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10

The Rambam (Tefilah 9:9) and Rashba (Responsum 1:183) write that Maariv's status as reshut is the reason there is no enactment for the leader to repeat the Amida aloud for those who don't know how to pray.


9

Nusach Ari (as arranged by R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi) counts it before Aleinu. Shaar Hakollel (49:7) explains that this way, the kaddish recited after Aleinu also covers the chapter of Tehillim (Psalm 67) and the verses from the Torah (Lev. 23:15-16) recited after the sefirah. Mishnah Berurah (489:2) gives another reason: this way it's done as early as ...


9

If you follow the "plag distinction", then Mincha can be davened until 1.25 relative-daylight hours before sunset, and Maariv any time after that. If you follow the "sunset distinction", then Mincha can be davened until sunset, and Maariv any time after that. I believe there are those who will allow Mincha until 11.5 or 13.5 minutes post-sunset, if you're ...


8

Two stories explaining why the Alter Rebbe included V'shomru in his siddur: R' Avraham Chaim Na'ah, in his sefer Piskei Hasidur (paragraph 128), brings a story Chassidim would tell. Levi Yitzchok of Berditchev once asked the Alter Rebbe why his custom is not to say V'shomru, if it makes such a "יריד"‬ (usually translated as fair, or parade) in heaven. The ...


7

Most of the poskim said you can't say slichot before midnight. Harav Moshe Feinstein said that it's possible in she'at hadchak - if it's very very hard to say them after midnight. You can see more details in Hebrew here.


7

The Avudraham says that we repeat Vayechulu because we are testifying that G-d created the world in 6 days and rested on the 7th. The Halacha is that testimony must have two witnesses and be said standing, and therefore Vayechulu is said together while standing. The Shulchan Aruch Harav, in his Kuntres Acharon to Orach Chaim 268:12, brings the opinion of ...


7

Various reasons are given for saying Bameh Madlikin. One is to remind people of the things that need to be done before Shabbos (including the proper wicks and oils to use); however, this is not relevant where people pray Maariv after dark anyway, as is generally the chassidic custom, and they therefore omitted it. (Aruch Hashulchan 270:2; R' Avraham Chaim ...


7

There is no Miswa of Sisit at night (see Rabenu Behaye to Numbers 15:38-39).


7

That comment of Rash"i is quoting from the G'mara (Sanhedrin 86), which derives that [although the words plainly mean "do not steal"] based on the hermeneutic device called davar halamed me'inyano. The context of capital crimes in which "lo signov" appears implies that it too must be the capital crime of kidnapping. The meaning of the pasuk is therefore ...


7

The Talmud asks this question on Brachot 33a and concludes that one still says Attah Chonantanu in Shemone Esrei even if he already recited Havdala on a cup of wine, because the Havdalah in Shemone Esrei was the original and therefore primary form of Havdala enacted. This ruling is brought in the Tur OC 294 and cited in the Mishnah Berurah there :1.


7

The Rambam (Tefilah 9:9) and Rashba (Responsum 1:183) write that Maariv's status as reshut is the reason there is no enactment for the leader to repeat the Amida aloud for those who don't know how to pray.


6

See this article (Hebrew pdf) arguing for the "need not wait" position. The Rishonim and Shulchan Aruch never said to wait; when Shulchan Aruch describes the order of prayers for Shavuos, it doesn't say anything about waiting. The note to wait appeared later (and appears in Be'er Heitev OC 494 as "the Achronim have written"), and was not agreed upon by all. ...


6

I have heard, in the name, if I recall correctly (but it's possible I don't), of Rabbi Avraham Pam (of Torah Vodaas), that there is no benefit in saying bar'chu after maariv after missing at the start, but that it's not a shem l'vatala, as one can technically say bar'chu at any time in the presence of a minyan. I ask in a followup question whether the above ...


6

Ashkenazim in Eretz Yisroel generally follow the customs of the GR"A. One of his customs was omitting Boruch HaShem Leolam as an unnecessary interruption between the blessings following the Shema and the Shemone Esre. I would cite Siddur HaGR"A as a source except that I don't have a copy to confirm. As for why it is said, this related question might ...


6

I was advised many years ago by one of my Rabbeim to skip it if, as is usually my situation, I would be unable to finish in time to start Shemoneh 'Esreh with the Tzibbur. I was also advised (when I asked someone else several months later) that it is not possible to make it up afterwards - in case you were wondering. I believe the reason for the latter ...


6

Mishnah Berurah (672:1, and in Beur Halachah ibid. ד"ה לא מאחרים) says that it depends: If you usually daven Maariv before nightfall, then prepare the menorah ahead of time, and light immediately after Maariv (so you don't miss the proper time for lighting). If you usually daven it after nightfall, then it's better to light first and then daven. In the ...


