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24

I'm assuming you are talking about steak which has been processed under rabbinical supervision. Presently, in the US, with the exception of liver, all meat is salted to remove problematic blood by the certifying agency before it hits the stores and restaurants. So meat which is edible does not have to be cooked "enough" and rare is fine.


20

the question is more cultural than religious. The notion of mayo and white bread plays to the stereotype of the WASPish cuisine as opposed to the traditional eastern-european influenced foods which would have one expect traditional deli fare of pastrami on rye with mustard and maybe a pickle. the issue of dietary law is not at play here.


19

Taz (Orach Chaim 476:2) mentions such a custom. The people who did so were concerned that any kind of meat might be confused with roast (and as YS noted, the Ashkenazic custom is indeed not to eat roast meat at the Seder). However, he understands Tur to be saying that it is improper to do so, because the joy of Yom Tov includes eating meat; the best ...


18

What Monica answered above, that it is 'meat juice'. To find out in much greater detail about this, see here: No matter what the source of the issur, the Ran asks: We clearly observe that blood continues to come out of meat even after the salting process is over. Indeed this blood is sometimes even redder than the blood that was originally expelled. ...


15

There's no specific mitzvah to eat meat (except in connection with certain sacrifices, but those are in abeyance until the Holy Temple is rebuilt - may it be soon). There is a mitzvah to enjoy Shabbat and holidays, and for most people that includes eating meat. But it's somewhat subjective; if for a particular individual that would be a burden rather than a ...


15

Most of the other answers seem to be working under the assumption that the OP is basing the question on the prohibition against consuming blood (although this motivation is not stated in the question). Taking the question at its face value, however, the OP just wants to know how well meat needs to be cooked in order to be Kosher. As YDK's answer suggests ...


15

Chulin 8 / Yoreh Deah 87:3 - Rabbi Akiva holds that the prohibition of eating chicken with milk is Rabinnic (M'Drabanan) - the reason is to avoid confusion as people consider chicken meat. Fish would not be confused as it does not require slaughtering, however chicken does require slaughtering. Once eggs are laid they are completely developed; and they ...


14

SimchasTorah pointed to a fascinating comment from Meshech Chochmah (Rabbi Meir Simcha of Dvinsk, c. 100 years ago), let translate the entire quote: ... therefore, the fact that the Jews would [celebrate Passover by] eating flame-roasted lamb would not raise any questions, not even for the wicked son; as it's perfectly appropriate to celebrate a ...


14

To your last point, traditional caviar comes from sturgeon fish, which are not kosher. Eggs from kosher fish, such as whitefish, are kosher, so you can find kosher-certified "caviar" made of such eggs.


14

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/ninedays/ On Shabbos there is no restriction against eating meat or drinking wine even if one began Shabbos early - any time after plag ha-Minchah.


13

You don't say why you think a rare steak might be a problem. I've heard others ask this question based on the prohibition of eating blood -- "hey, if we're not supposed to eat blood, then what about steaks?". I'm answering on the assumption that this is your reason for asking. Chabad says that what's left in the meat after it's been kashered is juice, not ...


13

The Rambam writes (Hilchos Machalos Asuros Perek Beis Halocha Gimmel): האדם--אף על פי שנאמר בו "ויהי האדם, לנפש חיה" (בראשית ב,ז), אינו בכלל מיני חיה בעלת פרסה; לפיכך אינו בלא תעשה. והאוכל מבשר האדם או מחלבו, בין מן החי בין מן המת--אינו לוקה. אבל אסור הוא בעשה, שהרי מנה הכתוב שבעת מיני חיה ואמר בהן "זאת החיה אשר תאכלו" (ויקרא יא,ב)--הא כל שהוא ...


12

There are several potential kosher issues with veal. Treifa issues If an animal was seriously sick or wounded before it was kosher slaughtered, it is non-kosher (deemed "treifa", or "torn up"). R' Moshe Feinstein saw some very wobbly-looking calves, he was concerned if they were healthy enough. My understanding is we conclude that veal today doesn't have ...


12

No. A kosher animal must be specifically slaughtered and prepared according to Jewish laws in order for its meat to be kosher. These laws are very specific, governing the knife used, the method and stroke of the knife, the method for soaking/salting properly, and checking the innards for defects which would render the animal unkosher. If any of these laws ...


12

To get Kosher meat takes three main steps: choosing the right animal, killing it in the proper way, and removing non-kosher parts from it. (This is all an oversimplification, of course.) Choosing the right animal Kosher land mammals are those who chew their cud and have split hooves. Kosher birds are those that aren't one of the ones listed as not kosher ...


