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20

Judaism believes in angels, but one is not permitted to pray to an angel or any intermediary. (According to Rambam and Ramban, praying to angels is idolatrous. Others may be more lenient.) Images of angels may also be problematic in certain cases. Although "Shalom Alechem" is a widespread custom, there are some people who refrain from saying some (or even ...


15

Angels are spiritual, not physical, so they don't have a physical appearance. They can, however appear physically in a sort of "disguise", like when the 3 angels came to Abraham disguised as men.


14

There is an aggadah in Bavli Sotah 11b that is almost exactly what you're describing. It's in the section that starts with Rav Avira saying that B'nei Yisrael were redeemed from Mitzrayim on account of the righteous women. First they would encourage their husbands in the mitzvah of p'ru ur'vu, then they would stay in their houses while pregnant, and then ...


10

I have never seen one :) But our Rabbis have told us of at least one characteristic of Angels is that they appear to have one straight foot. The relevance to our daily lives is that when praying the Amidah prayer we are instructed to stand with our legs together in order to resemble Angels. The source for this can be found in the code of Jewish Law A quote ...


9

Your father is an outlier. Angels are undisputedly an integral part of Jewish theology. By way of proof, see Genesis 32:4, in which Jacob sends angels to his brother Esau. Lest you think that "mal'achim" (מלאכים) there means "messengers", Rash"i (the pre-eminent commentary on the 5 Books of Moses) there states clearly, "מלאכים ממש" - real angels. The ...


9

The Lubavitcher Rebbe said a sicha on this topic, and I really recommend reading it in full. Abridged and translated here. Original and unedited here. In summary, Rashi explains the concept of "confounding Satan" as follows: "So that he will not accuse; for when he hears how the Jewish people love the mitzvos, his words of accusation are stifled." ...


8

From here: Although it seems strange to bid farewell to the angels so quickly -- why not invite them to join the Shabbat meal? -- Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak of Lubavitch explained that it is in bad taste to eat while others who are not eating (or in this case, cannot eat) are watching I also once heard that the Lubavitcher Rebbe said that every second of an ...


8

Machatzit Hashekel Siman 262: We don't know when they are going to leave. So we ask them to bless us whenever they decide to leave. Similar to "Blessed are you when coming and blessed when leaving". Avnei Nezer: Shalom Aleichem we say to the Malhachei Hashabat that "came" with us from Shul and Tsetchem Leshalom we say to the Malhacei Hachol (Mundane? ...


8

The siddur “Ishei Yisroel MaihaGr”a” says the following (my translation from the 2008 edition) in a footnote, “I have seen in the name of the Gr”a (see what is written in the Keser Rosh simon 93) that he protests how can one ask for a blessing from the angels. But it seems that the one who heard this (protest) made an error because his words really apply to ...


8

Whether that statement means that the angels don't understand Aramaic, or that they can understand it but consider it vulgar, is a topic of debate among the various commentaries. There is a summary of the whole issue, with extensive sources, in Beis Aharon, s.v. אין מלאכי השרת מכירין בלשון ארמי. Maharsha (to Sotah 33a) explains that the specific mention of ...


8

The Ohr HaChaim writes (Bereishis 1:1 note 3): אמרו ז''ל (חגיגה טו.) במעשה מט''ט שדנוהו לפני אלישע ומחיוהו שתין פולסי דנורא, וגם אליהו וכו' (ב''מ פה:) וכמה משפטים לשרי מעלה, והגם שאין להם יצר, עם כל זה ימצא בהם הטעות, כי לפעמים לא יכוונו אל האמת וישגו, וצא ולמד ממעשה המלאך מט''ט ואליהו כי שגגו וכן יקר מקרה ויענישם ה' אפילו על השוגג מה שאין שופט ...


8

Pirkei DeRabbi Eliezer, perek 24, makes it clear that while other nations get their own angel, Israel gets Hashem himself. ר' שמעון אומר קרא הקב"ה לשבעים מלאכים המסובבים כסא כבודו ואמ' להם באו ונבלבל את לשונם ומנין שהקב"ה ירד אליהם שנאמר הבה נרדה ארדה אין כתיב אלא נרדה ומנין מהפיל גורלות בניהם שנאמר בהנחל עליון גוים ונפל גורלו של הקב"ה על אברהם ועל זרעו ...


7

It is said in the name of Rabbi Akiva Eiger as follows: The Talmud states that if one repents due to fear of punishment, his sins are converted to unintentional sins. However, if one repents out of love, his sins are converted to Mitzvoth (good deeds). Rashi states that the extra shofar blasts show the love Jews have for Mitzvoth, this implies that their ...


7

It is clear that angels have jealousy towards humans from Tosfiyos Brachos 3a that says that some say that we say certain prayers in Aramaic in order that the angels should not be jealous of us, and Tosfiyos does not say there is no jealousy, only that we say other prayers in Lashon Kodesh so that can not be the reason. Also Rashi Braishis 1:26 indicates ...


