Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

It is possible for a statement to be a relevant statement of fact, without having to be a statement of fault. This sometimes depends on the audience. In the original poster's example, it is likely that many gentile readers would appreciate the chance to support a restaurant (whether kosher or not) that supports Israel, but would find it embarrassing to ...


6

To answer the question of the title, normally one would not be allowed to speak ill of someone even if it is or combined with speaking of that person's merits. However, in this case the newspaper is allowed to speak of this restaurant owner's lack of kashrus, because it is already a well know fact (see Sefer Chafetz Chaim, Klal 4, Beer Mayim Chaim 41) as ...


4

One source can be found in Sefer Chafetz Chayim, in the introduction, where he lists positive commandments that one may transgress when speaking Lashon Hara (Sif Zayin, pages 70-71 of Volume 1 in the link). In a nutshell, one violates the prohibition of וּמִקְדָּשִׁי תִּירָאוּ - revere My sanctuaries (Vayikra 19:30). I just want to clarify, this ...



Top 50 recent answers are included