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15

This was a declaration of loyalty by the Shevatim on Yaakov's deathbed, so it's a worthwhile prayer. But since it's not a verse found in the Torah, we say it quietly (Pesachim 56a) This was a prayer of the angels so it's not appropriate for sinful mortals to say it aloud, except for on Yom Kippur From the Artscroll Yom Kippur Machzor, pp.69-70


13

OC 101 (2) and MB s.k.5 and especially 6. MB: One reason not to raise the voice is not to disturb others. Other reasons are to be like the prayer of Channa; to avoid being one of those of little faith who do not believe that HaShem hears prayers uttered quietly and to avoid being like the false prophets who cry out loud to false gods. But the important ...


13

I would suggest sitting towards the front, or somewhere near the amud. Most of the talking usually takes place towards the rear of the synagogue.


9

The Shulchan Aruch in Orach Chaim 111:1 states that there should be no Hefsek between Geula and Tefila. Although the Rama says there is no problem answering Amen the accepted custom is that we do not answer Amen after Go'al Yisroel. Both options mentioned are options that are acceptable. Some Shuls the Chazan just says the last word quitely and in some Shuls ...


9

In the Torah, the verse of Shema is followed immediately by the verse of Ve'ahavtah (Devarim 6:4-5). So in a way, BSKML"V might be a hefsek. The Tzlach says that the Gemara is telling us that by whispering it, we are not making a break between Shema and Ve'ahavtah. (see page 13 of this document for this and other explanations). [The Tzlach does not address ...


7

There is a long (20 pages) and detailed discussion of this question in the sefer Iyunei Halachos by D. Y Zvi Rabinowitz published in 2003. It includes all the sources that discuss this question and the opinions of the recent poskim. While there is no conclusive answer because there are opinions on both sides of the question, it is certainly worthwhile to ...


7

The custom of reciting Avinu Malkeinu repetitively by the chazzan and congregation is brought in Mateh Efrayim (תרב סי"ג), without any explanation. [The Mateh Efrayim himself writes to begin from א"מ קרע, however the Ktzey Hamateh at the bottom brings the custom to start from א"מ החזירנו בתשובה]. The only reason I could find is mentioned in שער יששכר מאמר ...


7

In the Men's side as close to the Rabbi as possible.


7

You shouldn't try to "out do" the loud davener since that would just disturb even more people. Re how to correct the person. This is the category of rebuke that is mentioned in Lev 19:17. The Rabbis and the sources spend considerable time examining how to properly rebuke a person. Some ideas in reference to your situation: I'd do it privately with the ...


6

In Rambam's text of the siddur (printed after the various laws of prayer, blessings, and the like, in the back of his code), he writes: The chazan says each one calls the other, and the congregation answers holy holy holy ... the chazan says by David, your holy anointed one, and the congregation replies G-d shall reign forever. And all the parts that ...


6

We learn from Chana not to raise our voices for tefillah. (One reason given is that we imply that Hashem canot hear us otherwise.) See, for example, Aruch haShulchan 101:2. Shema is not tefillah, it is a declaration.


6

Harav Musafi Shelit"a says in his lecture (Ana Bechoah) that the entire point is to have the special intentions while reciting the words. However, the Haye Adam doesn't hold of people in that generation (Kal Wahomer now) intending on the Arizal's intention. Of course, as the Ben Ish Hai writes in his Sefer Emunat Atich, before intending the Kabalistic ...


5

This passuk is said outloud, because you say it outloud during the Megilah reading. http://www.moreshet.co.il/web/shut/print.asp?id=121711&kod=&modul=15&codeClient=58 According to R. Shmuel Pinchas Gelbard, some also have the custom and saying "Cain Tihyeh Lanu", "yes we have" after this line as a prayer to have more light in the upcoming week, ...


5

I personally feel very strongly that nothing should be done. I was once guilty of this about 12 years ago (only once, I believe, though I could be wrong). The reason I was guilty of it was that I was so wrapped up in my Tefillah, with such focused concentration, that I simply didn't realize I was being too loud. Unfortunately, the rebuke I received made me ...


