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Matzah made with other liquids besides (instead of) water are called "matzah ashira" enriched matzahs. While some object to them because they undercut the "lechem oni" bread of affliction that water/flour matzot represent, there are other concerns regarding whether they create an environment for fermentation. Here is one treatment of the argument with the ...


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Given the proliferation of published commentaries on the Haggada these days, I'm sure there are an abundance of answers to this question. The two most famous answers, though, come from earlier commentaries. The first from Abarbanel, who asks this in connection to what "לחם עוני" means. What is "poor bread"? Answering that "poor" refers to the composition of ...


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Rav Herschel Schachter has written a Teshuvah that Ashkenazim may eat soft Matzah. See here* for a discussion of his Teshuvah and some follow-up questions and answers about it. *Be advised that this is taken from a commercial site selling a product under the umbrella of "approved by Rav Schachter". It is, however, a real Teshuvah, and the discussion that ...


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The classic answer to your question is a Rashi in Shemos 12:15 For seven days you shall eat unleavened cakes-: But elsewhere it says: “For six days you shall eat unleavened cakes” (Deut. 16:8). This teaches us regarding the seventh day of Passover, that it is not obligatory to eat matzah, as long as one does not eat chametz. How do we know that ...


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I heard from Rabbi Yosef Fox the following: Perhaps the idea is to contrast the ideas of slavery and freedom, they are relatives. Through the side by side contrast emerges a greater understanding of what slavery is (under the whims and emotions of man) and what freedom is (under the system of mitzvoth that guide a person to a life of חכמה which is true ...


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Here's an interesting perspective from Chabad.org: ... the poor person’s lack of possessions allows him a type of freedom from the burden of the physical world. True, his independence comes at a price that few of us would be willing to pay; still, conceptually he represents autonomy, and stands in stark contrast to the slave, who is completely tied to ...


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The sefer Binyan Ariel here writes: According to what would appear to be the simple understanding of this stanza - that on all other nights we can eat either chametz or matzah, whichever our heart desires - it should have written “we eat either chametz or matzah”, like it wrote in the last stanza “we eat either sitting or ...



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