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The rabbinate is actually doing its best to not impose at all. There are many tithes separated from produce in Israel and the rabbinate, in certifying that given produce is kosher (if requested to do so by the grower), only removes those tithes which cannot be eaten nowadays, namely, Terumah Gedolah and Terumat Maaser (totaling about 1% of the crop), plus in ...


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As I explain in More Maaser and Tax Math and as can be seen in Maaser Kesafim: Giving a Tenth to Charity this is the equivalent of having made a neder to give a minimum percentage to tzedakah. Thus, one is obligated as soon as the income is received. However, one can maintain a ledger of income as it comes in and tzedakah as it is distributed so that one can ...


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Technically, ma'aser is the obligation in the Torah to give a tenth from animals and certain crops. Tzedakah is the obligation to support the poor and does not have a fixed amount. Nowadays, people (in effect) make a neder to give one tenth of all income to tzedakah (similar to the neder that Yaakov makes in Vayeitzei 28:22). They call this ma'aser kesafim ...


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You are talking about terumah or trumas ma'aser which cannot be eaten nowadays because it must be kept in a state of tahara (ritual purity). Thanks to @DannySchoemann for the correction. Since everyone is tamei meis (ritual impurity because of contact with the dead), it cannot be eaten and must be destroyed. It cannot be redeemed. From the Torah there is no ...


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You can give Tzedakah with Maaser money, as long you don't have an obligation to give that Tzedakah. Example: Someone got an Aliya. The cost of the Aliya was $180. He is not permited to deduct it from Maaser, but he can be Menadev (pledge) $180 from his Maaser when he has an aliya. You can read this and this for more info.


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Following @Yirmeyahu's lead I found my copy of the Eye of the Needle with the full copy of the article you are looking for. I scanned it here. See end of page 3 and page 4. It is not a straight interview of R Moshe Feinstein but an essay based on his call for action to yeshiva students.


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There is no maaser on non-monetary gifts according to R Tzvi Spitz, R Moshe Feinstein, R Moshe Heinemann, Chazon Ish (all four cited by R Avrohom Chaim Feuer in The tzedakah treasury pp. 136-7). Some disagree, e.g., Rabbeinu Yonah, R Shlomon Zalman Auerbach both cited by R Shimon Taub in The laws of tzedakah and maaser Others hold that only if one would ...


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I asked Rabbi David Feinstein about this once. He said the value of the gift would be the deciding factor. The following were his own examples. A small gift 20 dollars or so from your grandmother would require having Maaser taken as she wouldn't mind if you gave the couple of dollars away. However if she gave you a new car, she would not want to have given ...


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Amazon.com has 6 books on the subject of Maaser Kesafim. Maaser Kesafim and the Development of Tax Law points to the Florida Tax Review article on the subject. Halachos of Ma'aser Kesafim Apr 4, 2011 by Rabbi Yisroel Bronstein is the newest book on the Amazon page. Maaser Kesafim: Giving a Tenth to Charity says on the cover that it was edited by Cyril ...


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Tzedaka is a positive Torah commandment to give charity. The requirement amounts to a few dollars per year. Maaser is a separate but related idea. The Torah command is to give 1/10 of produce to members of the tribe of Levi. An ancient Jewish custom, or possibly Rabbinic decree, was derived from that to give 10% of one's income (regardless of source) to ...


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According to Rav Naftali Tzvi Y'huda Berlin in his commentary Ha'mek Davar, tithing is a generic term for separating some of one's wealth and giving it away - particularly to poor people. Indeed, we find people other than Ya'akov doing so elsewhere in Tana"ch. However, continues the N'tzi"v, Ya'akov specified in this case that he was giving the gift to ...


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Short answer: Yes. Long answer: Firstly, a Cohen gets Teruma, not Ma'aser, technically. (Though in Ezra's time they could [also] be given Maaser.) Secondly, all fruit grown in Eretz Yisrael is Tevel until tithed - i.e. all Terumoth and Maasrot or taken off - no matter who grows the fruit. Therefore, Cohanim may not eat Tevel, even if they want to eat ...


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The sources that I have seen would consider the inheritance as income. For example, someone gives a gift from money that had paid ma'aser on it. This is still considered complete income, because you have not paid any money for it. However, see below that you do not need to pay the ma'aser until you actually liquidate (sell) the property and obtain cash for ...


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The short answer to your first question is yes. The short answer to your second question is any income from any source. As explained in When does the obligation of Maaser money begin? ma'aser applies to any income (including an income tax refund). For example, a person getting money from tzedakah is still chayav to pay maaser on that income. That is because ...



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