Hot answers tagged

13

In the Tzavaos of Rabbi Yehuda HaChasid #25 seen here he says two brothers should not marry two sisters. See note #37 (#32 in the linked edition) from Rabbi Reuven Margolis quoting the Noda Biyehuda Even HaEzer 79 who brings cases in the gemara where we see this was not something they adhered to. EDIT: To clarify the issue and for those who don't know, ...


12

There isn't a contradiction here. The sources are talking about two things: [1] A woman's right to conjugal relations/sexual fulfillment/attention and her husband's duty to be available to her sexually. The halakhah limits his duty to within reason - and reason dictates that independently wealthy men need to be available to their wives daily if need be, as ...


9

The general answer is no it is not acceptable. Marrying and having children is a personal obligation of every Jewish man. Even if a man has the required number of children, or is unable to have children, in Judaism it is still required to get married (to avoid other sins of a sexual nature). (Shulchan Aruch Even HaEzer 1:1 and 1:8) However, there is one ...


9

Halochos Gedolos - Halachos Arayos brings that this question was asked by Yosi ben Tadai Ish Teveria to Rabbi Gamliel. Rabbi Gamliel answered him that it would be impossible for a Kohain Gadol to ever get married. The Mishne Halachos there explains that by the same logic a Kohain Gadol would be unable to marry anyone's daughter, as every woman with a ...


8

Tzitz Eliezer 14:73 spells this one out very explicitly: it's identical for sons and daughters -- the parents can't force them to marry or not-marry someone if they don't want to. (Though he adds that it's usually the right thing to do for both sons and daughters to ask their parents' advice or otherwise involve them somehow.) There is one responsum of ...


7

My translation: In these days, for many reasons (including also - reasons of Yiras Shamayim [דיר"ש = דיראת שמים]) it is not a desirable thing to commit oneself and how much more so [ועאכו"כ = ועל אחת כמה וכמה] another - when the plan is that the wedding will be after a lengthy amount of time.


7

This opinion is cited in the Taz YD 193 sk 4 and 196 sk 5. The idea is roughly that for hymenal bleeding, which only effects a Niddah Derabanan, there is no need to be stringent to add a 5th day. After any ordinary menstrual bleeding, this wouldn't apply. "Marriage" technically has nothing to do with it.


6

Jewish law dictates that there be a marriage ceremony. The ceremony entails erusin, also known as kidushin, and nisuin. The former designates the wife to the husband and the latter starts their life together. This was true two millennia ago and remains true today. See e.g. Wikipedia or Judaism 101.


6

Yes they are allowed to marry. The problems are discussed here. I personally know of such couples (and also brother-sister, sister-brother cross-over) among the most ultra-orthodox chasidim.


5

It is a gemara in Pesachim 112a which talks about advice from the chachamim (I don't believe this is quoted in the poskim-not sure ): לא תבשל בקדירה שבישל בה חבירך מאי ניהו גרושה בחיי בעלה דאמר מר גרוש שנשא גרושה ארבע דעות במטה ואי בעית אימא אפילו באלמנה לפי שאין כל אצבעות שוות Do not cook in a pot that your friend already cooked in.What does this mean: ...


5

Well, having been through this before my own wedding, I can tell you some of the things that are looked out for: Ketuba - this really functions as an attestation from a previous Beis Din that the person (or their mother or perhaps mother's mother) is Jewish. A Get would serve the same purpose, if the Ketuba wasn't available. A document attesting to ...


5

Rashi in Beshalach on "chamushim" states that all those left behind died during the three days of darkness. Every member of Bnai Yisrael who survived left in the Exodus. Thus, if a husband or wife was left behind, the person who left was a widow or widower.


5

I doubt you would find any Halachic authorities who recommend giving a conditional Get. The reason being that after giving such a Get, he may not seclude himself with his wife. If he did seclude himself - and there are witnesses, then even if she subsequently fulfills the condition on the Get, she is only possibly divorced - הֲרֵי זוֹ סְפֵק מְגֹרֶשֶׁת. ...


5

In בכורות דף מז, there is a dispute as to whether someone who had children and then converted had fulfilled the mitzvah of פרו ורבו, the commandment for Jews to have children. R' Yochanan says he has, for there is a commandment for even gentiles to have children, as the Torah says לשבת יצרה, mankind was created to multiply. Resh lakish argued because a ...


5

It is very difficult to find accurate statistics on divorce, and differences between countries are so great that any answer can only be useful from a specific countries' perspective. Finding prevalence statistics specifically focused on shidduchim is even harder. On of the problem of using divorce statistics is that part of the high reported rates of divorce ...


