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16

According to the Shulchan Aruch (YD 114:1) it is forbidden to drink beer in the same place as non-Jews do, i.e. bars. This is not a kashrus concern, but rather is forbidden out of concern that Jews will come to socialize overly much with non-Jews and come to eat with them. The Rama there writes that the custom in ashkenaz was to be lenient on honey and ...


13

In general, I wouldn't post just a quote, but it so perfectly addressed the question... From Hayom Yom (29th of first Adar), written/compiled by the Lubavitcher Rebbe: In responding to L'chayim there are two versions: L'chayim Tovim Ul'Shalom, "for good life, and for peace." The reason for this blessing is that the first time drinking wine is ...


11

Rambam Hilchos De'os 5:3 ג. כשהחכם שותה יין אינו שותה אלא כדי לשרות אכילה שבמעיו וכל המשתכר הרי זה חוטא ומגונה ומפסיד חכמתו ואם נשתכר בפני עמי הארץ הרי זה חילל את השם ואסור לשתות יין בצהרים ואפילו מעט אלא אם היה בכלל האכילה שהשתיה שהיא בכלל האכילה אינה משכרת ואין נזהרין אלא מיין שלאחר המזון.‏ My loose translation: A Chacham only drinks wine ...


10

Nitei Gavriel Nesuin 2 - 80:21:38 says that the source for saying L'Chaim on wine is Sefer Hapardes L'Rashi, Ravia Brachos 120, Tanya Rabsi 24, Bach Orach Chaim 174. The reason is that since wine brought a curse on the world when Noach drank and cursed Canaan therefore we say L'Chaim when we drink it. He also mentions in the name of the Baal Shem Tov not to ...


9

ABSOLUTELY. DO NOT DRINK IF IT IS MEDICALLY CONTRAINDICATED!! NEVER EVER EVER!! Immediately after the statement about "obligation to drink on Purim", the Gemara tells a tale of one rabbi who got drunk and very nearly killed someone. Most rabbis say that's just a cautionary note to moderate your drinking, but the Baal HaMaor says the Gemara is refuting the ...


9

I asked this specific question of the Kof-K many years ago. They indicated that it is not a problem. I called them on the phone, so I have no documentation, however, they referred to the Nodah B'yehudah. The isinglas and sediment is never intended to stay in the final product and is removed. The answer was very quick, with no need for research. It struck ...


8

Normally kiddush requires a "reviis", which we'll call 3.3 fluid ounces. Kiddush (for shabbos day, as well as havdalah) may be recited on any chamar medina, "beverage of the land, which you'd serve a respected guest." In addition to wine/grape juice, this certainly includes: Beer (found in the Gemara) Apple juice (This appears in the Artscroll "Radiance ...


7

The Shulchan Aruch Harav writes (597:1) (based on Rishonim and Tur/Shulchan Aruch): ומצוה לאכול ולשתות ולשמוח בראש השנה כמ"ש בסי' תקפ"א אמנם לא יאכלו כל שבעם למען לא יקילו ראשם ותהיה יראת ה' על פניהם My translation: It is a mitzvah to eat and drink and rejoice on Rosh Hashana, as is explained in Siman 581. However one should not eat to full ...


7

Quite honestly this is an area where you need to consult whichever Posek you rely upon. My basic reasoning for that is as follows. I received semicha from the Israeli Rabbinute 10yrs ago, and soon after found myself in Kosher industry working for the OK. I haven't been actively working in it for the last 5yrs, but I still receive the various trade ...


6

Being someone who was involved with the Budweiser Clamato problem in the Summer of 2008, I highly recommend getting the back issue of Kashrus Magazine that dealt with the problem of Chelada (one of the funnier results was hechsher on clam juice) and the general question of beer and kashrus. In the meantime, even the cRc says that flavored beers need ...


6

My understanding is if there's flavoring, it will appear somewhere on the label, and if you see it on the label, it could be problematic. (Occasionally the flavoring itself is just herbs and not a kosher problem, but there's no way for a consumer to tell what flavoring is in his "flavored" beer.) Here's the US Government saying that if you add anything ...


6

As most kosher agencies will tell you, any plain, unflavored, domestic beer poses no kosher problems. The ingredients are straightforward and all kosher, bishul akum isn't an issue (that's another topic), and the prohibition on non-Jewish wine was only on grape products. As discussed elsewhere, you are allowed to use a clean non-kosher cup for cold food ...


6

I heard the following: Wine and frankincense were administered to a person condemned to the death penalty Sanhedrin 43a This is an association between wine and death. So we say when we drink wine, L'chaim "to Life."


5

I asked them and received the following reply from Rabbi Moshe D Gutnick (with permission to post here): In NZ all ethanol is produced from whey and is Dairy. Therefore all ethanol based alcoholic beverages such as Vodka produced in NZ must be considered dairy. Beer was also included in that as a precaution. However it is now quite clear that none of the ...


