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11

There are places that count women to make the minyan; that's a different issue. Aaron's notion of "minyan kavua" sounds familiar; Rabbi Y. H. Henkin has an essay on the topic, if I recall: http://www.amazon.com/Responsa-Contemporary-Jewish-Womens-Issues/dp/0881257826/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1260672749&sr=8-3 UPDATED: Hat tip to R' Yahu ...


11

My understanding has been that a Mechitza is only required for a minyan Kavuah (a minyan that meets regularly at established times and place) While we continue to separate at private irregular minyam from custom and perhaps Tzniut, I don't think the lack of separation would prohibit participating in the Tefillah. In my personal opinion (and you should ask ...


11

Rabbi J.H. Henkin has an excellent essay, going from the Talmudic sources to his interpretation of modern-day requirements. I strongly recommend you start there. (Link is to Google Books; many good libraries have this book in English. I believe this essay is based on material he's previously published in She'elot UTeshuvot Bnei Banim, which is available as ...


9

The gemorah says that IN THE BEIT HAMIKDASH, the Men and women were separated during the "Simcha Beis Hashoeva" because the environment was so lax and fun and lightheaded they were afraid people would do inappropriate behavior in the Beit Hamkidash. After the destruction of the beit hamikdash, this concept was further used to create separate seating in the ...


7

From page 10 of here: It is expressly stated in the Commentaries Bayith Hadash Beth Shmu'el on Shulchan Aruch Eben ha-Ezer 62, that the formula, "We will bless our G-d in whose abode is joy," is not to be recited at the Grace after a wedding feast [as it usually would be], if men and women are found together in one room-because there is no joy in ...


6

Gud Asik (Lit: the wall goes up) is a halacha lemoshe misinai. It considers a pre-established "wall" to continue upwards infinitely. The wall must be a minimum of 10 tefachim from the ground and within 3 tefachim from the groundfor this halacha to apply. It is used for the good and the bad: Example A: If a mekom petur- say a 6 foot clothesline pole- was ...


6

Here is a publication titled "The Mechitza according to the Halacha", by Rabbi Sholom Yehuda Gross, Shlit"a, who is the head of the Rabbinical Court of Holmin, (taken from here). It brings many sources with citations you can use for further research.


6

The Shulchan Aruch rules (OC 362:3) that a mechitza which came into being by itself counts as a mechitza at least for areas less than the amount of land you could plant 2 sa'ah of grain on (much bigger than your average backyard). So clearly at least for small areas like your backyard, the details of the mechitza's identity do not matter. Furthermore, I ...


5

The Chaye Adam (26:4) brings 2 separate answers: Whereas one may sit not involved in prayer in front of one who is mid-tefila if there is a 4x10 tefach partition, this possibly won't work for a passer unless the partition totally blocks the view of the davener to the passer. A 4x10 partition will work since we see that one may pass by the view of a davener ...


5

Since no one has bitten yet, I will try to answer quickly and confirm/find sources latter. According to those opinions, such as Rav Moshe Feinstein zt'l, who do no require a mechitza to obscure the view of the women's section one might think that no additional barrier is required on a balcony beyond what the ma'akeh needed for safety. Nevertheless Rav Moshe ...


5

Dancing with one's spouse in public when they could touch each other in private: ill-advised. Shulchan Aruch warns against excess physical affection with one's wife in public. (In "Fiddler on the Roof", Tevye demands that the rabbi rule whether it is absolutely forbidden, and the rabbi hesitates; it's a "shouldn't." Some measure of privacy is called for in a ...


5

I know my answer will make people angry, but whatever. When I was a child, weddings had separate dancing, no mechitzah. As I got older, bushes and plants were used to create a division between men and women on smaller dance floors. As I got even older, dance floors got larger, and giant 8-10 foot tall mechitzas were found in the middle of the wedding. And ...


4

When there is a collection of water that is unfit for ritual immersion of a person and some water is added to it, but not enough to make the collection fit for ritual immersion, it is possible to connect another collection of water, which is fit for ritual immersion - by means of a contiguous volume of water - above it and consider the water in the bottom ...


4

I would like to add as I've heard from Rav Shimshon Pinkus zt'l and more recently by Rav Shmuel Dishon at the Totah Vodaas Annual Bain Hametzorim gathering as well as on Tisha B'av day at Ateres Chynka that most people think of a mechitza as an exclusionary measure. In truth however it is an inclusionary measure. The standard use of a mechitza is in Shul for ...


4

According to R' Gil Student, touching affectionately during a slow dance would be forbidden biblically (according to the Rambam) or rabbinicaly (according to the Ramban). He says that there is also a ban on mixed dancing (even without touching) going back to the Maharam miRottenburg, and he says that R' Yehuda Henkin says that this ban is still in place he ...


3

There is a difference between a a private Shabbos Seuda and a wedding. By a private Seuda there usually is only family, however at a wedding you also invite others. Incidentally the Chasidim when they have a Mitzva Tantz and only the family remains, they take away the Mechitza. And when they make a Shabbos Sheva Brachos where there are others present back ...


2

According to ד"ר יוסף נדבה there was a Mechitza up until 5689 (1928) when it was removed by the British authorities.


2

The Shulchan Aruch (EH 21:1) rules: צריך אדם להתרחק מהנשים מאד מאד It is necessary for a man to distance himself from women to a great extent This obligation is, I would say naturally, some what subjective. Because of these subjectivity it seems that contemporary attitudes to this obligation vary from one extreme who treat it as a total platitude, to ...


2

To avoid Kalos Rosh. http://www.jemsem.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=153&Itemid=54


2

As I linked in the comments it can be found in Divrei Yoel 1:10. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=20289&st=&pgnum=78&hilite=


1

While there are no clear Teshuvos on the matter, R' Lawrence (Levi) Reisman wrote a letter into the Jewsh Press where he noted that: ..two of the four weddings Reb Moshe made had completely separate seating. At Reb Reuven’s wedding, there were some mixed tables to accommodate those from his wife’s side who wouldn’t sit any other way.. ..It would ...


1

other than the reasons people mentioned in the other answer, there's the simple rule that a man can't see women dancing, so there's the need to put something to cover his field of vision. I believe that because of the reality of today's generation you need to be more careful than in previous generations.



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