Shabbat. See this question for more information about why electricity is prohibited. Since, so far, it is not possible to ask and answer questions on Mi Yodeya without using electricity, the Shabbat-observant participants here do not engage in those activities on Shabbat. (Or Yom ...


9

Opening an umbrella on Shabbat is generally considered to be forbidden because of building. The linked article notes that while the g'mara (not specifically cited) does permit opening a folding chair, even though that creates a "tent" over the ground below, the purpose of opening the chair isn't to create the tent, while the purpose of erecting a structure ...


8

I am going to deal with the bleeding first. Shulhan Arukh O"H 320:20 There is an opinion who holds that when eating berries and other dyeing fruits one must take care not to touch one’s clothes or a cloth with fruit-colored hands, but if one colors bread with the coloring liquid it is not a problem because there is no prohibition to color ...


8

It's known as grama, or "indirect causation." It was written up well in a Journal of Halacha & Contemporary Society article many years ago, I believe as: Rabbi Tzvi Sendler, Gramma in Halacha, XXXIX, 23 (And Jake, it's not as clear that the same concept would apply to other mitzvahs; the threshold for Sabbath-prohibited labor is higher because it ...


8

No, it is not permitted to use a Kindle or any other electronic e-reader on Shabbat or Yom Tov (Chol Ha'Moed may be a different story). There are two primary halachic issues with using such a device on Shabbat or Yom Tov: The usage of electricity The creation of letters The Usage of Electricity There is a debate amongst contemporary poskim as to what ...


8

The Shulchan Aruch Harav writes (based on a Yerushalmi) that if one who spits into the wind, and the wind spreads it out, he violated the Shabbos prohibition of Zora (winnowing). He adds that it may be only a Rabbinic prohibition, as it is a Melacha Sheina Tzricha Legufa. However, in Hilchos Pesach he writes that in order for one to violate Zora one must do ...


8

Rav Aharon Lichtenstein discusses the issue here and quotes Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach as permitting, provided one let them know that sleeping arrangements in the area can be provided. Rav Lichtenstein himself tends to agree, especially if there is a Jewish-educational aspect involved.


8

Rambam Hilchos Shabbos 10:11 says that gluing two pieces of paper together on Shabbos is a Toldah (offshoot) of Tofer (the biblical prohibition against sewing on Shabbos). המדבק ניירות או עורות בקולן של סופרים, וכיוצא בו--הרי זה תולדת תופר וחייב One who glues pieces of paper or leather to each other with scribe's glue (קולן של סופרים), or anything ...


7

The basic answer is no, but it's an interesting question. Firstly, many blogs are hosted by some company, so you don't even own your blog. Even if you hosted it on your own server, this was settled 1800 years ago. The Torah says you need to let your animals rest; what about your machinery? ("Shvisas keilim"). We follow Beis Hillel that it's not a ...


7

I am quoting you Rabbi Ribiat The 39 Melachos: Some Poskim advise that one should not blow soap bubbles on Shabbbos because this entails a semblance of creating,which should be avoided.(One should also not deliberately form bubbles from bubble gum.)Nevertheless,one need not restrict young children from blowing the bubbles on SHABBOS.


7

Hunterp, hello and welcome to the site. The seventh chapter of tractate Shabbat lists the 39 categories of labor, or "melachos." Beginning in the very early 20th century, rabbis began looking at electric devices and trying to understand which category (or categories) of prohibited labor they were considered. For an excellent tracing of the issues back to ...


7

Aside from the electricity needed to change pages, I think the melacha that e-ink runs into is Tzovei'a (dyeing). You are not allowed to paint things, and color things, and dye things on Shabbat. The Kindle uses an Electrophoretic display, where basically, reflective titanium particles are suspended in a dark fluid. They are electrically charged to move to ...


7

I have heard, I believe from Rabbi Daniel Stein, that Rav Soloveitchk is quoted as crafting the following logic: Chicken soup, unlike water, does not as a practical reality lose its cooking (azil lei bishulei) when cooled. If I have water, boil it, and let it cool, it is basically back to where I started. If I cook soup, and let it cool, I have cold ...


7

http://ohr.edu/ask_db/ask_main.php/203/Q2/ Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Aurbach, zatzal, prohibits making toys - like a boat, or hat - by folding paper, since it is like making a utensil. However, if the paper was folded into a toy before Shabbat, it is permitted to use it on Shabbat. Sources: Shemirat Shabbat Kehilchata Ch.16:19


7

Rambam, Shabas 1:3, says: Someone who does so on purpose, we hit him with a smiting for rebellion (makas mardus). That is, bes din does.


7

Great question! This is part of a major machlokes rishonim in maseches beitzah. The Ran in the beginning of the 3rd chapter says that really all melachos are allowed on a Biblical level, but the sages forbade melachos that are generally done for a long time, as harvesting is generally done on an entire field, not just what you need for that meal. ...


6

With regard to small children: "... it is forbidden to instruct or cause a child to violate a prohibition even is the child is below the age of chinuch" (the age where a parent is obilgated to instuct his child in mitzvot) (in this case likely around the age of 4). "...it is permitted to place a forbidden item in front of a child, even though the child ...


6

Generally one is prohibited from instructing anyone to do melachah ("work") on Shabbos (The Sabbath), but although many of the reasons to prohibit instructing a non-Jew from preforming melachah can conceptually be applied to instructing a child as well the two cases are distinct from each other in many ways. A Jewish child is required to be trained in the ...


6

Any reason this isn't analogous to winding up a mechanical watch that's currently ticking (on-time)? The watch case was discussed by R' Shlomo Zalman Auerbach IIRC; it was considered "fixing" the watch and prohibited. Heard in Rabbi Heinemann's discussion of Sabbath-mode ovens.


6

If you have your own child do a melacha for you, this is certainly a violation of atta uvincha uvitecha and is worse than having a non-Jew (who is not your servant) do the melacha for you, which is only rabbinic. The sugya which you bring is talking about a generic minor who does the melacha.



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