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11

No. Pigs are singled out by the Torah (Leviticus 11:7) as one of the unkosher animals that have a single kosher sign (they have split hooves but don't chew their cud), and as such, are Biblically prohibited. A Biblical prohibition cannot be overturned (Rambam's Laws of Foundations of the Torah 9:1). (According to some,) the kashrut laws were not instated ...


10

There is an Agadic opinion brought in Or Hachaim in parshas Shmini 11:7 that after the arrival of Moshiach, the pig will begin to chew its cud, and will at that point be Kosher.* Until that day, the Torah clearly gave two signs which we base our dietary laws upon which cannot be ignored. Whether or not Rabbis throughout the ages have tried to make keeping ...


10

See OU.org that broiling is an alternative method for Koshering meat. The Torah forbids the consumption of the blood of an animal. The two accepted methods of extracting blood from meat, a process referred to as “koshering”, are either salting or broiling.


8

See this article in Hebrew for more detail. The overall concept is based on Chulin 37b: (יחזקאל ד) ואומר אהה ה' אלהים הנה נפשי לא מטומאה ונבלה וטרפה לא אכלתי מנעורי ועד עתה ולא בא בפי בשר פגול הנה נפשי לא מטומאה שלא הרהרתי ביום לבא לידי טומאה בלילה ונבלה וטרפה לא אכלתי מנעורי שלא אכלתי בשר כוס כוס מעולם ולא בא בפי בשר פגול שלא אכלתי מבהמה שהורה בה חכם ...


7

Shepherds move herds. They help raise animals (which provide milk and wool, especially the sheep). There is nothing in the job description of a shepherd that requires killing animals.


7

First of all, meat can be eaten raw (unsalted, unroasted, un-anything, straight from the carcass) after just rinsing it (YD 67:2). Regarding salting, a non-trivial number of rabbinic authorities (even current ones) have allowed using sugar to 'salt' meat when salt was not an option (for availability or medical reasons). See this article for a sampling of ...


6

A person who eats on Yom Kipour does not make kiddush and have two challah rolls, plus meat and fish just as any other yom tov. The reason being that they should be eating as little as possible - just enough to keep alive & healthy. However, they do say יַעֲלֶה וְיָבֹא if they ate enough bread - as well as רְצֵה if it's also Shabbat. Enough bread: 27 ...


5

If you see the Mishna Brurah in Siman 552 he writes that's from the din of gemara,but regarding minhag its assur from Rosh Chodesh


5

People were vegetarians before the flood; the change is noted in Gen 9. But food isn't the only use for sheep. Hevel probably kept sheep for wool, since after the expulsion from the garden (Gen 3:23) people needed to clothe themselves. (God made clothes for Adam and Chava (3:21), but it doesn't say he continued to do so for everyone else.) Additionally, ...


5

These questions are dealt with here: The Shulchan Aruch (OC 551:9) writes that one mustn’t eat meat or drink wine during the nine days. The Rema (OC 551:10) adds that if one has a seudas mitzva during this time then one may partake of wine and meat as such celebrations are incomplete without them. This includes Shabbos meals, a bris seuda, a pidyon ...


5

Judaism believed that God commanded us not to eat pork, and that this will not change. (It is one of Maimonides' 13 Fundamentals of Belief that the Torah will not be exchanged for another.) It's true that some of the classical commentaries observed that avoiding pork may have certain health benefits, but that was icing on the cake. Irrespective of the ...


4

Form kashrut.com (Footnotes in that article point to other references:) All meat and poultry and their derivatives, even if no meat or poultry is actually visible, e.g., chicken soup, are included. Pareve dishes cooked in a utensil used for meat are permitted. [If a small piece of meat accidentally fell into a pareve dish and its taste will not be ...


4

Rabbi Daniel Neustat quotes the Yad Efrayim 551:31 and Divrei Yatziv 2:238 as permitting meat for a Seudas Bar Mitzvah on the day of the Bar Mitvzah. However, for this and all Seudas Mitzvah dispensations, if it is during the week that Tisha B'av falls out, only a minyan plus close relatives may partake of the meat and wine (Mishnah Berurah 551:77). Sha'ar ...


4

According to the source in this answer to that question, Rabbi Menachem Genack of the OU had been quoted as saying The tissue samples would have to come from an animal that had been slaughtered according to kosher rules


4

The Achronim (see for instance the Mishna Berurah in siman 476) addressed this quite clearly. The custom was to avoid confusion with the real sacrificial meat, and people aren't always that knowledgeable; so the custom became to avoid anything that the average person would call "roasted" as people might get confused -- even if it didn't meet the halachic ...


