New answers tagged

1

First, the Tiberian mesoretes dispute whether "mimenu" here is in the plural or not -- "mimenu" can also be rendered "than he" as in "has become someone like him" (or Him). Ben Naftali takes this position, and renders the word "מִמֶנוּ" (without dots in the 2nd mem or nun). Rashi follows Ben Naftali's take on this verse. "Behold man will be unique among the ...


3

I found a reference by google but it seems to say that there is no reference by any talmudic sources at all. The only reference given is to Josephus. I did not find any Jewish references to it in google. Pool of Bethesda The area of the Pools of Bethesda has always had a source of water. In the days of the Old Testament, the area was outside the city ...


1

From here Another type of angels are those that are created through the deeds of man. In the words of our Sages: "He who fulfills one mitzvah, acquires for himself one angel-advocate; he who commits one transgression, acquires against himself one angel-accuser."(ovois 4.11 These are formed from the (intellectual and emotional) energy which one invests in ...


6

The Jewish view is that everything that has been created is under the control of G0d and cannot be considered an independent being in the sense that non-Jewish religions regard "Satan" (as a "rebellious" angel). One of the translations of the word is "prosecutor". Only human beings have free will and the associated "desires" that can cause them to rebel ...


2

in shaarei kedusha intro "And there are those among them which would swear in angels using the powers in holy names.. they desired lofty levels, close to prophecy, and therefore they put themselves in some danger. And for us, would that it were that we would merit a little Ruach HaKodesh such as a revelation of Eliyahu HaNavi (Elijah the ...


0

According to the Rambam all instances of descriptions of people encountering angles are actually events which only happened within the mind of the person experiencing the events.


4

Strangely enough, while looking through a book today that I am reviewing for a different question, I saw an answer to your exact question. The book is called Sefer HaGematriot by Rabbi Yehudah HaChassid. In the second volume, parshat Vayeitzei, 9, it discusses this subject. It explains that specifically with those you enumerate, Avraham, Yaacov and Moshe, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included