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The word elokim means many things. An angel. A judge. A power (i.e. foreign deity). And also at times Hashem, specifically his powerful judgement atribute. The torah does not specify which it means.


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The Ramchal in Derech Hashem states (as far as i understand) that the purpose of angels/spiritual forces is to give man the ability to make greater impacts and changes. That everything emanates from the infinite, and there is a gradual unfolding of the divine will starting with the most non physical of forces and eventually to more and more physical (ie. ...


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Rabbi Ahron Lopiansky described angels as being for our benefit. The parable he used was as follows; when a layperson looks at a car, they have no idea how it runs, it is just a car. However when they are able to separate the different parts of the car, they can begin to fathom how the car functions. Per this, angels exist to help us understand creation and ...


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Rambam (Moreh Nevuchim 1:49) stated that all the instances of interactions with angels seen in the Torah are simply prophetic visions and that angels lack any will or power. Thus, the "purpose" of angels is to act as tools for Hashem when they are needed to help Hashem communicate or maintain the universe. ...


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Even though God is omnipotent and does not have needed to rest, but he did so on the seventh day and made it holy. This suggests that although there is no direct need for angels to do His work, it does allow us to better understand how this work is arranged and split amongst various role players. I particularly like the story about the angel of ...


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I think one could argue that in Numbers 20:29, we have a new generation, and this generation is more aware and less likely to misread the information given. However, a simpler explanation might be gleaned from looking at the source text for Rashi's comment on Numbers 20:29, which is the Midrash Tanchuma Chukat, siman 17 (s.v. וידבר ה׳ אל משה קח את אהרן ...


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Everyone who had seen Moses dead at Sinai was themselves dead. Just as the people believed that image, they believed this image.


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Rabbi Ozer Alport from his weekly divrei Torah Parsha Potpourri quotes from the Pnennim Mshulchan Gevoha: Rav Elya Meir Bloch explains that this case was different, in that Moshe had already told the people that he witnessed Aharon’s death. They didn’t believe how the angel of death could have power over Aharon, so they were shown Aharon’s image to prove ...


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I would like to suggest an answer. We know that the Satan has permission from Hashem to play tricks on people to tempt them to sin. This can go so far, like we find in the Parsha of a false prophet (Devarim 13:3) that he can even create real miracles and we are still not allowed to follow him based on what we see, when he tells us to commit Idolatry. ...



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