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12

Rav Moshe Feinstein (O.C. IV 60) strongly disagreed with the use of timers. His strongest definite reason is that its usage is a disgrace to shabbos, since through their use one can run a business and circumvent shabbos. This is a Torah violation of "honoring shabbos". (Contrast this with placing a pot on the stove right before shabbos, where that is ...


9

Rabbi Heinemann (shlit"a)'s opinion: Rabbi Moshe Heinemann, Rabbinic Administrator of the Star-K, is of the opinion that if the restaurant is known mainly for the traif, non-kosher, products it sells, McDonald's, for example, then going into such a place [just to buy a plain coffee] would constitute marris ayin. An establishment like a coffee shop or ...


9

Disclosure: I'm not an authority on Judaism nor am I Jewish. Therefore, my answer is necessarily incomplete. I'm also an active participant on Biblical Hermeneutics and a moderator pro tempore there. Our FAQ actively solicits answers from a Jewish perspective. Also, I consider myself your friend. Therefore, my answer is hopelessly biased and "too ...


9

I once heard Rav Shmuel Kaminetsky describing the life of a certain Rav in a little shtetel many years ago. The people of the village were unlearned, and the Rav, who was a big Talmid Chacham, had no one with whom to converse in Torah learning. What did he do? He would put his hat on the banister next to the Aron Hakodesh, and speak as if there was an ...


8

You don't need to jump straight to declining the invitation. There might be things you can eat, and even if not you won't be impolite to the restaurant by joining a paying group. The key is to communicate clearly. You can explain to the person who invited you -- or, more likely, his administrative assistant -- that you would be delighted to come to the ...


8

Maris Ayin (literally "the vision of the eye") describes rabbinic enactments that were put into place to prevent a third-party viewing one's actions from arriving at the incorrect conclusion that a forbidden action is permitted. Examples: It is forbidden to eat the blood of fish (which itself is permitted according to Torah law) lest someone watching you ...


7

You can use an electric timer to turn your lights on and off, where manipulating the lights directly would not be permitted. A computer seems like just a specialized case of this, so long as you are not interacting with the computer on Shabbat/Yom Tov. As @tom smith notes in a comment, if the effect of your programmed computer use would lead people to ...


6

No. You do not have to worry about Marit Ayin. Marit Ayin is when a Jew does something technically permitted, but may cause someone to reason that a different activity is permitted, when in fact, it is forbidden. The classic example of this is hanging wet laundry to dry on shabbat. (Talmud Bavli, Shabbat 146b) Technically, if you washed clothes on ...


5

The Igrot Moshe writes (Yoreh De'ah 2:56) that it is even ASUR to listen to music (even just instruments) that has Avoda Zara/Christian intent in it. You are singing which means you also hear what you are saying which would be Asur (prohibited).


5

And as for the matter of whether it's permissible to eat in a restaurant in which they prepare only dairy foods but which is of people who desecrate the sabbath, lo, even in that place there can be a number of forbidden foods such as non-kosher fishes, and the fat in which they fry [things] can be from non-kosher animals or animals not properly ...


5

From daat.ac.il: (Non-quoted paragraphs are ones I have summarized from that page.) The discussion seems to center around the following Halacha (SA 252:1). It is permitted to start an action on Friday near darkness even though the work cannot be completed on Friday and can only be finished on Shabbat. The Gemara (Shabbos 18a) records a dispute ...


5

Presumably if you're traveling on the road, your not likely to be recognized by your face as people will not know you. Keeping a baseball cap handy, can take away the question of "Mares Ayin" when the situation arises. I think a more interesting question might be with places like Dunkin Donuts and Starbucks that are frequented by many frum Kosher keeping ...


5

I sent an e-mail message to the Institute of Halacha at the Star-K. Here is the response that I received shortly after: Hello, Rav Moshe Feinstein writes that there is an issue of maaris ayin if a person goes to a non-kosher restaurant.  McDonalds would certainly classify as a non-Jewish restaurant.  However, even though Starbucks does sell some ...


4

Not all the time when you see someone doing something wrong you must assume they are doing it Behetter, or there would never be a commandment of "Hocheiach Tocheiach". (For example, one should rebuke a religious Jew who is seen eating pig meat, even though it is possible that he is about to die if he doesn't). Even if the other should judge you favourably, ...


