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11

Rabbi Avraham Chayim Schorr (Toras Chayim to Sanhedrin 90a) addresses this question and concludes that this refers to people who would merit immediate admission to olam haba without any prior suffering of the soul.1 R' Tzadok of Lublin (P'ri Tzadik, Vayikra, Lag Ba'Omer V'siyum HaShas, §3) provides an alternative explanation. He says that all of Israel is ...


9

Me'iri explains that they go directly to Gehenom. According the Rambam Ramban, after death you either go to Gan Eden or Gehenom. At the time of the final judgment it is decided if you go to Olam Haba, these people do not stop for judgment but remain in Gehenom so as not to increase their punishment. Yad Ramah's explanation is similar to the Ramban but says ...


5

The Talmud in tractate Sanhedrin (Yerushalmi 7:4 Bavli 52b) asks this question. Two answers are given: 1) Rav Yoshiya: Since it is unspecified, it must be the easiest (קל) of deaths. (The Bavli explains this means the easiest of the four deaths known through tradition, following the opinion of the Sages (Mishna Sanhedrin 7:1) that strangulation is the ...


5

I don't understand the question. The statement that a person who saves one life, saves the world is an aggadic statement, not a halachic one. Halacha does not allow you to sacrifice one life for the sake of many. If you save a life, that is a great and wonderful thing. If you think you are saving a life, but don't actually do so, it doesn't take away the ...


4

I had understood this Mishna to be speaking of an actual physical life, so unless you murdered somebody c'v... There are surely other understandings, and maybe somebody more versed in the commentaries will bring one. As to your other question, Judaism teaches that you can always repent, no matter what. Rebbe Nachman of Breslev zy'a stated this principle ...


4

In the Avi Ezri on Hilkhot Avodah Zarah 4:2, R. Schach asks why the Rambam interprets the gemara as referring to the number of sinners, when this requirement is about the size of the city--to become an עיר הנדחת, the city cannot be a כפר or a כרך. What does this have to do with the number of people who sinned? He quotes the Minchat Chinukh (no. 464) and ...


4

Quoting from here, #7: There is a general prohibition of "eating a limb from a live animal" (ever min hachai), which logically should also include milk, the product of a live animal. Ever min hachai is actually one of the Seven Noahide Laws which the Jews observed prior to Sinai (and which has applied to all humanity since the days of Noah). ...


3

With respect to what constitutes destroying a soul: Primarily it is referring to taking a life. There are other meanings, especially in the reverse (rescuing a soul), that refer to spiritual matters, but these are things having to do with one's spiritual growth and development. If you act as a mentor to someone who seems lost and wandering in life and ...


3

It would seem from the order of the Rambam in הלכות סנהדרין והעונשין המסורים להם, that only the 4 capital punishments are included. The Rambam includes the force-feeding-execution in Ch. 18 along with the laws of lashes. ד מִי שֶׁלָּקָה בְּבֵית דִּין עַל אִסּוּר כָּרֵת וְלָקָה פַּעַם שְׁנִיָּה עַל אוֹתוֹ כָּרֵת עַצְמוֹ כְּגוֹן שֶׁאָכַל חֵלֶב וְלָקָה ...


3

This means that all of the prophecies concerning Mashiach and how great things will be in his generation were already 'consumed' in the time of Chizkiyahu; that those prophecies were already used up and enjoyed. Examples abound (see this dictionary which gives 'use up' as a definition for אכל), many involving fire's consumption: see Shemot 3:2 וְהִנֵּה ...


3

To the first point: "Achluhu" means, consumed rather than merely eaten. In this context it means that the Moshiach was consumed, used up, in the days of Chizkiyahu. To the second: One other example is Shemot 24:17 - וּמַרְאֵה כְּבוֹד יְהוָה, כְּאֵשׁ אֹכֶלֶת בְּרֹאשׁ הָהָר, לְעֵינֵי, בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל. The term eish ochelet comes from the same root word ...


3

The Rambam explains, in line with his explanation of what Kares is, that they are cut off from their own spiritual component, and they remain physical. When the physical world comes to an end (as it will, in the Rambam's world), these people will end with it. They have no connection to spirituality, as they have chosen to involve themselves and invest in ...


