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8

The Shulchan Aruch in Orach Chayim 676:1 says that you should recite it on the second night after the regular two b'rachos. The same goes for any subsequent night if it is the first time you are lighting this year. But there are two exceptions to this rule: The first is if he knew on the first night that he was not going to light his own candles, and he ...


8

Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 298:3-4 says: The person needs to be close enough to the fire to potentially benefit from it, should he so choose (It is described there as being able to sort money by the light of the torch). The Mishna Berurah there (S"K 13) says that if one who is listening wants to fulfill his obligation, he too must be that close. Our ...


8

Try this article at Chabad.org, which quotes (in translation) the classic sources on the subject. Briefly, it's the idea that Hashem first created the ten sefiros as the "world of Tohu," as independent entities, where each one is is exclusively "thus and no other way" - i.e., chesed ("kindness") is pure chesed, gevurah ("severity") is pure gevurah, etc.; ...


7

Commenting on the Shulchan Aruch's "One should always set his table on motzae Shabas to escort Shabas", Mishna B'rura 300:3 writes: And for the same reason, some are accustomed to having more lamps on motzae Shabas than during the week, and also are accustomed to saying poems and songs after havdala.


7

This ceremony is an American phenomena, it was invented by caterers and is the only of many creative ceremonies to have "stuck" from the early days of American Bar Mitzvah celebrations in ceremonial halls. You will find it across the spectrum of Jewish groups (including some Orthodox) but will generally only find it in ceremonial halls and not in synagogues ...


7

This can be found in Rashi, Onkelos, and Ibn Ezra. To cite a post about this on Balashon: The word tzohar (or tsohar) appears only here in the Tanach and there are a number of explanations for the meaning: window (Onkelos, Rashi, Ibn Ezra) - based on tsohorayim צהרים - noon. The light of noon is compared to the light entering the ark via the window. ...


6

Based on the Shulchan Aruch 298:3-4 and the Mishna Berura there, the main "staring" is to ascertain that you have benefited from the light. The Shiur for this is the light enabling one to distinguish between 2 similar coins from separate countries. Since seeing the difference between light nails and darker skin is a similar shiur of light, and there is ...


6

Any reason this isn't analogous to winding up a mechanical watch that's currently ticking (on-time)? The watch case was discussed by R' Shlomo Zalman Auerbach IIRC; it was considered "fixing" the watch and prohibited. Heard in Rabbi Heinemann's discussion of Sabbath-mode ovens.


6

I seem to recall that they are also "neshamah licht" (candles in memory of the departed) for King David, who died on Shabbos afternoon (and who is associated with the melaveh malkah meal).


6

Two answers from http://ohr.edu/ask_db/ask_main.php/106/Q1/: In the name of Rabbi Yaakov Yisrael Kanievsky (the 'Steipler'): There's an angel whose name is the same as the sound produced when you blow out with force. According to Kabbalistic tradition, it's improper to make use of the names of holy angels. Many people, therefore, extinguish candles by hand ...


6

Your question was asked of the Ohr Somayach "Ask the Rabbi" who answers about three things: 1) Extinguishing the havdalah candle immediately after havdalah 2) Extinguishing it in wine 3) Not blowing out candles in general On 2, he says, ""Wine spilling like water," says the Talmud, "is a sign of blessing." In order to start the week off right, we ...


6

Based on Shulchan Aruch Harav, Section 624:4 - 624:5. Just like on Shabbos, after Yom Kippur we make a Bracha on fire since we were not permitted to use fire before, and it is like a new entity to us. After Shabbos we may use new fire because this is how fire was initially brought into the world after Shabbos Adam took two stones and made fire and made the ...


5

Mishnah Berurah (672:1, and in Beur Halachah ibid. ד"ה לא מאחרים) says that it depends: If you usually daven Maariv before nightfall, then prepare the menorah ahead of time, and light immediately after Maariv (so you don't miss the proper time for lighting). If you usually daven it after nightfall, then it's better to light first and then daven. In the ...


5

I hope that this is more helpful. I am a rabbi in Birmingham. When we have tornadoes which knock out power we recommend people use light sticks. There is no heat generated, the light is a simple chemical reaction. breaking the inner glass is not mekalkel as what you are doing is not destructive it is in fact constructive. Think of cutting a cucumber for ...


5

My mother has the custom of leaving two candles lit, either which were the actual ones used for Havdalah or lit from the Havdalah candle. Her mother called them "Shulem Bayis Lichten". I do not yet know of a written source, but with minhagim I believe that a mimetic source should suffice. (Minhag Yisrael Torah) As far as the reasons, I have theories. ...


