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9

Rashi Shavuos 2b - a bit more than halfway down says that Stam Rabbi Shimon is Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai Rashbam Bava Basra 102a - towards the bottom of the page also says that Stam Rabbi Shimon is Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai


6

If you read further in the Gemara Bava Kama 74b you see that although he blinded him he did not go free as there were no witnesses.


6

The Rambam (Hil. Avel, 4:4) presents this custom as halacha, and he is followed by many other rishonim including the Rokeach (Hil. Aveilus, 313), Sefer HaAgudah (B'rachos, Chapter 9), Kol Bo (§ 114), and the Ramban (Toras HaAdam, Sha'ar HaSof, Inyan HaHotza'ah). This custom is also presented by such later authorities as the Beit Yosef (YD 376) and, more ...


6

First of all, what you say is not exactly true. It might be the case that every English translation that you have seen understands the word to mean morning - and most probably because it is preceded by the verb "to rise" - but there are Hebrew commentaries that understand it in line with this gemara. Both the Radak and the Metzudat Tziyon understand the word ...


6

In verse (Melachim 2:8), King David tells Shlomo: וְהִנֵּה עִמְּךָ שִׁמְעִי בֶן-גֵּרָא בֶן-הַיְמִינִי, מִבַּחֻרִים In the Zohar Mishpatim (דף קז עמוד ב): כתיב והנה עמך שמעי בן גרא, מאי והנה עמך, זמין הוא עמך תדיר, רבו הוה, ... אבל שמעי דא דאשתכח עמיה תדיר, אמר והנה עמך.‏ Translation - the Zohar learns from the verse "with you" to mean that he ...


6

The gemara there also recounts the story of an Amora who specifically stood up in order to show that he was not following the position of Beis Shammai. The Bach in hilchos krias shema (Orech Chaim 63), cited by the mishna berura (same place), rules that one should be careful not to sit down just before shema in order to not give the impression that he is ...


5

No source on this, but my thought is that the gemara is trying to say that since vayehi erev, vayehi boker, we should start all things with night first.


5

See the Q&A cited in yydl's answer to a related question: Rashi to Berachos there says that it was a piece less than the size of a barleycorn, which isn't subject to tum'ah and therefore doesn't require burial. Aruch, and Rashbam to Bava Basra 116a (both cited in Mesores Hashas to Berachos there) explain that it was a tooth, which according to many ...


5

This post, on the Avodah list, cites Kol Mevasser (1:76)* who asks for Kesef Mishneh's source, as well as the related question of how David could have been a member of the Sanhedrin anyway (whether as its head or not). This sefer suggests, like DoubleAA in his comment above, that David may have been the nasi, a position which he says can indeed be filled ...


5

The full text of the relevant piece follows. I have put statements of R Chanina in bold, and statements of the gemara-narrator/stama in italics. אמר רבי חנינא הכל בידי שמים חוץ מיראת שמים שנאמר ועתה ישראל מה ה' אלהיך שואל מעמך כי אם ליראה אטו יראת שמים מילתא זוטרתא היא והא"ר חנינא משום ר' שמעון בן יוחי אין לו להקב"ה בבית גנזיו אלא אוצר של יראת שמים שנאמר ...


5

Rashi in Pesachim 56a writes that Sefer HaRefuos was hidden because their hearts were not humbled over their illness but were, rather, healed immediately. Rambam in Peirush Hamishna (Pesachim 4:10) rejects this approach arguing that just as one may not hold back food from the hungry, so too one may not withhold healing from the ill. Instead, Rambam writes ...


4

In Halichos Mordechai, The Traveler's Companion, by Rabbi Eliezer Wanger, he says, quoting R' Avraham Chaim Na'ah (K'zot HaShulchan 65 and Badei HaShulchan 2): One does not say Birkas Gomeil if he traveled through a desert by train (footnote -- because on a train one is not worried about wild animals and bandits). However, in footnote 14 he says says: ...


4

The Ben Yehoyada interprets the whole thing as a metaphor: The heart is like metal. If the heart is full of fear, which comes from the element of fire*, a "hammer" is able to affect it (it's well-known that hammers are used in welding). So this doesn't literally mean to hit him with a hammer. This "hammer" is really something that "moves the ashes" of a ...


4

I have heard in the name of Rabbi Nachman M'Breslov that חדה (Chada) is Roshei Teivos חולאים (illnesses), דמים (money), and הריון (pregnancy). Even if one is very ill, or lacking money, or having a difficult time conceiving they should never give up.


4

This is a Mishnah in Berachos (Perek 1:4) The Brachos are as follows: Morning Shema: The first Bracha starts with "Baruch ata...Yotzer Ohr Uvoreh Chosech..." and ends with "Baruch ata...Yotzer Hameorot" (at the end of "es shem") The Second Bracha Starts with "Ahavas olam ahavtanu..." I believe the exact wording may vary by Nusach, and ends with "Baruch ...