4

To sum up what's been said, there are three concerns involved of what people might think when seeing you in a non-kosher restaurant: "If Moshe eats there, it must be kosher." (This is especially a problem with a "kosher-style" restaurant, or one with a very questionable hechsher.) "I know it's prohibited, but if Moshe eats there, it must be one of those ...


4

It's been addressed by the OU lecture series on kashrut in and out of the workplace . They made clear this was only intended for use vis-a-vis business; don't go hanging out at a non-kosher restaurant on weekends for the fun of it, even if you bring your own food. Rabbi Moshe Feinstein frowned on the practice, though he allowed using a restroom if needed. ...


4

We may be able to infer from Rav Schachter's words (until 7:15) in response to a related question (first part of #1) that the second option is preferable.


4

It was well know in the 1980's in our Yeshiva - Kol Torah - that the Rosh Yeshiva - HoRav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach זצ"ל used to light his Menora at his front door and a single candle at the window facing Rehov Usishkin.


4

There is a gemara in Beitzah 9 that brings a shitta that "Afilu b'chadrei chadarim" even in the the innermost room maris ayin applies even when alone. The Rambam paskans like that in hilchos shabbas 22:20.The Shulchan Aruch OC 301:45 paskens like that as well.


3

There is a third Halachic concept which answers the question. This is sort of like when we have 2 psukim which seem to contradict each other, until a third pasuk comes to resolve it. The third halachic concept, and in this case a mitzvah, is "Lifni Iver", or not to put a stumbling block in front of the blind. True, we should give our fellows the benefit of ...


3

See the following link for a teshuvah of Bemareh Habazak vol. 5, siman 37 regarding a website operating on Shabbat: http://beta.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=43790&st=&pgnum=66 The conclusion there is that there is no problem of ma'arit ayin as it is well known that it operates automatically. The same would seem to apply to your case as well.


3

The P'ri To'ar (YD 19:1) in a discussion of the obligation to slaughter a Ben Pekua' (live offspring found in a kosher slaughtered mother which biblically is included in the mother's slaughtering but rabbinically requires its own slaughtering because of chashad -- looking suspicious) mentions this rule of Chanukkah (which also relates to chashad) and notes ...


2

Halachipedia (link) cites Mesechtas Shabbos 64b and Tosfas Mesechtas Kesubos 60a as saying that marit ayin applies even in private, but possibly only for d'oraisa: When something is not allowed because of maris ayin, then it is not permitted in one's room either (chadrei chadurim - privately). Some say this is only something which is perceived as an ...


2

Since the label is sewn into the inside of the suit, how would anyone know that it is not there? I normally staple it into the inside of the suit so that I will remember that I have had it checked. If it is not there, you might get it confused with a different suit that you need to check. Marit Ayin is a matter of how something appears to people walking by ...


2

Your question seems to concern balancing considerations of mar'is ayin and shalom bayis (family harmony). One source you might consider is the ruling of R' Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe OC 2:40) regarding entering a non-kosher restaurant: And therefore, there is even reason to prohibit entering to eat items that are known to definitely be kosher (e.g. ...


2

There are things which are prohibited because they often lead to Lashon Harah. These are generally classified as the prohibitions of Avak Lashon Harah, such as talking excessively of someone's praises, or talking about someone (non-negatively) in front of someone who hates that person. So to answer your penultimate question, yes, you do have a certain ...


1

Yad Malachi states in the name of the pri chadash, Yorah De'ah siman 87 sk 7 that we don't make up new concerns of maris ayin beyond what is in the Gemara.


1

I have, several times, called a shaatnez lab (the so-called "Mikdash Melech" one in Midwood, though I think it no longer has any connection with Mikdash Melech), asked about a certain article of clothing whether it has shaatnez, and was told that there is a chazaka (reliable status quo, in this case based on the manufacturer and place of origin) that it does ...


1

From pirkei Avos perek 1:11 we see that Avtaylon warned not to say something which can be misconstrued .one should be as clear as possible. One can also see from the gemara in Yoma 86a that the Rabbanim would be careful with their actions so one should not learn and misinterpret their actions(see case with Rav and Abaye) and cause the greatest sin of ...


1

Elsewhere Rabbi Feinstein clarifies two different concerns when doing something that has the appearance of impropriety; both of which apply here: Maris Ayin: "I saw a top contributor to J.SE eating there, so everything there must be 100% kosher!" Or a fascinating corollary: "Okay officially the websites say it's not recommended, but if a top ...



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