5

This exact question is asked in the first perek of Derech Eretz Rabba. As recounted in another answer essentially the response is that this Kal V'Chomer would be oker (uproot) something from the torah, in this case the possibility of a Kohen Gadol marrying and thereby having children, and we do not allow for kal v'chomers which uproot something from the ...


5

Another answer addressed how marriages became officialized. The question also asked about registration, so I'll address that. There was no official registration of a marriage. There were various forms of testimony which could be used to substantiate the claim that a man and woman were married, such as the marriage document (kesuba), witnesses of the ...


5

Yevamos 63a: אשכחיה רבי יוסי לאליהו א"ל כתיב אעשה לו עזר במה אשה עוזרתו לאדם א"ל אדם מביא חיטין חיטין כוסס פשתן פשתן לובש לא נמצאת מאירה עיניו ומעמידתו על רגליו Rebbi Yosi found Eliyahu. He said to him "it is written 'I shall make for him a helper' - in what way does she help man?" He responded "A man brings [home] wheat -does he chew on wheat? [He ...


5

I can offer you one anecdotal piece of evidence. My wife and I were married by a Conservative rabbi in a town we had lived in for only a few years. He was satisfied of my wife's status by her conversion certificate from the Bet Din. For me, it was an interview. He had to rely on my telling of my family history for my status. I know he wished for something ...


5

I checked through the Nitei Gavriel on Nisuin and there is no mention of such a Minhag. I personally have also never heard or seen such a custom. The closest I found is the Rokeach 353 who mentions that after the Brachos of the Chuppa they give the Chassan and Kallah honey and cheese to eat based on the verse (Shir Hashirim 4:11) "Devash Vchalav Tachas ...


5

At first glance the daughter is either herself a convert, or the product of a kohen's prohibited marriage to a convert, i.e. a chalala. Either way she'd be prohibited from marrying a Kohen.


5

Rav Moshe Feinstein (below) rules that the wife takes the customs of the husband whether they are more lenient or more strict (as is by anyone that moves to a different place and plans to stay there he keeps the customs of that place Shulchan Aruch yd 214.2) האשה צריכה להתנהג כמנהג הבעל בין לחומרא בין לקולא Igros Moshe 1.158 I forgot to send you MAZAL TOV ...


4

I finally found the Sefer Lulei Toratcha stories with Rav Shach on the parsha.Parshas Matos 30:4. Rav Shach answered that she should name the child Shmayah since it is similar to the name Shimon and in this way she can be miskayim the neder a little bit.


4

I found this "Halacha" in the Kaf HaChaim, Orach Chaim 240:63 ישכב תמיד במטה מיוחדת בפני עצמו. ואם צריך לשמש לשם מצות פו׳׳ר אחר גמר .השימוש כמו חצי שעה יקום וישוב למטה היוחד לו. אור הצדיקים סי׳ כז׳ אות ג׳ Furthermore, in Sefer Piskei Teshuvos, (pamphlet on Siman 240, footnote 226), the author quotes his father as being against the practice of having a ...


4

Like others, I couldn't think of a single halachic reason to forbid weddings. I know I've seen dozens of Bar Mitzvahs over the years there, but never a wedding. (On Monday and Thursday around mid morning it seems like there's a bar mitzvah every 20 minutes). I did some digging and eventually found the rabinate's rules for the kotel, and it is true that they ...


4

This is documented in Shulchan Aruch, Even HaEzer around Siman 80 - including סימן פ - מעשה ידיה שהיא חיבת לבעלה, ודיני מיניקה ושאינה רוצה לעשות מלאכה Some of her duties include: א מַעֲשֵׂה יָדֶיהָ לְבַעֲלָהּ What she earns belongs to her husband. What she finds, also - that's in another Siman. ד וְכֵן כָּל אִשָּׁה רוֹחֶצֶת לְבַעֲלָהּ פָּנָיו ...


4

First you need to define what you mean by Evil Eye. More to the point, the Talmud does mention that a wife's tears can have a tragic effect on the husband's well being. E.g.: The Gemara in Kethuboth 62b cites the case of Rav Rechumi was arrived home late for his annual (Erev Yom Kippour) visit. His wife got so worried that she started crying, and he was ...


3

Your assumption is based upon an opinion in Talmud which is not the standard accepted opinion. The Rambam and Shulchan Aruch codified the opinion of Rabi Shimon bar Yochai found in maseches Avoda Zara 36b stating that marriage to any nonjew is biblical, it was casual promiscuity I.e. znus which the beis din of Chashmonaim enacted their nashga/nashgaz ...


3

It's difficult to our modern ears, but originally Judaism allowed a man to have multiple wives, whereas a woman could only have one husband. (The ban on polygamy didn't happen until about a thousand years ago in Ashkenazic lands.) Therefore, in theory as a man could sneak away from his wife and marry another woman, we can't define "adultery" in the same ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible