Hot answers tagged

5

The Maharal in Or Chadash on Megilas Esther explains that Hashem performs miracles in order to create a Kiddush Hashem. However, if the person involved in the rescue will take the credit then there is no Kiddush Hashem generated from this salvation, and it is therefore aborted. But, one who gives credit to whom it is due will surely make it known that it was ...


5

They do. You can see in the Karaite Jews of America website that they celebrate Purim on a similar date (though in Adar I in leap years).


4

The Targum there translates it as "זרעא דצדיקיא"; righteous seed. She could have known earlier that Mordechai was Jewish, but not specifically righteous. See also Gemorah Megilah 16b which interprets this line as, ”If Mordechai desends from the tribes of Yehudah etc. you will not not be able to prevail over him. However, if he is from one of the other ...


4

Shadal, while commenting on the word זמרת in Exodus 15:2, discusses cases where there is a kamats instead of the expected patach (or other reduction) in smikhut. The cases he mentions are: Isaiah 11:11 "שאָר עמו", Isaiah 45:13 "גָלותי" Esther 1:4 "יקָר תפארת גדולתו", Esther 1:20 "פתגָם המלך", Esther 4:8 "כתָב הדת", Job 34:25 "מעבָדיהם", II Chronicles 31:3 ...


3

Tora T'mima to Ester 2:22 (note 44) explains that the intent is obvious: From anything said in the name of its sayer, it's possible that over time some honorable matter will come about that one cannot foresee or assess ahead of time. And the one who said this used a language of "redemption" in light of the incident here.


3

In general, geulah seems to mean restoring something to its proper place (e.g. an enslaved person removed from his family/home or ancestral property removed from its owner). Chazal are perhaps noting that this is even the case with something as seemingly trivial as ascribing proper authorship where due. As such, one could suggest that once an idea/words are ...


3

According to the Maharal in Ohr Chadash (on Megillas Esther) it means that you fast at the end of the first day, the whole 24 hours of the second day and a part of the third.


3

Haman may have restrained himself because of Mordechai’s status as an adviser of the king. Yalkut Shimoni 1053 says that the position of Mordechai at the king's gate was personally requested by Esther to Achashverosh. If he killed Mordechai at that time, the anger of the King and the Queen would turn against him. The Ginzei Hamelech (quoted here) makes a ...


3

The Gemara in Megila 11a expounds the repetitive nature of this statement as meaning he was the same old evil person from the beginning to the end. הוא אחשורוש הוא ברשעו מתחילתו ועד סופו


3

As far as when: Rambam, Laws of Megillah and Chanukah, 1:3. ומצוה לקרותה בלילה, וביום; וכל הלילה כשר לקריאת הלילה, וכל היום כשר לקריאת היום There is a mitzva to read it at both the night and the day. The entire night is appropriate for the night reading, and the entire day for the day reading. It's normally read in the evening after a Maariv ...


2

According to Rabbi Moshe Isserles (the REMA) in the Mechir Yayin al Megillat Esther, they would be proper converts because: Fear of the Jews had fallen upon them (8:17) Or, "that which the Jews feared fell upon them "--the awe of Heaven experienced by the Jews was of such intensity that it infused even their countrymen, inspiring them to convert. ...


2

Alshich explains that if Mordechai is the progeny of King Saul...................... Seems like everyone knew that Mordechai was a Jew, however they did not know what his roots were.


2

Regarding the 20 districts division of Achaemenid Empire by Herodotus, David Asheri in the book "A Commentary on Herodotus Books I-IV" (Oxford University Press, 2007, p. 481) states: "(...) the twenty satrapies constitued a great administrative network; that many of them were divided into sub-satrapies or districts with subordinate governors, that ...


2

I think it is reflective of her personality. In the first instance, during Haman's rise, he is discussing plans with "אוהביו" - his loved ones. They are supporting him, egging him on... most likely being yes-men in general. After things start to turn sour, and Haman is losing the King's good grace, then all of a sudden they turn around and become ...


2

I don't see (in my Lublin-style Mikraos G'dolos) any commentary note how many days the Nineveh folks fasted. I'd have to assume, absent other knowledge, that they fasted until the end of the day the fast was proclaimed, or maybe only the entire next day. (That's what I'd do if an announcement were made in the king's name that everyone must fast, with no ...


