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15

With the early machines in the late 1800s, they'd have a giant roller cranking out a huge flat sheet of dough, then use big cookie-cutters on it. If you used round cookie-cutters, you'd either have to throw away all the dough in between the circle shapes, or would feel pressured to rework it within the 18 minutes, which is going to be hard to do. Therefore ...


15

R' Eizik Vitebsker writes (look in Os 26) that the origin of this Chumra was from the Mezritcher Maggid. R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi explains that since some opinions say that flour which was baked (without being kneaded first) can still become chometz after contacting water as it may not have been baked well. He writes that (at least in his time) one could ...


15

Very good question. The Piskei Tshuvos 5:492 brings down that scrupulous individuals are accustomed to eat matzah on peasach sheni. In footnote 9, he brings down that in the siddur Yaavetz (Rav Yaakov Emden) that it was revealed to him from the heavens that the kedusha of pesach and matzah lasts until pesach sheni because when they went out from Egypt they ...


12

This custom is known as gebrochts (Yiddish for "broken"); or "matza shruya" (soaked matza) in modern Hebrew. It's prevalent in many Hassidic and Hassidically-influenced communities, though many first encounter it with Lubavitch. The custom arose out of concern that there may be a packet of dry flour in your matza. If that flour never reacted with water, ...


11

If such matzos are rare or nonexistent, it's because they don't fit as well in a box and thus require either a round box, which costs more to make and assemble, or both more box space per matza, taking up valuable room in shipping etc., and empty space in each box, increasing the likelihood of breaking matzos. Source (so to speak): conjecture.


10

An original source of this custom is the Sheyare Knesses HaGedola Siman 471:3 where he writes that the custom in Kushta (Istanbul) is to avoid eating matza as of Rosh Chodesh Nissan.


10

Matzah made with other liquids besides (instead of) water are called "matzah ashira" enriched matzahs. While some object to them because they undercut the "lechem oni" bread of affliction that water/flour matzot represent, there are other concerns regarding whether they create an environment for fermentation. Here is one treatment of the argument with the ...


9

The roots of this minhag actually lie in the Gemara itself. In Pesachim 40b, there is a discussion which says explicitly that Rav Papi allowed servants in the beit Reish Galuta to thicken a tavshil with "chasisi." The Rif says this is matzah meal; Tosafot say it is lentil flour, and Rashi says it is dried flour. Rava says we need to be concerned in a place ...


8

The Gemara in Pesachim 46a (brought in the Rambam Laws of Chametz 5:13 and the Shulchan Aruch OC 459:2) says that if one leaves dough for the length of time that it takes to walk 1 "mil" (a Talmudic unit of distance) then it becomes Chametz. Opinions regarding the time it takes to walk a mil vary from 18-24 minutes, and here we are strict to take the shorter ...


8

Extra watched: to make sure that no water touches it (except while it's being kneaded), because water is needed to start the fermentation process, which would make it chametz. The soul is connected to G-d, like a limb of the body is connected to the heart (for its blood supply) and the brain (for its functionality). "Cut off" means just that - that ...


7

It is prohibited to eat Matzah on Erev Pesach, however cooked or boiled matzah-meal products are permitted according to all the Poskim. Fried Matzah-meal products, however, should be avoided (see Sha'ar ha-Tziyun 444:1). Baked Matzah-meal products, such as cakes or cookies, are prohibited; Harav S.Z. Auerbach (Erev Pesach Shechal b'Shabbos, pg. 207); Shevet ...


7

The Mishna Berura (471:12) brings that the custom is not to eat Matzah from Rosh Chodesh. One of the sources he brings in the Shaar HaTzion is the Chok Yaakov. The relevant Chok Yaakov is here. There (471:7), he quotes Sharei Knesset Hagedola brought in this answer. Interestingly, he quotes it as saying from "Rosh Hashanah", which I'm assuming in this case ...


7

Chametz is prohibited to eat or own on Passover, and this includes any flour made of the five grains that has come into contact with water for enough time to halachically ferment, which is a period of at least 18 minutes. Se'or, which is the heavily-leavened sourdough that was commonly used as a leavening agent, is also prohibitted to eat or own on ...


7

The Halacha is fairly clear about how to treat various categories of grain product: Bread Grain products that aren't at all bread (e.g. pasta) Quasi-bread not usually treated as bread What's far less clear is exactly what fits into which category. If, for instance, you consider cheerios to be #3, then you'd have to wash, make hamotzi, and bench on ...


