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This is an interesting question. I have not an abolute response but perhaps some matter for thinking. Look at the berayta of Androginoss (known as 4th chapter of Massechess Bikurim) The androginoss has some similitude to male and some similitude to female. In matter of Ychud he is considerated as forbidden with man or women. A first parenthesis is that ...


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I found a reference by google but it seems to say that there is no reference by any talmudic sources at all. The only reference given is to Josephus. I did not find any Jewish references to it in google. Pool of Bethesda The area of the Pools of Bethesda has always had a source of water. In the days of the Old Testament, the area was outside the city ...


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There is a book called Sefer Haredim that classifies Mitsvoss following the human organs. See in Sefer Hahinuch Mizvah 169 ולכן הזהירתנו התורה כי בהגיע אל האדם החלי הרע, והוא הצרעת, שלא יקחנו דרך מקרה, רק יחשב מיד כי עונותיו גרמו וירחיק מחברת בני אדם כאדם המרחק מרע מעשיו, ויתחבר אל המכפר המרפא שבר החטא ויראה אליו נגעו, ובעצתו ובדבריו ובפשפוש מעשיו יוסר ...


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I know from Zohar I think that fingers of hands (and feet) represent 10 commandments. Right arm first five and left arm second five. So if you have a pain in the right arm it is likely you are violating all first five commandments. If it is just one finger then it is just one commandment. Tabernacle (and Temple) were also designed to mimic human body of ...


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The Torah heals by telling us that prayer heals. The Jewish book of healing was destroyed so that people will pray. Mishna Brochos 5.5 They used to say about him, about Rabbi Chanina ben Dosa: When he would pray for the sick, he would say: This one will live and this one will die. They said to him: How do you know? He replied to them: If the prayer is ...


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R Meir (Shabbos 67a) permits wearing a fox's tooth on Shabbos as a sleep aid. The Rambam (Hil' Shabbos 19:13) rules like Rav Meir. Chullin 77b discusses whether such "cures" would qualify as adopting foreign customs, derekh Emori, and thus prohibited. The Ran (ad loc) explains that anything that healed three times is considered a verified cure. (A ...


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The prohibition of taking medicine for someone who is only slightly ill comes for the gezeiro/decree of shehikas sammonim (grinding materials to make the medicine) as it says in Pninei Halocho הוסיפו חכמים וגזרו על מי שסובל ממיחוש או מקצת חולי שלא יעסוק כלל ברפואות, היינו שלא יאכל או ישתה תרופות, ולא יסוך את גופו בתרופות, ולא יעשה פעולות שנועדו ...


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The background to this discussion is that the Torah doesn't considers a person's body to be his to do what he wants with it. It is an instrument in the service of God. Here is how the Nishmat Avraham reports on different poskim views on the topic (vol 2 pp. 60ff) The Tzitz Eliezer forbids one to undergo plastic surgery in the absence of disease or ...


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Written Torah is pretty strict when it comes to body alterations. I.e Vaikra 21:5 prohibits altering a hair line or making marks on a body for the dead. I think cosmetic surgery, just like abortion, should only be done when it is medically justifiable. Plastic surgery is dangerous so it should not be something people casually do. Obviously it should not be ...


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The real question here is not so much what are the components of the medication but rather whether or not it has a good taste. If it has no taste, it doesn't require a blessing at all. We only say blessings on food that have good taste (ha'naat grono, pleasure of the throat) or nutritional value (water has no taste but we still enjoy it when thirsty). If ...


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With certain limitations it is permissible. Here is a great link to a brochure on tefillin use from Rav Shimon Eider of Lakewood. He discusses borrowed tefillin on page 43. ...


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Shulchan Aruch O.C. 14:4 states that one may borrow someone's tallit without permission. Rema adds that this rule applies to tefillin, as well. However, this article states that this assumes a few factors, most notably that the borrowing is occasional and the borrower has no reason to suspect that the owner may object to his borrowing his tefillin. In the ...


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For future reference, there are two more very relevant books on the topic in English. I read them both and they are excellent Third Key: Jewish Guide to Fertility by Baruch and Michal Finkelstein, with haskamot (approbations) from R Yisroel Belsky, R David Cohen (Brooklyn), R Zeev Leef. Relevant sections are those on assisted reproductive technology, ...



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