4

The word "חַטָּאִים‏" (with a Patach under the Chet and a Dagesh Chazak in the Tet) means sinners. See for example Tehillim 25:8. The word "חֲטָאִים‏" (with a Chataf-Patach under the Chet) means sins. See for example Kohelet 10:4. Without punctuation the word can be read both ways. Bruria is telling R' Meir that praying for them to die is not ...


4

The first פני יהושע in Keitzad Mevarchim discusses this question. His suggestion is that the Mishna is only listing berachos that include a lot of different species, to contrast with R' Yehuda who is brought at the end of the Mishna and says each species needs its own specific blessing. According to Tosefos in the discussion of kimcha d'chiti on berachos ...


4

There are two separate angles the two sources wish to respectively address. Avot intends to list possible degrees of Divine presence, nothing more. The Talmud wishes to detail specific differences in each group, independent of the degree of presence this is why here there is more detail and the number five is missing. First, one who learns Torah, Shechinah ...


3

According to this article by Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, Rav Soloveitchik explained the special nature of bread as relating to the degree of human involvement required to turn G-d's creation (stalks of wheat) into edible bread. Rav Soloveitchik explained as follows: Concerning the Seven Species, the partnership between G-d and humans is limited, with the ...


3

The Tiferes Yisroel suggests that the mikvaos were outside the town (to avoid problems of mayim sheuvim). The Kohanim went to mikvah near to sunset to avoid having to be careful about their ritual purity during the day and so after their teviloh and drying themselves they did not come into town until it was dark. So he understands that that the kohanim ...


3

From the words of the Malbim on Shas it would be an extention of the Torah law of keeping oneself out of danger. Again from the same Malbim: Because the "chain" must not be broken until they conclude Talmud Bavli. a. According to the Rambam, yes; according to Rashi (quoted in Lechem Mishne), only if there are Yeshivos. b. According to (above) Malbim, ...


3

The Bavli on Sota 39b says that one should respond - and the wording there is almost identical to the Yerushalmi: בזמן שהכהנים מברכים את העם מה הן אומרים אמר ר' זירא אמר רב חסדא ברכו ה' מלאכיו גבורי כח וגו' ברכו ה' כל צבאיו משרתיו עושי רצונו ברכו ה' כל מעשיו בכל מקומות ממשלתו ברכי נפשי את ה' במוספי דשבתא מה הן אומרים אמר רבי אסי שיר המעלות הנה ברכו את ה' ...


3

The Magen Avhraham (119:1) quoting Maharil explains that only when in the presence of the sick person may the name of the sick person be omitted. Otherwise, the name should be mentioned. The Gemara Berachos is where Moshe Rabenu was in Miriam's presence. The Gemara Taanis is when the prayers were not made near the sick person.


3

As Rashi explains in ברכות on 10b and in פסחים on 56a: שגנז ספר רפואות לפי שלא היה לבם נכנע על חולים אלא מתרפאין מיד People would not take the illness as a stimulus to do Teshuva, rather they would immediately look up the cure - and lose the divinely-sent lesson of the illness.


3

NOTE: both of these are only partial answers; the 1st may be against the Rashba and the 2nd is disputed First Answer The simplest answer might be that the times of getting up and going to sleep are based on when non-Jews, who are exempt from Shema, wake up (after all, non-Jews do make up the vast majority of the human population). Rishonim (see Tos. 2b) ...


2

In Halachic discussions it is taken as axiomatic that the authors of the mishnayos and baraysos did not generally embellish and say things that were not pertinent. Therefore, if a tanna gives three reasons for something, it is assumed that each of the three reasons has independent application; that each reason has some application that could not have been ...


2

In the second mishnah of Brachos, there are two opinions as to what the latest time for Shema is: Rabbi Eliezer says sunrise, and Rabbi Yehoshua says it's three hours, because princes get up at three hours, so it can still be called "And when you get up" which is the time of the Shema in the morning. The Rashba asked: If it is the practice for princes to ...


2

I don't believe there is proof from this story that one who damages someone to prevent them from doing an aveira is not obligated to pay for damages. R' Ada bar Ahava was likely a dayan who was qualified (according to the rules set forth in Sanhedrin 5a) to judge cases on his own. The courts have many powers that individuals do not, such as using certain ...


2

The Maharatz Chajes discusses this in Maamar Torat Nevi'im, ch. 7: וכן ניחא נמי ליישב הא דלא מנו מוני המצות מה שאמרו חז"ל (כתובות קי"א ע"א) העולה מבבל לא"י עובר בעשה שנאמר בבלה יובאו ושמה יהיו עד יום פקדי אותם, והיינו דמצוה זאת היא היפך ממצות התורה שנצטוינו בשעת מתן תורה לרשת את הארץ ולהאחז בה, ואם לא היינו חוטאים היתה עדיין א"י מוחזקת אצלנו, וע"כ מצוה זאת ...


2

While you quoted a Gemara which interprets a Braisa as saying that Maariv is mandatory, another Gemara interprets a mishna that it's optional. The Gemara Brachos 27b says that it's an argument between R' Yehoshua and R' Gamliel. Abaye says that the Halacha follows R' Gamliel (who says that it's mandatory) and Rava says that the Halacha follows R' Yehoshua ...



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