7

The only place angels are mentioned by name in Tanakh is in Daniel (chs 8-10). In the Yerushalmi, we find a statement of Resh Laqish that the names of the angels we brought back from the Babylonian exile, and were unknown in pre-exilic Israel (Yerushalmi Rosh haShana 1:2). The later one moves, the more names of angels there are, beginning with a few more in ...


7

No, no, and no. The Jewish messiah needs to be a flesh-and-blood paternal descendant of King David. See the answers to this question for more details.


7

It was R' Masya ben Charash. The Tanchuma (Chukas) relates the story you mention, except it says that he burned his eyes (he didn't stab them). The story is related in the Hebrew Wikipedia article (fn. 14).


7

Bzir Aviezer - Rabbi Chaim Aviezer Morgenstern Zatzal explains as follows based on the Gemara in Taanis 10a which says that Hashem gives rain to Eretz Yisrael by himself and other locations through a messenger. Rabbi Yochanan who was in Eretz Yisrael said that rain comes directly from Hashem. Raba who was out of Eretz Yisrael saw the Malach Ridiya who is in ...


6

The ladder in the dream is interpreted according to the theme of interpretation one uses for the rest of the dream. The commentators vary drastically with respect to the interpretation and purpose of Yaakov's dream, and thus each to his own regarding what the ladder represents as well. For most, the ladder in the dream is just as symbolic as the angels going ...


6

The Tosafot there (Shabbat 12b) writes that only the angel Gavriel knows Aramaic. This is probably the angel that taught Maran. EDIT: I found a Ros"h in Berachot 2:2 that says it's not that they don't understand Aramaic, it simply is not favorable in their eyes. The Maadanei Yom Tov (note 7) ask a question that I won't bring up, but I will bring down what ...


6

There is really no such thing as an icon in Judaism. Icons are objects of veneration in some Christian confessions, especially in Eastern Orthodox Christianity. Judaism, on the other hand, expressly forbids any form of worship of images or statues. Jews are not forbidden to create images, and angels are present in Jewish art. Such images simply do not ...


6

Taken from here: The Talmud (Chulin 91b) examines the angels' Divine service and concludes, "There exist three categories of angels who sing G-d's praise. The first group exclaims the blessing 'Holy' once. A second assembly praises G-d twice, 'Holy, holy.' And the third set repeats the acclaim three times, 'Holy, holy, holy is the L-rd of hosts'." The ...


6

In Tanach the name only appears as Uriel, such as in Divrei HaYomim1 6:9 אוּרִיאֵל בְּנוֹ, and Divrei Hayomim1 15:5 אוּרִיאֵל הַשָּׂר, and Divrei Hayomim1 15:11 לְאוּרִיאֵל, and Divrei HaYomim2 13:2 בַת-אוּרִיאֵל. The Malach is also pronounced as Uriel per Koren and Artscroll Sidurim by Kriyas Shema that is said before going to sleep. I have found that ...


6

Rav Ahron Lopiansky seemed to dispell this myth as being an old bubby's tale in a lecture. His words were some thing along the lines of "Yiddishe bubbies say that this is the makeh, (slap)", while gesturing to his philtrum, with a smile on his face. I subsequently had a phone conversation in which I asked him directly for his stance. He said that he hasn't ...


6

Rabbeinu Nissim, when discussing the law surrounding the depiction of angels, describes them as appearing in visions of prophecy as אדם שיש לו כנפים‏, a person who has wings. I have found other descriptions of angels in the Talmud. Before I mention them, I want to stress that while the Sages' words seem to describe some angels in a certain way, one ...


6

You are using the term "satan" as if it is a being with independent thoughts, desires, and will. This is a mistake. It is actually "the accuser" or the "yeitzer harah". Thus, it can be considered that a person is confronted by all the various situations and problems in the world is confronted by the "Satan". It is the commonly accepted view that "satan" is ...


5

In Yehoshua 14:15 Rashi, Radak, and Metzudas Dovid all say that the father of Achiman, Sheshai, and Talmai was Arba. The Shaarei Aaron in Parshas Shelach Perek 13 Pasuk 33 mentions in the name of Reb Yeshaya and Rashi that they were descendants of Og since the Pasuk says "Vehu Nishar MiYeser HaRafaim". However, Rabbi Samson Refael Hirsch maintains that it ...


5

The experience was needed for a good reason. It's interesting that because of this fight, he was told he would get the name Yisrael. Some explanations include: The experience taught Yaakov that he was strong enough. You don't know your own strength until you're put to the test. You don't activate your full potential unless you're put to the test. (I ...


5

There are different types of angels, as we were taught. And the question of what they do depends on what types of angels they are. Some interpretations of the Sepher Yetzirah tells us that some angels were actually "agents" of creation, each representing the different stages of creation ("stages" were , of course, just based on our perception), thus, it was ...


5

Traditionally, the name Gavriel is translated as "Gd is my strength", or more literally, "My strength, Gd". Gavriel is first mentioned in the book of Daniel, where he speaks to Daniel to let him understand why the Jewish people were not being redeemed at that time. He appeases Daniel by letting him know that even though the people are not being saved now, ...



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