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11

There is an argument between different Rabbis: Igros Moshe says that one is prohibited to invite someone to a synagogue if the only way one will be able to get there is by car. He says that there are several issues: Lifnei Iver (he is like one who places a stumbling block). He says this applies even if the people whom he invites live close enough to the ...


7

Rav Aharon Lichtenstein discusses the issue here and quotes Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach as permitting, provided one let them know that sleeping arrangements in the area can be provided. Rav Lichtenstein himself tends to agree, especially if there is a Jewish-educational aspect involved.


6

The first thing I would do in that situation is to try to provide the halachic options. For example, in setting up the lunch, I would order in some kosher food and set up a separate table for it, making sure it's well-labelled. This might be enough to entice the people who don't keep kosher to eat the kosher food, because they didn't have to make special ...


5

In all the cases specified there is no Lifnei Iver. The Gemara (Avodah Zarah 14a) says: Said Abaye; We should be particular not to [place a stumbling-block] before [the blind] but we need not be so particular as to avoid placing it before one who may place it before the blind. The simple explanation of this Gemara is that Lifnei Iver does not apply ...


3

Since a man is prohibited to stare at a woman, dressing immodestly in front of men provides them with the tool to sin, let alone what the stare can lead to (improper thoughts, etc.) That seems almost self-evident, especially if she is doing it "to be seen". In other words doing it to draw attention to herself. [I guess what is self evident to me isn't so ...


3

I know of a mechanic that has many non religious workers. He has instituted that no one is allowed to bring his own lunch, and he supplies lunch daily for all his workers. In addition he has them wash and then Bentch together. (no one stands with a gun to their head, it is done and those that want to, participate) I know this does not exactly answer your ...


3

Rabbi Yitchok Zilberstain brings down from Rav Elyashiv Zatzal that you should immediately let everyone know.


2

According to Igros Moshe Chelek 1 Siman 98 and Chelek 4 Siman 71 it would not be allowed.


2

See Aruch HaShulchan YD 117:27 where he makes clear that people can rely on the kula to operate a store in which they sell some non-kosher products, since the majority of their business is with kosher things, and the only reason they are selling the non-kosher things also is because they would lose business if they didn't have these things available also. ...


2

Note that the Minchas Chinuch says that literally placing a stumbling block before a blind person is not a (Biblical, at least) violation of this avera (according to what I've read in the "Torah Lodaas" weekly sheet by Rabbi Matis Blum; I didn't look up the Minchas Chinuch myself). However, the Meshech Chochma disagrees, holding that placing a stumbling ...


2

Stam yeinam is not actually assur because of an actual concern of biblical yayin nesech since we do not actually assume they will use it for avoda zara. It's just a gezeira d'rabanan to avoid excessive familiarity that would lead to intermarriage and an ultimate abandonment of the mitzvos. So lo sitein michshol should not apply in your case (of non-mevushal ...


2

Oz Nidbaru 7:65:2 says that one may throw invitations with Pesukim on them into the garbage, so long they are wrapped in something.


1

In addition to loewian's answer, there seems to be no prohibition for a Noahide to consume wine used as libation for idolatry. See Pesahim 73a and Turei Even to Hagigah 13a s.v. ein mosrin, cited by Gilyon ha-Shas Pesahim ibid.


1

The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains (Sichos Kodesh 5744 Parshas Kedoshim - although I think it was edited and printed in Lukutei Sichos somewhere) the reason that Rashi doesn't interpret the verse literally is that the literal understanding is already forbidden by the issur of וכי יפתח איש בור which shows that it is ossur to be a mazik, so here it would be ...


1

Partial answer: There is no Shabbos problem of sending it even if it is already Shabbos where the recipient is (see last paragraph here).


1

Hashavat Aveida, and indeed all mitzvot that are between man and his fellow man, is only applicable where the subject would benefit. In a case where returning an object would harm the person more than benefiting him, there is no mitzva. Perhaps this is the rationale behind R. Chaim Kanievsky's ruling. For example, if storage costs charged to the owner ...


1

The Rambam (Aveidah 11:13, also see Choshen Mishpat 263:1) writes: "The following rule applies when a person finds a sack or a large basket. If he is a sage or a respected elder, who would not usually carry such articles himself, he is not obligated to concern himself with them. "He should judge his status in the following way. If the article were his own ...


1

While the rules were written in the way that they were for a reason, that reason doesn't necessarily mean that people actually placed stumbling blocks before the blind, that could just be a concise and precise way for the Torah to express the idea of misleading someone. (I wrote about that here and here.) The reason for these kinds of phrases may be to ...


1

I think that it is fair to say that actually placing a physical stumbling block in front of blind people is not something that used to happen. If this had been a regular occurance, then the negative mitzvah not to do it would be interpreted as prohibiting a very specific action that the people might otherwise do. The next time they wanted to trip up someone ...


1

In Yoreh Deah 151:4, the Rama quotes the Mordechai that it is permissible to sell objects of idol worship to a non-Jew if the non-Jew can obtain objects of idol worship through other means anyway. He also quotes a few other sources that disagree, though he writes that the practice is to be lenient. The Shach (s"k 6 and quoted in Beer Heitev s"k 5) writes ...



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