5

Chabad custom is to say it at regular volume, see here. The halachic sources cited there include Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim 66:7, as well as Shulchan Aruch 111 (as mentioned by Gershon)


4

Rabbeinu Yehudah Hachasid writes in Sefer Chasidim (reish nun alef) that the job of the Shaliach Tzibbur is to wait until most of the kehal has finished one paragraph and then he starts the next. He says that what we do is a mistake that was propagated by arrogant mishoririm (chazzanim) who wanted to be heard. The correct hanhagah still exists by some groups ...


4

Not sure. The artscroll "diamond" is believed to be their modification of the crosses found in ... other groups' prayer books. Printed after the Rambam's Halachot of Prayer are his text of the siddur, which includes some notes of his on what the chazzan says out loud in kedusha. When it comes to Psukei D'Zimra, you really don't need a chazzan anyhow, ...


4

I don't have a source offhand, but I remember learning that it is connected to the idea that we don't publicly announce our sins between man and G-d, and it is considered Chutzpah if we do publicly announce our sins that we sinned against G-d. (Rambam Hilchot Teshuva 2:5 - english). Since we are confessing our sins, we do so quietly. Taamei HaMinhagim, ...


4

When there is a Zimmun, what is supposed to happen is the leader recites the entire Bentching aloud on the group's behalf and everyone else listens with the intent to fulfill their obligation and replies Amen at the relevant places. If one is unsure of his ability to pay attention to the leader the whole time (this is common), he should recite in an ...


3

The only source that I could find is Likutei Maharich volume2 - page 82 where he mentions that our Minhag is that all those who hear Havdalla say Layehudim out loud. He does not give a reason for this Minhag.


3

There are a few places where it "matters", but in most cases, it's just the custom (not even a minhag per se) that people follow. Some places where the order and timing actually matters: The end of the shema: the chazan repeats [not waits and says later] hashem elokeichem emes [machlokes whether the Chazan should say emes the first time [in which case the ...


3

Ralbag explains that the reason for the silence was so the inhabitants not hear them. Thus, presumably, they could speak quietly, and the "וְלֹא יֵצֵא מִפִּיכֶם דָּבָר" was overly emphatic in order to make sure they didn't speak loudly. (Note that that command to be quiet was not noted as having been fulfilled, and I have no reason to think that the entire ...


3

Maimonides's commentary on Avos explains that when someone has a lot of words he will sin, after all, as it's impossible that among his words won't be one word that's inappropriate to say. He goes on to list five categories of speech: mitzva speech (like Torah study), forbidden speech (like false testimony), inappropriate but not outright forbidden ...


3

See the following explanation of the Abarbenel who unites the explanation of the Talmud with the explanation of the Midrash and resolves your question. He explains that "baruch shem..." refers to a deeper understanding of the unity of God. This is why it is reserved for angels and Moshe did not want to say it in the Torah. However, Yaackov, speaking ...


3

In the laws of Rosh Hashana The Mechaber mentions that even though a whole year one should not daven with a raised voice on Rosh Hashana it is permitted since people are davening from a Machzor and the noise wont disturb them. The source is PisKei Tosfos in Rosh HaShana. Not the Gemorah itself. That being said the Mishna Brura says that still one should ...


2

This isn't exactly an answer, but there are places where the shali'ach tzibur, by all rights, should really NOT read aloud. For example, in the middle of the "paragraph" Vay'varech David, at the words ומצאת את לבבו נאמן לפניך, which is the middle of a pasuk and therefore not the end of anything.


2

Shema is said aloud in unison and you do not disturb others when you do it, however if everyone was saying their part of Shemona Esrei out loud there would be no way to concetrate. In addition at Shemona Esrei we request personal requests, which is different by everyone and would be quiet confusing (and maybe a bit uncomfortable) if said out loud.


2

I once heard (I do not remember from who) that on Shabbos and Yom Tov since the Davening is done at a slower pace - in general people are holding along with the Chazan - and thus it is unecessary to say the Pesukim out loud. It is also very possible that the Chazan is saying it out loud, however as there are often more people in Shul on Shabbos/Yom Tov and ...


2

The minhag at my Sephardic community is to say Ga'al Yisra'el out loud, then say "Ad-nai" (as part of "... sefatai tiftah...") in an audible undertone so that the members of the tzibbur would start their amidah right away.



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