2

Qiẓur Shulḥan 'Arukh - Yalqut Yosef (Oraḥ Ḥayim 692:13-14) states (my translation): אסור לאכול קודם קריאת המגילה, ואין חילוק בזה בין קריאת המגילה של לילה לקריאת המגילה של יום [סי' תרצב ס''ד ומשנ''ב שם]... ומכל מקום מותר לטעום פירות קודם קריאתה, וכן פחות מכביצה פת או עוגה, ולשתות תה או קפה. והמחמיר שלא לטעום כלום תבוא עליו ברכה... It is forbidden to ...


2

Note that the word אם (if) is not in the mishna. I would read it as "they read". You can have the case in which it was announced before Adar that there would be an Adar Sheni and people may or may not read in Adar Rishon as well as the case in which it is not announced until after Purim. This teaches that even though you might think that a late announcement ...


2

Seder Olam, 29 seems to present a reason when states that they were the ones who had written accusations against the inhabitants of Judah and Jerusalem in Ezra 4:6.


2

It appears from this site that the answer is no, one is not yotzei (CYLOR, of course). In the course of the discussion there was brought up the idea of "if someone missed words can he say them from his own printed book" and to support this, someone said, "I heard otherwise from one of the biggest poskim in Yerushalayim. He said that if one misses a few ...


2

As per this website, the obligation is to read/hear the megillah twice, once in the evening and once in the day. One cannot fulfill the obligation via an electronic medium, as per this.


2

The answer to your first question is yes, one must hear the megillah (read live) both in the evening (after ma'ariv0 and during the day (usually after shacharis - but any time). A number of people point out that it should be done before fulfilling the other mitzvos of the day. Matanot l'Evyonim - Gifts to the Poor These gifts should be given by day. It ...


2

6:4 shows Haman acting on the advice of 5:14, going to advise the king to hang Mord'chay. Thus, it's relevant to the story to point out that this occurred the very night after 5:14. (My own thoughts.)


1

Ben Y'hoyada (M'gila 15) explains (in my loose translation): How is it implied from this verse [that citation leads to redemption]? With God's help, it appears to me that one can answer as follows. Why didn't Mordechai himself go to the king? He saw with ruach hakodesh that this matter occurred now in order to reap its benefit later, when needed. If he ...


1

I'm afraid I have no source for this, but my reading of Esther 8:1 is that she revealed to Achashverosh only that Mordechai was her uncle, and did not tell him that he was also her husband.


1

UPDATE I removed the reference to the haftarah as it is not analogous to the megillah. However that discussion is found at Reading the Haftorah From Printed Materials However, I have found references that speak of the other for megillos Megillas Esther has the requirements of reading from a klaf as part of the mitzvah and one would not fulfill the mitzvah ...


1

Noda B'Yehuda 41 - page 44 - column starting with Vnashiv says that they should make Kiddush Levana first for two reasons. One is tadir. The other is that the Megila can always be done later, however Kiddush Levana there is a risk of it getting cloudy.


1

Magen Avraham 690:6 implies very strongly that one cannot fulfil his obligation by hearing the m'gila from a printed book. He's commenting on the Shulchan Aruch, which says: Someone holding in hand a m'gila that is not valid should not read with the designated [reader] but be quiet and listen. Magen Avraham comments (in part, citing Bes Yosef): ...


1

If you read the introduction to the book at the HebrewBooks.org link, it says that the publisher (apparently not the translator), Ben Tzion Krinfis was given the material in Arabic sometime between 1935 and 1948 by Rabbi Yaacov Moshe Toledano. Krinfis refers to Rabbi Toledano as the 'Rav HaRoshei of Yaffo (meaning Tel Aviv). A link to Rabbi Toledano is ...


1

I have a suspicion that Achashveirosh knew that he didn't know who Esther was, ein Esther magedes vechulei. And that he thought Esther was now ready to reveal her identity for a price (ad chatzi ha'malchus). When he addresses Esther in the second tense without using her title he means, 'Go on, tell me the secret.' When he addresses her as Esther ha'Malkah ...


1

See Malbim's explanation. The gist of what he states is: Haman had planned to tell Achashverosh about his plan to hang Mordechai. When he arrives at the palace (while he was supposedly sleeping, yet - not what Zeresh advised, as she said to go in the morning),not only does Haman not have a chance to tell Achashverosh of his plans, but he ends up leading his ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible