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13

In the Tzavaos of Rabbi Yehuda HaChasid #25 seen here he says two brothers should not marry two sisters. See note #37 (#32 in the linked edition) from Rabbi Reuven Margolis quoting the Noda Biyehuda Even HaEzer 79 who brings cases in the gemara where we see this was not something they adhered to. EDIT: To clarify the issue and for those who don't know, ...


12

There isn't a contradiction here. The sources are talking about two things: [1] A woman's right to conjugal relations/sexual fulfillment/attention and her husband's duty to be available to her sexually. The halakhah limits his duty to within reason - and reason dictates that independently wealthy men need to be available to their wives daily if need be, as ...


10

The difference is discussed extensively in the eighth perek of Ketubot. נכסי מלוג refers to assets that a woman brings into the marriage, or which falls to her as either an inheritance or as a gift after she has married, but which are not included in the value of the ketubah. The word melog comes from the Aramaic מליגה, which means "plucking": her husband ...


9

The general answer is no it is not acceptable. Marrying and having children is a personal obligation of every Jewish man. Even if a man has the required number of children, or is unable to have children, in Judaism it is still required to get married (to avoid other sins of a sexual nature). (Shulchan Aruch Even HaEzer 1:1 and 1:8) However, there is one ...


9

Halochos Gedolos - Halachos Arayos brings that this question was asked by Yosi ben Tadai Ish Teveria to Rabbi Gamliel. Rabbi Gamliel answered him that it would be impossible for a Kohain Gadol to ever get married. The Mishne Halachos there explains that by the same logic a Kohain Gadol would be unable to marry anyone's daughter, as every woman with a ...


8

Tzitz Eliezer 14:73 spells this one out very explicitly: it's identical for sons and daughters -- the parents can't force them to marry or not-marry someone if they don't want to. (Though he adds that it's usually the right thing to do for both sons and daughters to ask their parents' advice or otherwise involve them somehow.) There is one responsum of ...


7

The Gmara in Yebamot (63a) says that an unmarried man is not a man:> א"ר אלעזר כל אדם שאין לו אשה אינו אדם שנאמר(בראשית ה, ב) זכר ונקבה בראם ויקרא את שמם אדם  And that a man without a woman is unhappy, unblessed and not good (Yebamut 62b): א"ר חנילאי כל אדם שאין לו אשה שרוי בלא שמחה בלא ברכה בלא טובה בלא שמחה דכתיב(דברים יד, כו) ושמחת אתה וביתך בלא ברכה ...


7

My translation: In these days, for many reasons (including also - reasons of Yiras Shamayim [דיר"ש = דיראת שמים]) it is not a desirable thing to commit oneself and how much more so [ועאכו"כ = ועל אחת כמה וכמה] another - when the plan is that the wedding will be after a lengthy amount of time.


6

Nit'e Gavriel, Nisuin 1, chapter 37, is about the yichud room and he mentions no prohibition on kissing that I see.


6

The basic rule is there is no allowance to speak lashon hara to relatives. See for instance Hilchos Lashon Hara Klal 8, Siff 10 on page 215. In fact the Chafetz Chaim there advises against telling your wife all the ways you were mistreated during the day because it will cause her to lose respect for you too! The Chafetz Chaim in Hilchos Lashon Hara Klal 6, ...


6

Both the first relationship and the second one would have to be formal marriages (the kind that requires a Get to dissolve) for the prohibition of remarrying your divorcée to come into effect. (ShA EH 10:1) You already asked elsewhere about giving Gittin to girlfriends after breaking up with them.


6

Judaism requires Jews to marry other Jews. But, like many laws, not everyone keeps this. A religiously-observant Jewish man is allowed to marry a non-religiously-observant Jewish woman, but they will have to have some serious conversations -- for instance, if she doesn't keep kosher but he does, will the kitchen be kosher? A non-observant Jewish man could ...


6

Jewish law dictates that there be a marriage ceremony. The ceremony entails erusin, also known as kidushin, and nisuin. The former designates the wife to the husband and the latter starts their life together. This was true two millennia ago and remains true today. See e.g. Wikipedia or Judaism 101.


6

Yes they are allowed to marry. The problems are discussed here. I personally know of such couples (and also brother-sister, sister-brother cross-over) among the most ultra-orthodox chasidim.


5

The Rama writes (EH 21:5) יש אומרים דאין לנהוג אפילו עם אשתו בדברים של חיבה, כגון לעיין ברישיה אם יש לו כינים, בפני אחרים Some say that you shouldn't act with your wife in affectionate matters, such as checking her head for lice, in front of others. While some have extended this to prohibit any public indication of her Niddah status (such as via ...


5

To avoid repetition I will address only the relative prohibition of Jews and non-Jews, not the nature of the prohibition of non-Jews discussed fairly extensively in the linked page. At face value the prohibition of a Jewish nidda indeed seems much more severe. However, R. Yaakov Kamenetzky famously held that it was preferable to maintain a relationship ...


5

I doubt you would find any Halachic authorities who recommend giving a conditional Get. The reason being that after giving such a Get, he may not seclude himself with his wife. If he did seclude himself - and there are witnesses, then even if she subsequently fulfills the condition on the Get, she is only possibly divorced - הֲרֵי זוֹ סְפֵק מְגֹרֶשֶׁת. ...


5

It is a gemara in Pesachim 112a which talks about advice from the chachamim (I don't believe this is quoted in the poskim-not sure ): לא תבשל בקדירה שבישל בה חבירך מאי ניהו גרושה בחיי בעלה דאמר מר גרוש שנשא גרושה ארבע דעות במטה ואי בעית אימא אפילו באלמנה לפי שאין כל אצבעות שוות Do not cook in a pot that your friend already cooked in.What does this mean: ...


5

Rashi in Beshalach on "chamushim" states that all those left behind died during the three days of darkness. Every member of Bnai Yisrael who survived left in the Exodus. Thus, if a husband or wife was left behind, the person who left was a widow or widower.


5

Well, having been through this before my own wedding, I can tell you some of the things that are looked out for: Ketuba - this really functions as an attestation from a previous Beis Din that the person (or their mother or perhaps mother's mother) is Jewish. A Get would serve the same purpose, if the Ketuba wasn't available. A document attesting to ...


5

In בכורות דף מז, there is a dispute as to whether someone who had children and then converted had fulfilled the mitzvah of פרו ורבו, the commandment for Jews to have children. R' Yochanan says he has, for there is a commandment for even gentiles to have children, as the Torah says לשבת יצרה, mankind was created to multiply. Resh lakish argued because a ...


5

This exact question is asked in the first perek of Derech Eretz Rabba. As recounted in another answer essentially the response is that this Kal V'Chomer would be oker (uproot) something from the torah, in this case the possibility of a Kohen Gadol marrying and thereby having children, and we do not allow for kal v'chomers which uproot something from the ...


5

Another answer addressed how marriages became officialized. The question also asked about registration, so I'll address that. There was no official registration of a marriage. There were various forms of testimony which could be used to substantiate the claim that a man and woman were married, such as the marriage document (kesuba), witnesses of the ...


5

Yevamos 63a: אשכחיה רבי יוסי לאליהו א"ל כתיב אעשה לו עזר במה אשה עוזרתו לאדם א"ל אדם מביא חיטין חיטין כוסס פשתן פשתן לובש לא נמצאת מאירה עיניו ומעמידתו על רגליו Rebbi Yosi found Eliyahu. He said to him "it is written 'I shall make for him a helper' - in what way does she help man?" He responded "A man brings [home] wheat -does he chew on wheat? [He ...


5

I can offer you one anecdotal piece of evidence. My wife and I were married by a Conservative rabbi in a town we had lived in for only a few years. He was satisfied of my wife's status by her conversion certificate from the Bet Din. For me, it was an interview. He had to rely on my telling of my family history for my status. I know he wished for something ...


4

I finally found the Sefer Lulei Toratcha stories with Rav Shach on the parsha.Parshas Matos 30:4. Rav Shach answered that she should name the child Shmayah since it is similar to the name Shimon and in this way she can be miskayim the neder a little bit.


4

There is nothing special going on here based on the marriage relationship. Anyone can say to anyone else: "Do you swear XYZ?" and if they answer affirmatively, the oath is binding on them. So too if a husband says to his wife "Do you swear to not talk to Ploni-down-the-street?" The relevant rule in this case is that breaking that specific oath is considered ...


4

There is no "book" of the rulings of Rabbeinu Gershom. Many items are referenced by later Rishonim in Ashkenaz as takkanot (rulings) of Rabbeinu Gershom, but there is no authoritative list in any one place. There is also no English translation for most of the following, which may be why no one has quoted them: The earliest attributions to Rabbeinu Gershom ...


4

Like others, I couldn't think of a single halachic reason to forbid weddings. I know I've seen dozens of Bar Mitzvahs over the years there, but never a wedding. (On Monday and Thursday around mid morning it seems like there's a bar mitzvah every 20 minutes). I did some digging and eventually found the rabinate's rules for the kotel, and it is true that they ...



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