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11

The Torah made it very clear (Deuteronomy 12:5-18) that once the Jews would reach "the rest and inheritance ...the place G-d will choose" (i.e. the Temple in Jerusalem), that would be the place for sacrificial service. The Second Temple was destroyed by the Romans around the year 70, and thus there haven't been sacrifices since. Thus, many of the roles of ...


11

Shulchan Aruch O"C 135:12: עיר שכולה כהנים אם יש ישראל אחד ביניהם אותו ישראל קורא ראשון מפני דרכי שלום וכל שאין בהם ישראל כדי סיפוקם או שאין שם ישראל כלל קורא כהן אחר כהן שאין שם משום פגם שהכל יודעים שאין שם אלא כהנים והוא הדין לעיר שכולה לוים:‏ A city in which all are Kohanim, If there is one Yisrael among them, he's called up first because of ...


10

If there is no levi, a bechor (firstborn) should do so. If there aren’t any bechorim, then the kohein should wash his own hands (M.B. 128 sk. 22).


8

A convert is ben/bat Avraham (v'Sarah) -- not ben/bat the adoptive parents and also not ben/bat the birth parents, halachically speaking. If he doesn't even get his adoptive father's name, it seems unlikely that he would get his tribe.


8

Jacob had twelve sons, and on spiritual matters, we count those twelve. With Levi as one and Joseph as one. (That's for instance what you'd find on the High Priest's decision breastplate.) On financial/land matters, however, Levi did his own thing, and Joseph got a double portion as his sons Ephraim and Menashe. For instance, there were spaces for twelve ...


7

As a Levi, I pour the water in a slow continuous stream into the middle of the sink, and allow the Kohen to follow his minhag of whether to alternate hands or move each hand in and out of the stream several times. I can report that different Kohanim do different things.


6

They are neither a Cohen nor a Levi nor a Yisrael. They are a Ger. Gerim are a different status as evidenced by the list of different ancestral statuses in the Mishna in Kiddushin 4:1, and by certain rules pertaining to them such as their ability to marry a mamzer, and their inability to marry a Cohen (Rambam Issurei Biah 15:7 and 18:3).


6

The source for this is in Gittin 59b: כהן אחר כהן לא יקרא משום פגמו של ראשון Translation: kohen should not read after kohen because this implies a blemish of the first kohen.


6

He certainly can. All that needs to happen is to have everyone else in the room be of the same lineage as himself, or at most only one member of a different lineage (Shulchan Aruch OC 135:12). Alternatively, if all he is interested in doing is reading it and not neccesarily getting the Aliyah, he can serve as the Baal Keriya for the Haftarah if the minyan is ...


6

Mishna Berura 135:34 says that on a fast day a Kohain or Levi should not get the Aliyah of Maftir. I do not see any reason why Yom Kippur should be different than other fast days.


5

Rabbi Ovadia Yosef (Yalkut Yosef Mo'adim pg. 101) rules that a Cohen may be called up for Maftir Yonah: Kitzur Yalkut Yosef 622:9: כהן שזכה בקניית עליית מפטיר של מנחת יום הכפורים, כי נכספה וגם כלתה נפשו לקרוא בהפטרת יונה, יש לו על מה שיסמוך שיעלה לעליית מפטיר, אחר שקראו כהן ולוי. ובלבד שיאמר השליח צבור, ואף על פי שהוא כהן יעמוד למפטיר A Cohen ...


5

I believe the Cohen washes his own. If I recall correctly, the Gemara just talks about how Cohanim wash. Having someone else do it is the Zohar.


5

Answer: Levites: 4%, Priests: 4%. A scientific article which deals with the genetics of priests and Levites quotes a book from 1999 (not available for reading online) which estimates Levites and priests each at 4% of the general Jewish population. Source: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000292970763626X#bbib6 Referenced book: "The genetic ...


5

They would become ישראלים, that is, neither a kohen nor a levi. Converts to Judaism cannot merge into a family: all are created equal.


5

The Babylonian Talmud, in Tractate Chullin (24a), notes this contradiction in starting age and reconciles it by saying that Levites entered training at 25 and began to serve at 30. (From this we learn that if we don't see signs of progress with a student in 5 years, we don't expect him to succeed.) However, this restriction applied only to the mishkan, the ...


4

It's actually not so much because of practicality, but because the prerequisites for Yovel are that all Jews are living in the land of Israel, and each tribe in their designated territory. (So even if all of the land were under Jewish control, there's still the fact that almost no one knows what tribe they're from. See the discussion in the comments here.) ...


4

It's based on the Zohar Nasso 146b and is noted as an old minhag in both Ashkenaz and Sefarad by the Beit Yosef (OC 128). In the Shulchan Aruch he codifies this practice in OC 128:6. It seems the reasoning in the Zohar is that the Kohanim need to somehow up their kedusha level by washing as a preparation for the blessing, and by having a Levi, who has his ...


4

In high school, I had a rebbe (Rabbi Horowitz) who said that he was a Korach Levi, part of a group that traced their lineage to Korach. And that they referred to the (somewhat misunderstood) Korach as 'the Heilige zeideh Korach'.


3

The Gemara simply talks about a kohen washing hands. It's the Zohar that says a Levi should do it. If no Levi is available, the job is given to a firstborn; if no firstborn is available, the kohen just washes his own hands. I strongly suspect that if the Levi doesn't want to do it, just ignore him and go find a firstborn. (Conflict-of-interest disclaimer ...


3

Per the Sefer Keser Kehuna 10:4 a minor Levi may only wash together with the adult Levi the Kohain. This is based on the Mordechai in Megila Perek 3 #815.


3

The Rambam writes (Hilchot Klei HaMikdash VeHaOvdim Bo 3:12) regarding the division of the Levite families: שמואל הרואה ודויד המלך, חילקו הלויים לעשרים וארבע משמרות; ועובד משמר בכל שבת. וכל אנשי המשמר, מחלק אותם ראש המשמר לבתי אבות; וכל יום מימי השבת, עובדים בו אנשים ידועים. וראשי האבות מחלקין אלו העובדים ביום שלהן, איש איש על עבודתו.‏ Samuel ...


3

The Persian community (mostly Shirazi) absorbed by Baltimore contains a high fraction of Cohanim and very few Leviim.


3

Rashi means to say that the Leviim were not killed over the forty years. It often happens that Rashi will quote the 'wrong' pasuk to simplify his point; what he is really referring to is the count at the beginning of Sefer Bamidbar, where indeed the count is described as a census of soldiers (or יוצא צבא "those who go out with the army"). This is evident ...


3

The Torah lists off the names of the tribes in multiple places. Every time, there are 12: either because Levi is counted, and Yosef is counted as one tribe, or because Levi is not counted, and in those cases Efraim and Menashe are both counted. Thus, we say '12' because that's clearly what the Torah is trying to do - emphasize that however you count the ...


2

Djerba has almost all kohanim.


2

It seems that according to Divrei Hayamim, chapter 23 that the leviim were broken up into 24 groups each with their own "Rosh Avot". It is hard to tell if they assigned themselves, or were assigned based on the Kohen in charge of such things. However, it seems strongly implied that it was the Cohen who gave orders to the Leviim who were not singing or on ...


2

In regard to the "af-al-pi shehu kohen", we are Ashkenazim and my husband is a Cohen. Some years ago we spent Shabbat in Venice, Italy. By the time they got around to asking my husband who he was, they had already passed Cohen. So they said, "No problem." They called him up as Chamishi, with the addendum of "af-al-pi..." So here's a case of not even ...


2

Tamid 27a states explicitly that the leviim guarded on the outside so they could sit down.



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