6

Yalkut Yosef (106:1) says that a woman's primary obligation for tefillah is to daven Shacharit. He permits women to daven Mincha or Arvit if they're unable to daven Shacharit. If a woman wants to daven all three tefillot, she is permitted to as well. He mentions that the reason for permitting this is that davening is asking Hashem for mercy (תפילה בקשת ...


5

Tefillah btzibur by maariv takes priority even over semichas geulah ltfillah (saying shema and its brachos before shemoneh esrei), so it obviously takes priority over "baruch Hashem..", which according to many sources should not even be said lchatchilah. I also don't think you should not start maariv early just so as to say "ברוך השם לעולם ", since then ...


5

According to Halacah Berurah 133:1 Minhag Yisrael is to say barechu after the last kaddish in Shacharit. According to the Maran Beit Yosef, and the REMA, the reason is to fulfill the obligation of people who didn't hear it already (becuase they came late). For that reason they rule not to say this barechu on Shabbat and Yom Tov, because even people who came ...


5

I want to correct and some things that appear in Alex's response above. 1) Saying/learning Bameh madlikin at the beginning of Shabbos is a minhag kadmon, an ancient minhog. That means very old, I don't know exactly, but I could see it being over one thousand years old, and maybe even a good deal longer than that. As stated above Sepharadim say it as well as ...


5

Biur Halacha 113 (hakoreah) says it is based on Divrei haYamim I 29:20: וַיֹּאמֶר דָּוִיד לְכָל-הַקָּהָל, בָּרְכוּ-נָא אֶת-יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵיכֶם; וַיְבָרְכוּ כָל-הַקָּהָל, לַיהוָה אֱלֹהֵי אֲבֹתֵיהֶם, וַיִּקְּדוּ וַיִּשְׁתַּחֲווּ לַיהוָה, וְלַמֶּלֶךְ. And David said to all the congregation: 'Now bless the LORD your God.' And all the congregation blessed the ...


5

Based on msh210's answer to Missing Barchu by Maariv that there is no benefit in saying Borchu at the end of Maariv then it is better to Daven with Kavana.


5

Congregation Etz Chayim in Toledo, Ohio says them.


5

Because sinners are lashed between minchah and maariv, and they say "Vehu Rachum" during the lashing (as per Makkot 22b), so the chazan also announces "Vehu Rachum" (Sefer HaManhig). Alternatively, because there is no korban tamid which maariv represents, but the tamid is supposed to atone, so we say "Vehu Rachum" instead (Pardes in the name of R' Eliezer ...


5

Besides what's already been mentioned, there are a few leniencies because of this, though I've never heard of your specific one. There's a much larger discussion in halakhic literature about how careful (or not) we are about davening maariv at the proper time, and the Rambam (3:7) believes that this is because Maariv is a reshut. The Beis Yosef (268:13) ...


4

There are a few permits for davening early. You always use plag as your cut-off time. (S.A./Rema O.C. 233:1) You are in a pressing situation (shaas hadechak- though that must be defined as well as whether you need to use plag). (S.A. ibid/ MB 11) It is erev shabbos, because of the mitzva of Tosefes Shabbos you can go with plag ([Magen Avraham O.C. 267:1])2 ...


4

The first five chapters of Tehillim (95-99) that we say at the beginning of Kabbalas Shabbos correspond to the first five days of the week. So when Yom Tov or Chol Hamoed coincides with Shabbos, it is inappropriate to say these "weekday-ish" chapters. (Mizmor Ledavid, on the other hand, also represents a weekday, Friday - but that is a day of preparation ...


4

Tosfot on Brachot 2a (link) say (quoting Rabbeinu Tam and the Ri) that the essential Kri'at Shma is the one in shul, even though we say Shma while it is still daytime. Rashi, on the other hand, rules that one must repeat the first section of Shma after dark, and the bedtime Kri'at Shma suffices. The Raavyah agrees with Rabbeinu Tam (according to the ...


4

The Tzlach in Brachos 5 says that Boruch Hashem L'Olam was made for a Yochid also. However the Maaseh Rav 67 says that a Yochid should not say it.


4

Bach (Orach Chaim 294) says that it refers back to מדע תורתך: through our knowledge of Hashem's Torah (besides general knowledge, אתה חונן לאדם דעת, which is equally true of Jews and non-Jews), we are enabled to perform the mitzvos of Hashem's will. On the other hand, Seder Avodas Yisrael (R. Seligman Baer) states that it is simply a copyist's or printer's ...



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