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1

Well if she's around Jews and uncovered hair is treated as ervah, then she'd be stopping any nearby Jews from praying or saying any brachos. Generally it's assumed that the obligation of married women to cover is independent of the ervah status, so no it wouldn't make a difference. The Gemara in Kesubos describes the prohibition as being "in public", and ...


0

It's only a precautionary marriage which is unlikely to actually continue and, in the unlikely event it did continue but didn't work out, they could always get a divorce. They also likely had a very different cultural expectation from marriage back then that didn't require the same level of agonizing. Finally, it sounds a lot like the gemara a few dapim ...


1

There's an mp3 where Rabbi Aaron Rakeffet-Rothkoff mentions his personal opinion that because the Torah identifies families by the father's name (lemishpechotam l'veit avotam), his preference is for a married woman to take her husband's name. He's fine with hyphenation if the maiden name is helpful for professional purposes. (Rakeffet himself had first ...


9

The general answer is no it is not acceptable. Marrying and having children is a personal obligation of every Jewish man. Even if a man has the required number of children, or is unable to have children, in Judaism it is still required to get married (to avoid other sins of a sexual nature). (Shulchan Aruch Even HaEzer 1:1 and 1:8) However, there is one ...


-1

since in jewish view as seen in rambam and more, that women should respect there husband like a king etc. it may be disrespectfull keeping maiden name.



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