11

The article says that the this meat is created using stem cells from slaughtered animals: Using stem cells harvested from leftover animal material from slaughterhouses, Post nurtures them with a feed concocted of sugars, amino acids, lipids, minerals and all other nutrients they need to grow in the right way. When it comes to nullifying something ...


10

As I understand it, it wasn't actually stainless steel vs. something else (stainless steel hadn't yet been invented, anyway). It's more an issue of the shape of the blade in cross-section: the "old-style" knife was the same thickness top to bottom (and then the edge of this was sharpened, so in profile it would be trapezoidal); the "new" one (called סכין ...


10

The Meshech CHochmah on Bo in the Pargragh starting Ushmartem 11 lines in it says that the proper way to celebrate is to eat roasted meat see it for yourself http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14061&st=&pgnum=61


10

Who said that raw meat is inedible? The Shulchan Aruch rules in Hilchot Shabbat that raw meat is not Muktzeh on Shabbat since there are people who eat it as a delicacy (ie Steak Tartar).


10

http://www.youngisrael.org/content/PDFs/Halacha_Central/Halochoscope/hs14-10a.pdf A thermometer is used for a different type of measurement. The operative term is tikun ochel, accomplishing some positive change in the food. A utensil used to measure ingredients or portions performs such a function. A thermometer is used to decide whether the food ...


10

No. In theory (see Yore Dea chapters 3, 6, 7), it's possible to kill an animal with a really sharp arrow or thrown knife and render it kosher, but not practically.


9

Although the Torah says not to cook "in the milk of the mother", this is a common example, since the mother's milk is at hand. In actuality any meat is forbidden with any milk. (Tur Yore De'a 87, Shulchan Aruch YD 87:2)


9

Rasash Pesachim 53a writes that if a community's custom is not to eat roasted meat on the evening of 15 Iyar for the same reason it is not eaten on the night of Pesach, then they should not eat it. He writes that even in a community which doesn't have this custom, eating a full roasted lamb in the manner of the Korban Pesach would remain prohibited as that ...


8

According to the Star-K Tevila Guidelines, no tevila is required for a meat thermometer.


8

A drunk person should not slaughter, but if he did anyhow, as long as the technique was proper, the slaughter would still be good. In fact, even if he was so completely drunk as to be not cognizant of his actions ("as drunk as Lot") and he'd have the same halachic status as someone insane; the halacha is if someone insane did slaughter, and used the proper ...


8

According to here, Okapi is indeed kosher but is not the Zemer. According to here: The zemer, listed among the ten types of kosher animals in Deuteronomy (14:5), is identified as the giraffe by Rav Saadia Gaon, Rabbenu Yona, Radak, the Septuagint, and many others. According to here, land animals without a tradition of their kashrut cannot be ruled as ...


8

Shulchan Aruch (OC 476:2) writes that those who have the custom not to eat roasted meat on the Seder nights refrain from eating any type of meat that requires slaughtering, including chicken. Although the Korban Pesach could not be offered from such meat, we are still concerned people may come to permit other types of roast. However fish meat is ...


8

See this article in Hebrew for more detail. The overall concept is based on Chulin 37b: (יחזקאל ד) ואומר אהה ה' אלהים הנה נפשי לא מטומאה ונבלה וטרפה לא אכלתי מנעורי ועד עתה ולא בא בפי בשר פגול הנה נפשי לא מטומאה שלא הרהרתי ביום לבא לידי טומאה בלילה ונבלה וטרפה לא אכלתי מנעורי שלא אכלתי בשר כוס כוס מעולם ולא בא בפי בשר פגול שלא אכלתי מבהמה שהורה בה חכם ...


7

Tosafot (Sanhedrin 56B) says that Adam HaRishon was able to eat meat that had died by itself he just was not able to kill the meat and eat it. However, if one of the limbs of the animal fell off by itself, he was not allowed to eat it, because of the prohibition of Ever Min Hachai. Rambam holds that Adam wasn't given the prohibition of Ever Min Hachai. The ...


7

From Ohr Sameyach's archive, #156: Mix 1 fluid ounce of beef gravy with 59 fluid ounces of water. We don't have 1:60 yet, so the pot is "meaty." Then pour in 1 fluid ounce milk. The pot now contains 60:1 against the milk, but also 60:1 against the meat. It's therefore pareve. Compared to my previous answer: -- Both answers only work if there are no ...



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