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11

Here is an answer from The Star-K. Similarly fish gelatin in order to be considered kosher must be produced from kosher species of fish. The use of fish gelatin with meat foods poses an interesting question. As we have mentioned the Shulchan Aruch (Yore Deah:116) prohibits cooking meat and fish together because of health concerns. When dealing with ...


7

The Talmud addresses this issue in Bava Kamma 41a: ת"ר ממשמע שנאמר (שמות כא, כח) סקל יסקל השור איני יודע שנבילה היא ונבילה אסורה באכילה מה ת"ל לא יאכל את בשרו מגיד לך הכתוב שאם שחטו לאחר שנגמר דינו אסור באכילה From the fact that it says "the bull shall be stoned" do I not know that it is neveilah (unslaughtered), and neveilah is forbidden to eat? ...


6

The Aruch Hashulchan 551:28 writes: ודע שיש שמניחים הסיום מסכת על ימים אלו, כדי לאכול בשר. ודבר מכוער הוא, דאף על גב דבמועד קטן (ט א) מוכח דמותר לשייר מקצת הגמר לסיום מצוה, כדאיתא שם בבניין בית המקדש עיין שם, מכל מקום להניח לכתחילה בשביל אכילת בשר – לא נאה ולא יאה.‏ ויש שלומדים לכתחלה מסכת כדי לעשות סיום בימים אלו, ודבר זה אפשר, כדי ...


3

While the talmudic passage quoted above is certainly relevant in this case, I don't think that it is necessary to even resort to such a source in this case. According to it's own interpretive methodology, the question was flawed from the beginning. The question was why the pasuq in Shemoth 21:28 needed to state "wa-lo ye'okhel eth besaro - and its meat ...


3

For your first question about needing to be told that the bull cannot be eaten, see this answer. Your other question is asks why we care about ownership; we care because there are uses for the carcass besides food. An animal that you can't eat, but are allowed to benefit from, can be sold to non-Jews. Non-Jews have no prohibition against eating it. They ...


2

A minor's siyum may not allow one to eat meat. A siyum on certain texts may not, either. Those are two possibilities, but, of course, as I was not privy to the conversation you overheard, I have no idea what the fellow's reaosn was.


2

It can cause leprosy. I heard this at a shiur (if I recall correctly, given by Rabbi Michoel Stern), but I found this online: http://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/ask-the-expert-meat-and-fish/ Edit: Pesachim 76b A fish was roasted [i.e., baked] together with meat, [whereupon] Raba of Parzikia forbade it to be eaten with kutah. Mar b. R. Ashi said: ...


1

This article says: Today, in the absence of the Temple, the mitzvah of the Korban Pesach is memorialized in the form of a symbolic food placed on the Passover Seder Plate, which is usually a roasted shankbone. Ashkenazic Jews have a custom of not eating lamb or goat during the Seder in deference to the absence of the Temple. Many Sephardic Jews, ...


1

Contrary to popular belief, it's not that simple for one to just go to a Siyum during the Nine Days and eat meat (and wine, as it's part of the same custom) at the meal. While undoubtedly it isn't forbidden, many authorities limit those who can partake of the meat to family and 'close friends' (defined as someone who you would invite to a meal at another ...



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