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7

The Talmud (Shabbat 91a) discusses the minimum measurement of food that must be carried between domains on Shabbat in order to be obligated in punishment. The minimum shiur depends on what the intended use of the object is. A kegrogeret (the size of a dried fig, which is greater than or equal to a kezayit) is the minimum amount of food when the food is ...


5

The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains in his Haggada (Likkutey Taamim Uminhagim): The verse regarding the original Korban Pesach (Shemos 12:8) - "ואכלו את הבשר גו' ומצות על מרורים יאכלוהו" (They shall eat the flesh, roasted over the fire, and unleavened cakes; with bitter herbs they shall eat it) would seem to come as a counter-proof to Hillel's opinion that one ...


5

The Mishna (Pesachim 39a) lists five types of plants which are considered marror. They are: Chazeres Ulshin Tamcha Charchavina Marror. Although various opinions have been offered to define these five species, we only use those those species which are known by tradition to be marror. The first, Chazeres, is defined as Chasa which is commonly ...


4

It seems clear from Pesachim 39a that Chazeres (lettuce) is preffered for Maror. Several reasons are given. because both the Mishna and the Braisa of Shmuel's academy mention it first. R' Oshaya paskens that chazeres is preffered for the Mitzva. Rava, citing the similarity between the word lettuce (Chas) and pity (chasa) that The Merciful One took pity on ...


4

Well, here are the pros and cons as I see them: Iceberg lettuce: PROS: It's easy to find at any supermarket and cheap. As far as bugs go, take off the 3 outermost leaves, quarter it, rinse it, and you're done. No bug-checking required. (The bug-checking thing can be heard from Rabbi Genack here.) It's said that R' Yaakov Kaminetsky's usual Marror was ...


4

There is a כלל in the Talmud, כל הראוי לבילה, בילה מעכבת בו, כל שאין ראוי לבילה, בילה מעכבת בו. I.e. if there is an action required to be done (as part of a chain of actions), as long as one is able to do so, one does not need to actually do it. But if it cannot be done, the entire chain of actions is invalidated. The Gemara above speaks of a קרבן מנחה, ...


4

The Chabad custom (Sefer Haminhagim Chabad, Haggada im Likkutey Tammim Uminhagim, see also Aruch Hashulchan 473:14) is to use a combination of ground horseradish and Romaine lettuce. We put the ground horseradish inside the lettuce and dip that into the charoses. Shulchan Aruch (473:5) rules that one may combine the different types of Maror, and this custom ...


3

Rambam Hilchos Chanuka 3:5: ולמה מברכין על יום טוב שני, והם לא תיקנוהו אלא מפני הספק--כדי שלא יזלזלו בו. Why do we make a blessing on the second day of Yom Tov, as it was only established as a safek? In order that people do not come to disrespect the day If Yom Tov sheni was dealt with differently, in ways that treat it on a lower level due to ...


3

No, it can not be used because if it's in vinegar for longer than 24 hours it's considered cooked. And even less than that is not good since the surface is "cooked". Buy Mason Jars - they are airtight and excellent for this. Walmart/Target/etc sell them by the case and they are pretty cheap - about $1 per jar.


3

Shaar Hakollel (48:11) says that indeed some people, because of this difference in terminology, do use different species for each one. Their rationale, he says, is that they're not sure which are the five species listed in the Mishnah (Pesachim 39a), so they prefer to use an actual bitter vegetable (horseradish, I guess) for maror, and then lettuce for ...


2

Since 2-3 years ago when there was some whole supposed problem with the Romaine I have not seen anywhere the Dole / Fresh Express romaine with a Star-k. However I was in Queens this past week in Aron's Kissena Farms and they had Dole Romaine Lettuce with a Star-k.


2

I can't quite answer your question, but this could get you started: A. Depending on how you translate the items listed in the Mishna and Gemara there, they may all be members of the composite/lettuce/daisy family. (The one that stands out like a sore thumb is horseradish, which Rabbi Hershel Welcher admitted does not fit according to modern-day analysis of ...


1

We use unground horseradish. If you can't handle the gases in it, let it sit out for a few hours. Or wrap it in foil right after cutting for the full effect. We also use romain lettuce bases (not the leaf, the base of the plant) for those who don't want the horseradish (or as a supplement for those who can't eat a ke-zait of it).


1

The other vegetable is probably the one used for karpas, if I understand the Ramba"m in Hilchos chametz umatza 8:1,2 correctly. It is clear from the g'mara on which these halachos are based (P'sachim 114b) and Tosafos (ad loc.) that chazeres (i.e. some type of lettuce) is the assumed species of maror and a suitable species of karpas as well.


1

I know this doesn't answer your particular question, but I've seen at WalMart (here in St. Louis, for what it's worth) a store brand of bagged lettuce with the K-ORC from San Francisco, which I don't know anything about. It may be worth looking into the K-ORC and calling WalMart.


1

When one eats the marror, he is obligated to dip it into charoses and then to shake off the charoses before eating it. If the charoses remains on the marror, it would give off its sweet taste to the marror that is supposed to be bitter (Shulchan Aruch 475:1). When one eats the korech, the Shulchan Aruch (ibid.) rules that one must follow the same ...



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