4

By Googling for pear cider kosher, I found a bunch of promising possibilities. Here are two apparently certified by Kosher Australia. (I'm not familiar with that agency, but it's endorsed by R' Eidlitz, for what it's worth.) There seem to be quite a few other options uncovered by that search. Lechaim!


4

Note: This answer was penned when the question was only "What is the minimum Shi'ur (volume) of a cup required for making Kiddush on liquor? Is there a smaller amount required than there is for wine?", without the "What is the minimum Shi'ur of the liquor that one is required to consume?" part. This is the subject of a dispute. The default halacha is that ...


4

Rav Shmuel Kamentsky holds one can use anything (kovetz Halachos perek 18:11). He discusses many sources including the Tur, Shulchan Aruch, Chayei Adam, and more poskim. He also cites the Aruch Hashulchan 695:5 with a savorah of one could use יי"ש but shouldn't for other reasons. He also discusses Minchas Elazar 695 בשבילי דוד and the קהילות יעקב.


4

The Gemara says (Megila 7b) "Hayab Inish LeBisumi Ad Delo Yada...- a man must get drunk until he doesn't know..." However, in that statement it doesn't mention wine. Wine is usually the methodology used but I don't see any Mamashut to it being MeIkar HaDin (i.e. not MeChuyav). One of my Rabbanim (who I was told is a Posek) says wine is unnecessary and that ...


4

Although the Beit Yosef (OC 597) quotes the Kol Bo that some have the custom of fasting on Rosh HaShanah, most rishonim hold that fasting is inappropriate and that one should eat, drink, and rejoice on Rosh HaShanah, and the Shulchan Aruch paskens accordingly (with the caveat that the rejoicing should be tempered by reverence for the day). This accords with ...


4

Tif'eret Yosef OC 14 asks your specific question, concluding that the "bread" would be considered pat habaah bikisanin and not get a hamotzi under ordinary circumstances. (I do not expect this ruling is universally agreed upon. Compare, for instance, his reasoning to Aruch haShulchan OC 158:6 and note the ill-defined boundary in Mishna Berura 168 sk 33. See ...


4

I think the most succinct words of wisdom on this subject are from Kitzur Shulchan Aruch: However, one who has a weak constitution, and also one who knows himself, that by this (excessive drinking) he would treat lightly, Heaven forbid, some commandment, a blessing, or a prayer, or will come, Heaven forbid, to irreverence, it is best (for him) not to get ...


4

A primary source would be the מדרש תנחומה in פרשת פקודי at סימן ב העת שחוקרין העדים על העבירה שאדם עושה, יוצאין הסנהדרין וכל ישראל עמם לרחוב העיר, ומוציאין לשם לאיש שהוא מחוייב סקילה או אחד מארבע מיתות בית דין, ויוצאין שנים מהם או שלשה הגדולים מהם ודורשין לעדים. וכששבין מלחקור, אומר להם, סברי מרנן. והם אומרים, אם לחיים לחיים, ואם למיתה למיתה. אם הוא ...


4

Actually the answer to your question is implied in your question. Your are consuming fermented grains which is the definition of chametz. Just because you then dissolve the fermented grain in a liquid does not make it permissible. The "cheekful" reference is for liquid food, as is the reference to Rvi'is. A good summary WHICH FOODS ARE CHAMETZ? is: ...


4

Most beer produced today is produced from barley. The barley is soaked in water to malt. Barley is one of the 5 major grains which become Chometz by exposure to water. Regarding the amount of Chometz that is forbidden, Chometz is forbidden B'Mashehu (even a minute amount). However there are grain-free beers that are Kosher for Pesach.


2

Since you state that you do not keep Shabbos, and you state that you want to give it to your 'kosher friends', implying that you do not necessarily keep kosher, there is another problem. Even if you had made this during the week, it would be the same as if you had cooked food in your kitchen, using your own utensils. Even if the food was bought from a kosher ...


2

See here. Kosher and Sherry Casks Rabbi Pinchas Teitz of Elizabeth, NJ, first reported in 1949 that there may be sherry wine in blended whisky – which would obviously create a problem for observant Jews who are also whisky lovers. It would then follow that any single malt Scotch that is exclusively matured or finished in sherry casks would ...


2

Whey in general is problematic: With the increased demand for liquid whey, the dairy industry has achieved alternative methods of recapturing whey. Some of these methods may present serious halachic issues. Today whey is retrieved also from Swiss cheese and Mozzarella cheese productions. The milk curd in Swiss cheese productions is cooked in temperatures ...


1

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein was addressing blended whiskey, but the issues are basically the same with regards to a sherry-cask scotch as far as I know. Rabbi Feinstein said it was allowable, but not preferable; he personally made reasonable attempts to avoid such a product (as a chumrah) , and gave his blessing to those who would make a product certified as free ...


1

No, beer is not a "davar charif." Hops are somewhat bitter, I suppose you could potentially argue if they're called charif, but the overall product, beer, is not that pungent. (Similarly, some out there treat mayonnaise as davar charif because one of the ingredients on the label is lemon juice! But the product mayonnaise is not sharp-tasting! My father asked ...



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