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12

Stuff that grows by itself on public property is exempt from the rules of orla. Source: Radvaz's commentary to Rambam, Maaser Sheni 10:6 (though it's pretty clear from the Rambam himself, 10:5).


10

Mesechtas Shabbos 3a Shmuel says that every time it says Patur (exempt) by the laws of Shabbos it means Patur Avol Assur (exempt [from Korban/death], but still forbidden [rabbinically]) besides for 3 cases which are listed there. Rashi explains that means that it is 100% not permitted M'Drabanan. The carrying Gemara in the question says Patur.


8

Here is what I could dig up about him: He lived sometime in the (late) second century. This is evident from Shabbos 23b which places him at the same time as Rav Huna who passed away in 296 (wikipedia). He had two children named Rav Iddi and Rav Chiya (Gemora there). He lived in Bavel as is evident from the story with Rav Huna. Rav Huna began lecturing in ...


8

Another answer (suggested here in the Sefer "Kerem Efraim") is that because the tree was created through a miracle, it was not obligated in Orlah. He brings support from the Radak (Malachim Beis 100:4) who writes that the oil that was miraculously created for the wife of Ovadia did not require Maaser to be separated from it. He explains that for the first ...


8

I heard once in a recording from R. Y.S. Schorr that Shamai represented a middas hadin, an exacting attitude of strict justice (as is evidenced by those very stories). His measuring stick was a display of just that point - everything had to be measured and exactly according to what was deserved.


7

It is clear that angels have jealousy towards humans from Tosfiyos Brachos 3a that says that some say that we say certain prayers in Aramaic in order that the angels should not be jealous of us, and Tosfiyos does not say there is no jealousy, only that we say other prayers in Lashon Kodesh so that can not be the reason. Also Rashi Braishis 1:26 indicates ...


7

Aruch HaShulchan 265:12 & 265:13 discusses this. From what I understand the Gemara is talking about placing a bowl of water under the candle where it would be prohibited even from Erev Shabbos, however oil with water in a glass is no issue. Orach Chaim 265:4 says that so long one has no intention that it is being done to extinguish the flame sooner it ...


7

We do have indications that #1 could have happened. Doros Harishonim (vol. 3, pp. 139ff) understands Josephus (Wars 7:6:6) to be saying that after the destruction of the second Beis Hamikdash, Vespasian nationalized all property belonging to victims of the war who had left no known heirs. (He also cites Eusebius (4:8 - should be 4:6:1) as saying that the ...


7

Indeed, the Beit Yosef (OC 36) cites the Gemara you reference and claims that the ש should have a pointed base. The Peri Megadim (EA end of 32) is unsure if this is a necessary component of the letter. The Keset HaSofer (5:2:ש) implies it would be Kosher Bedieved, but one should be very careful to avoid a flat base. The Mishna Berura (Mishnat Sofrim ש) is ...


7

There is a book called שער הכולל that aims to explain the choices made in that version of the siddur. The author notes the following in regard to the phrase ובין איש לאשתו (chapter 1, paragraph 19): במשנה שלפנינו לא נמצאו התיבת הללו אבל בסדר היום ובשער השמים משל״ה מביאים הלשון הזה גם בתד״א פי״ג לענין אהרן הכהן מביא זה הלשון בין אדם לחבירו ובין איש ...


6

There are numerous Talmudic sources which refer to a "Golden Jerusalem", these sources, however, are not referring to the actual city of Jerusalem but to a piece of jewelry which was colloquially referred to as "Golden Jerusalem" or "Golden City". It was probably a tiara which was engraved to resemble a city skyline. That being said, the song Yerushalyim ...


6

If you read the second verse again you will see that it is saying the opposite of your understanding that you write in your question. It says that you should answer a fool (in matters of Torah), lest he be wise in his own eyes - if you do not answer him he will think that his opinion is wise. But in mundane matters we don't care what he thinks and feels, and ...


5

Excellent question! Of course Hashem is everywhere. In some times and places, we perceive His presence more strongly. In those instances, we say that the Shechinah is present. An analogy for this concept is radio waves. They're (pretty much) everywhere, but we can only "tune into" them when we have a receiver (i.e. a radio). Sorry - I don't remember the ...