7

its probably too late for this year, but basically you call up a factory (theres one in lakewood and 5-6 in NYC) and ask when you can come. usually people go in groups, so if you go by yourself theyd probably lump you with another group. or if you have enough people (5 will do) you can go with them and create your own group. warning though that because the ...


7

Good question. The same question comes up with all the blessings regarding a second-day yom tov on the Diaspora; e.g. kiddush and shehechiyanu on the second night of Sukkot, Shavuot, and Shmini Atzeret. Until the Jewish calendar was fixed in place (around the year 500 or so), those in the Diaspora were keeping two days, going "maybe yom tov is really ...


7

According to the Bedatz of Crown Heights, It is told that the [Lubavitcher] Rebbe's household was accustomed to to eat gebrochts in the form of kneidlach on the final day of Pesach - regardless of whether the final day coincided with Shabbos. Naturally such foods can be prepared only if one had made an Eiruv Tavshilin.


6

There's a similar case discussed if you forget e.g. yaleh v'yavo by mincha and only remember after nightfall. You repeat shemoneh esrei even though you don't say over yaleh v'yavo. It seems like it doesn't accomplish anything, but at least that shemoneh esrei was done correctly. So perhaps here too, the eating would be correct even though not leaning. Though ...


6

The reason for this custom is the suspicion that some flour remains uncooked in the matzah, and by water then touching it, allows for the opportunity of becoming chametz. Matzah with water, or certain other liquids, is called "gebrochts" in Yiddish, and people who follow the custom to refrain from eating it are often said to "observe gebrochts" or "keep ...


6

There are many explanations, meanings and innuendos. Here are a few: Avraham served the Angles-disguised-as-men three loaves when they arrived at his home. That was on Pesach. We compare the Matzah to "poor man's bread" an a poor man always puts some away for later, hence the "break and hide" routine of the middle matzah. Plus, hiding a piece of Matzah ...


6

From "The Historical Haggada," by R' Nachman Cohen (p. 14): Of the three matzot on the table, why is it that the middlte matza is the one which is broken? The halakhic answer is: On Pesach three matzot are required. One for lechem o'ni (poor man's bread) and two for lechem mishna (the two loaves required on each Shabbat and Yom Tov). Since it is ...


6

It's interesting that another answer mentions the Alter Rebbe's answer as the origin, but fails to clearly explain the history of how/why this minhag suddenly started. Why isn't this minhag / worry mentioned by any of the poskim ?? Here is an excerpt of the Alter Rebbe's answer: ומה שלא הזכירו זה בפוסקים, היינו משום שזה אינו מצוי כלל אלא בעיסה קשה ...


5

In OC 471 sk 12, the Mishna Berurah mentions that certain types of matza which we are only machmir to treat as chametz (eg matza that folded over itself in the oven) are forbidden to be eaten on Erev Pesach as they are actually kosher matza according to the basic law. The assumption of this point is that had they actually been chametz, they would have been ...


5

In Holland, round matzot were made before the Shoa; the only matze available is made by the matza factory de Haan, Valkenburgerstraat, Amsterdam and Hollandia Matza in Enschede. After the Shoa until today, you can buy round machine matzot from Hollandia matzes.


5

Maybe because there is no independent Mitzva to eat Matzo on Pesach Sheni. One eats matzo only to accompany the Pesach, identical to the mitzva of Maror. Whereas on Pesach Rishon, there is an independent mitzva to eat matzo, besides the requirement for it to accompany the consumption of Pesach.


5

As per Otzar Minhagei Chabad, which in turn quotes from R' Leibel Groner (the Lubavitcher Rebbe's personal secretary): The context here is discussing the fact that while throughout pesach Chabad does not eat gebrochts (matza shruyah), on the eighth and last day of Pesach, they make a point to davka eat it. Quick translation: When the last day of ...


5

The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains in his Haggada (Likkutey Taamim Uminhagim): The verse regarding the original Korban Pesach (Shemos 12:8) - "ואכלו את הבשר גו' ומצות על מרורים יאכלוהו" (They shall eat the flesh, roasted over the fire, and unleavened cakes; with bitter herbs they shall eat it) would seem to come as a counter-proof to Hillel's opinion that one ...


5

To quote myself: The Mishna Berura (OC 471 sk 10) points out that one may eat Matza Ashira (eg. Egg Matza) on Erev Pesach because one cannot fulfill his obligation to eat matza on seder night with it. Seemingly the only things that are forbidden to eat are those with which one can fulfill his obligation to eat matza.


4

Reb Moshe Feinstein used two Matzaos as per Minhag HaGra brought down in both of these Haggadas Artscroll Vayaged Moshe Haggadah and the Reb Moshe Haggadah



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