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Rabbi Daniel Friedman, in an article entitle Pareve Meat (pp. 93-105), wrote a halachic analysis of this topic for the RJJ Journal of Halacha and Contemporary Society some years ago (Number LIII from Pesach 5767, Spring 2007). His analysis points to 3 possible conclusions: Not Kosher Kosher - Meat Kosher - Pareve Each of these successive conclusions ...


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The short answer "Because G0d said so" The longer explanation, fills up volumes of books explaining "why" Hashem said so. You can start with Maimonides "Moreh L'nivuchim' (Guide for the Perplexed), as well as all the books that comment on it. While one of the reasons for the laws may include the humane treatment, the laws of ritual slaughter are not just ...


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The Torah's prohibition: Don't cook mammal meat in mammal milk. To avoid confusion, the rabbis of the Talmud made the general rule: Don't cook any meat in mammal milk. So the simple answer is -- "because the rabbis didn't ban it." Presumably they were concerned that chicken-in-milk would get confused with beef-in-milk, but didn't feel that eggs ...


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An oral ruling of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein (recorded in Moadei Yeshurun pg 131 paragraph 8) states: One who extends the observance of Shabbos by accepting it earlier on Friday or keeping it longer Saturday night, may eat meat and drink wine or grape juice during the extended period. The footnote there (#62) references the oral ruling as well as one of ...


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Copied from my post to a similar question here: Rabbi Daniel Friedman, in an article entitle Pareve Meat (pp. 93-105), wrote a halachic analysis of this topic for the RJJ Journal of Halacha and Contemporary Society some years ago (Number LIII from Pesach 5767, Spring 2007). His analysis points to 3 possible conclusions: Not Kosher Kosher - Meat Kosher - ...


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While a Jew is only Chayav for Ever Min HaChai if he has consumed a Halachic Shiur (minimal amount for culpability), as the category of Shiurim does not extend to a non Jew, non-Jews are liable for Ever Min Hachai even for consuming only the smallest amount. (Sanhedrin 56a, 59b, Rashi; Chullin 102a,121b; Lev. 19:14; Pesachim 22b; Rambam, Melachim 9:10, 12.) ...


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Shulchan Aruch Yorah 63:1 tells us that the Rabbis decreed that any meat that has been out of eyesight of the Jew (even in his own house) is forbidden unless it has a sign on it, or the person can definitely recognize it. If it is wrapped and sealed it is not a problem. This is based on Rambam, Hilchot Ma'achalot Assurot 8:11, which in turn is based on ...


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The approach given in an Ask Moses article is derived from the previous Lubavitcher Rebbe zt”l. I extract some portions below which indicate that we have to be on the right spiritual level to eat meat. (But then, it seems to imply that one can eat it frequently). Necessity vs. Luxury The human being cannot live without the vegetable and mineral ...


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As you stated, the Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah 116:2 forbids the consumption of meat and fish products together, out of concern that it is unhealthy. Since this is a health issue, it should apply to all types of meat and fish. I say this because, if it only applied to certain types of fish and meat, then the Shulchan Oruch would have specified the cases in ...


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One may not reuse the Zeroa if it was cooked on Yom Tov since it is forbidden to cook on one day of a festival in order to eat the food on the second day or on a weekday. The Zeroa should be eaten by day since we do not eat roasted meat on the nights of Pesach. However if it was cooked prior to Yom Tov to the best of my knowledge there is no issue using the ...


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For a number of reasons, including that the cells are not visible to the naked eye and have changed beyond recognition, Rav Aviner shlita understand such meat to be kosher and parve but cautions that the matter must [ultimately] be decided by the leading Torah scholars.


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In a recent statement by COR - Kasruch Council of Canada, they say that it's too early for them to come up with an official position, but that they plan to do so "when the time comes." They preliminarily list the following "interesting halachick issues": The source animal would have to be kosher, and shechted. If the cells are taken from a live animal, ...


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As I answered here, I think the stem cells used to create artificial meat would be considered a Davar HaMa'amad (an item that causes the food to exist in its present form, and without it would not exist). a Davar HaMa'amad is never nullified, as such, in order for the artificial meat to be kosher, the stem cells would have to come from a kosher animal.



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