5

I use strands of white holiday lights like these or these (often cheap on December 26!), powered by a heavy-duty extension cord that is plugged in in the garage, with foil plastic and electrical tape around plugs that are outside (the second strand plugged into the first, etc). I've had no safety problems since starting to wrap the plugs; before I did ...


4

Despite the fact that everyone seems to assume you light from left to right (don't take my word for it; try a simple Google search!) there actually is a difference of opinion. The following information is taken directly from Halachipedia (with some very minor editing by me for formatting purposes): Maharik (Responsa 183, cited by Beit Yosef 676:5) ...


4

I used to use a product similar to (or the same as) the one recommended by Sam. I think I once had an incident where the metal base got hot enough to damage the cup, so now, I always put water at the bottom of the cup, before I put in the oil. Anyway, the cups hold much more than enough oil to be lit for the requisite duration. More recently, I've been ...


4

אליה רבה תרי:ד מצאתי בספר אמרכל מצינו בתרגום מגילה במלשינות של המן, בליל צומא רבה מדליקין נרות סכום בניהם סכום אבהתהון ע"כ The Elya Rabba quotes the Amarkal who quotes a targum on Esther (I can't seem to find it in our targum) that the Jews lit candles "according to the number of their ancestors". I'm guessing the context is regarding Yom Kippur but ...


4

http://www.chabad.org.il/Questions/Item.asp?ArticleID=588&CategoryID=68 The source for lighting a candle for a departed soul - is from Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi - who authored the Mishnayos - who commanded his family to leave a candle lit. Rabbenu Bachya explains that the soul has a sublime pleasure from candlelight.


4

20th c. rabbi and legal decisor Yisrael Meir Kagan wrote in the Mishna B'rura (Orach Chayim 676) that the guiding principle in lighting the candles is never to pass one's hand past a candle without lighting it since that would constitute passing up an opportunity to perform a mitzva. So, assuming a right-handed person standing slightly to the left of and ...


4

http://www.thehalacha.com/attach/Volume3/SpecialIssue.pdf In places where it is hard to check one may use a flashlight. (Refer to Natei Gavriel 1:17:19, Chazzon Ovadia Pesach 1:page 138:2:footnote 13 in depth, Otzer Ha’halochos page 116:12, Horav Eider Shlita’s sefer on Hilchos Pesach page 86, Shevet Ha’Levi 1:136:page 137, Shevus Yitzchok Pesach ...


4

This year, I ran an outdoor-rated extension cord (not hard to come by) out a window (through the already-insulated gap where an air conditioner is) to the sukkah and plugged in a five-bulb lighting string, also outdoor-rated. I used yellow anti-bug CFLs, again outdoor-rated. When I've asked in Home Depot about plugging things in outside, I've gotten the ...


4

TorahLab give the following explanation: On Yom Kippur we are celebrating the fact that we hadn’t used fire all day. In this way Yom Kippur is different from all other Jewish holidays, on which the use of fire is permitted. So it is therefore appropriate to use a flame that had ‘rested’ all day. It had been burning before Yom Kippur, had not been used ...


4

Rav Moshe Mintz, a posek in Ner Israel, told me that you can ideally use any light that can be focused in one area (as opposed to the sunlight or the main light in a room, which lights up the entire room), as the purpose of the candle at night is to contrast with the dark in the rest of the room.


3

Ben Ish Hai Pinehas Shana Bet 18 (quoting the Arizal's Shaar Ruach Hakodesh), Shalme Hayim 499, Zivhe Sedek 116:74, and HaBayit HaYehudi 10:29:10.


3

Aside from the chemical reaction (about which I don't know whether that would be permissible on Shabbos), there is also the fact that in activating it you're breaking the inner glass tube. At the very least, if we consider this מקלקל (a destructive act), then I would think it would be prohibited Rabbinically.


3

From what I understand, it does depend on where you live. An integral part of lighting Chanuka candles is "advertising the miracle" (pirsumei nisa). For many years this was accomplished by lighting outdoors in a public place where many people gathered. Due to religious persecution at certain points in history, this practice was almost entirely stopped. ...


3

The Ketzos HaShulchan Siman 29:2 and the Badei HaShulchan Siman 29:2 explains that we keep a Ner Tamid lit for Kovod Shomayim and that it is a Zecher L'Mikdash where there always remained one candle burning on the Western side (Ner Ma'aravi). Regarding having more than one light today - in the Shuls I frequent that is not the case. I have seen some Shuls ...



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