5

The simplest explanation is the one found in the Gemara -- the section of the Talmud with a nice discussion of what materials make for good oils and wicks is found in Shabbos (vis-a-vis shabbos candles), so it segways from there into what materials to use for Chanukah lighting. Perhaps a bit deeper, shabbos candles are known as "the home's lights" (ner ...


5

R. Guttentag in his sefer Tal Oros Vol.1 here in his in-depth essay about Beis Hillel and Beis Shammai explains that the students of Beis Shammai in this story refer to some of the young hotheads who suspected that the opinion of the students of Beis Hillel came from a corrupt Torah outlook, and thus considered them rebels against the Torah and so they ...


5

Rabbi S.R. Hirsch writes that the story cannot be understood like this, because then the vote would be meaningless. He explains that Beis Hillel had been refusing a formal vote, and Beis Shammai on that day gathered outside the building and forcefully prevented Beis Hillel from leaving until a vote was held. Beis Hillel were the majority, but Beis Shammai ...


5

The Chassam Sofer says that Shammai was actually a builder by trade. He wanted to show this apikores that there is more to religion than just kindness to your fellow, its possible to be a talmid chacham and a builder. Whereas Hillel said that you can learn on one foot, i.e. kindness, but don't forget that includes kindness to Hashem which means keeping His ...


4

Rav Moshe Feinstein forbade it (IgM, OC 3, 47).


4

I don't know how these words are said, I'm guessing the vowelization is גַרְעִינִין or גַרְעֵינִין or maybe גַרְעֵינְיָן? Either way, unless you're trying to be particularly makpid on pronunciation, ayin-tsere-malei or ayin-hirik-malei sound a lot like their aleph-based counterparts. Languages also tend to be forgiving when there's no easily-confusable ...


4

Perhaps these words that Chazal are asking about were not words used on a daily basis and therefore it was unclear how to pronounce them.


4

On your way, you may suddenly realize that you have something in your pocket. At that point, it would certainly be assur to continue to carry it. Checking your pockets prevents you from being in this situation so it is not a gezeira legezeira.


4

Perhaps Shabbat 156a-b? The phrase also appears once in Nedarim 32a.


4

Based on that Gemara it appears that there are two opinions regarding whether King David erred or not. According to the opinion that he did err, this shortcoming was the cause of the split in the kingdom and the ultimate exile while according to the opinion that he did not err the split in the kingdom must be attributed to some other cause. Based on Kings ...


4

In the same sugya in the gemara Beitzah 16a, Rashi explains: "He should inform his mother" - he should make for him (the child) a sign so that if he eats it (the food) before he comes to his mother, she will see the sign and ask him "Who did this to you?", and he will answer "It was so-and-so, and he also gave me some bread", and through this his father ...


4

I recently saw a mashal that applies. I was unable to find it so this is from memory. A rabbi had been in a major community for many years and was getting old. He wanted to go to a smaller community so as not to be under as much pressure and to have time to learn. The smaller community was of course delighted. He carefully arranged with his current ...


4

Tosfos answer, because a miracle occurred for the sake of his wearing tefillin. Only if he were wearing tefillin properly, i.e. with a clean body, would he merit such a miracle.


4

Refer to the Mishnah in Pesachim 115a. According to one reading, it states that "On all other nights we are not REQUIRED to dip even once". This was the original text of that question, since, indeed, dipping was common during the time of the Gemarah. Years later (I don't know when), when dipping was not common, the text of this question changed.


3

The Meshech Chochma on parshat Bechukotai explains the difference between zchut avot and brit avot as follows. If one invests in his friend's business and subsequently sees his friend's children carrying on the business in the same good way as the father he will be inclined to continue investing in the business as he sees the same positive qualities that ...


3

The sefer תולדות תנאים ואמורים here writes that every Rosh Yeshiva had one or more "Tannaim", even in the latter period of the Amoraim, whose job it was to be the resident expert in all the Baraissos (Tannaic teachings) by heart, so that whenever a Baraissa (which were generally learned by heart) was needed he was like a living book and would be able to ...


3

Somebody just drew a beraita to my attention (Shabbat 107b), which I think might answer my question. In a discussion that concerns whether or not lice spontaneously generate, Rabbi Eliezer's opinion is brought to the effect that one who kills a louse on Shabbat is as liable as had he killed a camel. Rabbi Yehoshua disagrees, saying that one is permitted to ...



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