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The Talmud (Megilah 13A) does not reference the Hebrew word for wife, but the Hebrew word for someone in the inner family circle. In this regard, the Talmud here draws the comparison to 2 Sam 12:3, where Uriah the Hittite had groomed young Bathsheba to be his wife. The Greek Septuagint therefore translates the passage here in Esther as follows: When her ...


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Esther said in Tehillim, liphnei kelev yechidasi. Hashem you have bowed down before a dog (Achashveirosh) my yechidah (the most sublime part of the neshama). So who is speaking (i.e. how can Esther talk about her neshamah as something owned by her and external to her)? This implies that because of the situation Esther was forced into she was forced to ...


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I think the simplest answer is probably the best. It only makes sense if it happened that particular night. It couldn't have been "one night". It was that night, ie.,, the night after the conversation with his wife, which followed his embarrassing encounter with Mordechai, which occurred on his way home from Esther's feast. It was the night preceding the ...


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6:4 shows Haman acting on the advice of 5:14, going to advise the king to hang Mord'chay. Thus, it's relevant to the story to point out that this occurred the very night after 5:14. (My own thoughts.)


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The answer to your first question is yes, one must hear the megillah (read live) both in the evening (after ma'ariv0 and during the day (usually after shacharis - but any time). A number of people point out that it should be done before fulfilling the other mitzvos of the day. Matanot l'Evyonim - Gifts to the Poor These gifts should be given by day. It ...


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As per this website, the obligation is to read/hear the megillah twice, once in the evening and once in the day. One cannot fulfill the obligation via an electronic medium, as per this.


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As far as when: Rambam, Laws of Megillah and Chanukah, 1:3. ומצוה לקרותה בלילה, וביום; וכל הלילה כשר לקריאת הלילה, וכל היום כשר לקריאת היום There is a mitzva to read it at both the night and the day. The entire night is appropriate for the night reading, and the entire day for the day reading. It's normally read in the evening after a Maariv ...



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