3

1) Wikipedia says Nahmanides identifies the Sambation with the Guzana River mentioned in II Kings, located in Medes. 2)Ba'al Ov involves a process of bringing the Dead to speak with a live person. For more info see this link. 3) A quick google search reveals no known burial place for Tornosrufus. As far as I know we have no Mesorah where he is buried to go ...


3

The Maharsha answers that first they stoned him a little then they put a little wick in his mouth again not to the extent of death, they choked him almost until death and finally they chopped off his head killing him, thereby getting a bit of all the Deaths of Beis Din. The Shevus Yackov has a more an interesting answer. He claims is that Billam with his ...


2

It seems that y'shal'mena necessitates a monetary interpretation, whereas v'nasata is vague enough that the Tanna Kamma followed the more apparent meaning.


2

the rambam says in hilchos melachim that we cannot know the correct interpretation of all these things until it happens. we can also see this from the exodus of egypt which was supposed to be 400 years but with built in leeway of interpretation and wound up being counted from the birth of Isaac because the jews were not able to handle more. i think this is ...


2

The same daf in Sanhedrin 97 a few lines down basically answer the question. see what R'Shmuel Bar Nachamani says about those who calculate the arrival of mashiach ,he uses the loshon of tifach and writes people lose emunah because of it.He seems to disagree with the Rabbaniom who made calculations. A few more lines down Rav writes all the ...


2

Every king is obligated to write his own Sefer Torah. See Chinuch Mitzvah 503 The obligation only starts once the King becomes King. Any Sefer Torah written prior to that cannot be used to fulfill this Mitzvah. I'm pretty sure that is what the Mishna is indicating with the word "LeShmo". The Sefer Torah the King writes should be his Sefer Torah, which he ...


2

My guess is that the drasha of "בן ולא בת, בן ולא איש" was a known drasha that the mishna here is incorporating to support it's statement about the age of the ben sorrer u'moreh. Although the fact about "בן ולא בת" is not relevant to the discussion of the mishna, it includes the full statement as it was known. To give a more famous example, in the gemara ...


2

Not unlike Yom Tov, Melacha is forbidden on Chol Hamoed with certain exceptions. The opening line of the Shulchan Aruch's discussing these laws is (Shulchan Aruch OC 530): חול המועד אסור בקצת מלאכות ומותר במקצתן Chol Hamoed is forbidden in some labors and permitted in some of them. Violating these Melachot would constitute violating Chol Hamoed.


1

I think you are reffering to the gemara in בכורות ו׳ ע׳ב. There, the gemara is discussing a certain different limud according to one opinion and in order to understand his logic proposes a הוה אמינה that חלב כי אבר מן החי. The use of the word כי and the fact that this is never mentioned as actually being אבר מן החי anywhere would mean that it is in fact ...


1

Sanhedrin 21 has the halachos of a king. I did not see a reference to matan torah and milk in it. I checked other sources and the reference is to Bechoros 6b (ArtScroll 6b2 notes 24, 25, and 27) Part of the reasoning as to why Avraham could serve milk is based on an implication that milk was not considered eiver min hachai (for Ben Noach) that seems to be ...


1

The Talmud doesn't say that R' Beroka and Elijah traversed the entire market place looking for those that merited the hereafter. Indeed it seems that the question was posed in a milling crowd of people, as Elijah at first says no, and then notices the Jailor, who is hurrying by as R' Beroka must run to catch him. A similar situation occurs with the Jesters, ...


1

Perhaps he is quoting material that is not from the Bavli where one version appeared, but rather extra-Talmud Bavli material like the Yerushalmi, Tosefta, The Pesiqtas, or other random midrashim, where stories can vary sometimes from their Bavli counterpart.


1

If you look carefully at the Gemara it doesn't really say that. מאי בבל א"ר יוחנן בלולה במקרא בלולה במשנה בלולה בתלמוד במחשכים הושיבני כמתי עולם אמר ר' ירמיה זה תלמודה של בבל R. Yochanan is talking about Babylon, or more specifically the Torah scholars there. There doesn't seem to be an indication that he is referring to the Babylonian Talmud. R. ...



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