3

Excerpt from Star K The Fire It is preferable to broil the liver on a fire source that is directly below the liver. If that is not feasible, one may broil liver from a heat source above the liver. Hence, it would be permissible to broil liver in a broiler or in an electric oven, if that is the only broiling source available. If the oven or ...


3

The tongue has no inherent holiness. The Kohein may sell it or even give it as a gift to whomever he wants (even a non-Jew). (ShA YD 61:13)


3

If the chocolate was pareve, then based on YD 95:2, it would seem to be permitted to consume, even if some say it should not have been poured to begin with. If the chocolate was dairy then the pot, chocolate, and cheesecake are not kosher.


3

Raw, unsalted meat is completely kosher. Just rinse and eat. Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah siman 67 siff 2. EDIT. The Shach in siman 76 s.k. 2 also point out that unsalted roasted meat even if only rare is also permitted to eat. The point of my original answer was to dispel any misconceptions about blood, but this edit will answer the assumed question more ...


3

Dose of Halacha brings some sources for this debate and points out interestingly that while it is mentioned in the Shulchan Aruch, there is no mention of this in Rambam: The Mishna Berura (173:3) and Aruch Hashulchan (YD 116:10) quote the Magen Avraham (OC 173:1) who writes that this is one of many natural phenomena mentioned in the Gemara that no longer ...


3

R' Yaakov Shechter maintains that while it is very nice to have a minyan, it is not a necessity, and a Siyum is considered a 'Sedudas Mitzva' irrespective as to how many are present. כל ענין המניין הוא רק לחבב המצוה ולעשות את הסעודה לגומרה של תורה ברוב עם, אבל השמחה היא בעצם הסיום וראוי לערוך על כך סעודה גם בינו לבין עצמו ודינה כסעודת מצוה לכל דבר וענין. ...


3

In Hulin, Daf מו עמ' ב. The concept is perhaps not what you think it is. It is one of the Triefos, a hole in the lungs (called Sircha), which some Poskim (like Rashi) say that if you find some scar in the lung, you need to check if there is a hole, and others say that the scar indicates a hole no matter our further observations find, and the meat is Trief. ...


3

No, pigs will not be kosher food, not even when pigs learn to fly -- well, at least not until the Messiah comes or science finds a way to change the pig from a pig into something else a bit different. The Torah prohibits animals that can be eaten based on physical characteristics. Leviticus 11:1-32. A kosher animal among mammals must have a cloven hoof ...


3

See this list of "dried spices that are acceptable for kosher use without specific Kosher supervision" - Allspice is literally the first entry. Many spices are considered to not require supervision when by themselves. Blends require either supervision or a thorough spec sheet to ensure that the blend only contains spices (some blends use flavorants, sugars, ...


2

1) The fact that meat comes at the cost of killing an animal, we don't make a special Beracha. Similar to why we don't say Shehecheyanu by a Bris Milah because the child is in pain. 2) The animal itself gets its nourishment from vegetation, so in that sense it can't get a greater Beracha than its life source.


2

There is a reason for it. The Mechaber in OC 451:26Says: כו. כלי זכוכית אפילו מכניסן לקיום ואפילו משתמש בהן בחמין אין צריכים שום הכשר שאינם בולעים ובשטיפה בעלמא סגי להו. הגה: ויש מחמירין ואומרים דכלי זכוכית אפילו הגעלה לא מהני להו וכן המנהג באשכנז ובמדינות אלו My loose translation: Glass vessels even if one stores in them and even if they were used for ...


2

The basis of the custom is from the Arizal, who says that one who is careful from even a Mashehu (any amount) of Chametz on Pesach will not sin (accidentally) the whole year. Therefore as many stringencies as possible should be kept. This is brought in halachic Achronim, most notably the Ba'er Hetev on Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim (which is where it was most ...


2

There were certain intestines that were taken off the market by the F.D.A. along with animal feet. After reappearing on the market when regulations were laxed, the new generation simply had no interest. Especially if they are expensive and no longer on the taste pallet of your average person. As far as Rocky Mountain Oysters, all parts from the hind ...


2

According to the Beit Yoseph, certain sirchos are kosher without any further bedika (examination). These are sircha c'sidran and sircha b'dophen tsar. An animal which has such sirchot is kosher Beit Yoseph, but is not chalak. If it has no sirchos at all, it is chalak. The Rama himself did not allow those sirchos which the Beit Yoseph allowed, in fact the ...


2

Glatt and Chalak have different stringencies and leniencies relative to the other. From kosherpoint.com: Not all sirchot are equal. There are certain areas of the lung, where a sircha will not make the animal treif. However, there are differing opinions as to the extent of these areas. The Sephardi view (following the Beit Yosef) is more lenient – ...



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